Official Direct Thread: The Hateful Eight (SPOILERS)

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  • ksa1001 said:

    @A_Ron_Hubbard  Yes the intermission is directly after the shooting of Bruce Dern's character. We're left w the awesome thoughts of fellatio and return from intermission w a voiceover from QT that we didn't have prior.



    Speaking of..the podcast does make me wonder....was that story accurate or not? Were we seeing it b/c it actually occurred(as I initially thought) or b/c that's what the father was picturing? 

    I"m going to re-watch tonight at home, wonder if there are any tells.
    I assumed that it was because that's what the father was picturing, and I also assumed that it didn't happen. One thing that makes me question my own theory is that I don't remember seeing the son's face much. If the father was the one imagining the scene, wouldn't he think of his son's face more? 
    ksa1001
  • Another mystery. I could see it going either way, but I'm going to choose to believe it didn't happen.
    Dummy
  • edited January 2016
    I also think SLJ was lying to provoke the Confederate. His character was a killer but most of the killings in his past were for war or self defense. He's much less likely than other people in that room to do what he described doing. The evil cackle during the violation made it seem most like an imagined tale. Also, the son had to know he was going to die once he was marched off naked, so I doubt he'd do that for a blanket. He knows he's dead anyway.
  • dan2988dan2988 manchester uk

    I saw it last night in what was admittedly one of the worst theater experiences of my life (movie aside, this fucking brew and view theater needs to get it's shit together, they're killing me), but I'm confident that I can be put in the "didn't like it" category.  I didn't hate it, and QT is still very good building tension, but I wish he'd come up with something new to defuse it. 


    The performance were great, but I thought the script was creaky even though the dialog was still mostly crackling.  Kind of wish QT would move on from the subject of race, it's pretty one note at this point. I didn't see it in 70mm, but my gut says it was "wasted" on the project. 
    The 70mm was definitely not wasted! Most directors would take the 70mm widescreen to show the details in beautiful landscapes (which he did) but qt uses it to show the details in each of his characters faces. No other would think of that and it worked perfectly. Who says widescreen has to just be for the outside? Worked perfectly in this setting

    NikkiP
  • DaveyMacDaveyMac Tokyo
    edited March 2016
    I am massively late to the party here, and I'm sure everyone else has long moved on, but we finally got it over here, though sadly no "Road Show" version. Only jarring part of the non-roadshow experience is the QT V.O. narration. Since there was no intermission, it felt jarring coming in immediately after Bruce Dern's death with the narration. 

    Anyway, I thought it was great, overall. I loved the opening shot with the frozen crucifix pulling back to reveal the stage coach. It is a slow burn of a movie, but I was sucked in immediately. The performances were all great. I was distracted by Tim Roth's channeling of Christoph Waltz in the beginning, but not for long. 

    I also loved all of the recurring devices used throughout (The Lincoln Letter, The door latch, the jelly bean on the floor, the coffee, etc.). I didn't feel the tension as much in this as a lot of his other films as it's a well he goes to quite often, but it also didn't take away from my enjoyment. 

    But I think the thing I appreciated most about it is just how much is left open and up to our interpretation in terms of lies, back stories, societal commentary, etc. 

    Every one talks about the Lincoln Letter and the story of the general's son when they talk about Sam Jackson's potential lies, but another small one that I find interesting is the way he talks about Minnie's sign saying no dogs or Mexicans in order to get Bob to confess that he's been lying. In the chapter 4, "The Four Passengers" we clearly see that she has no problem with Bob being in her Haberdashery. It just throws another example of a potential lie in the mix to make you question his reliability as a storyteller.

    Lastly, I feel like this film is in contrast to both Django and Inglourious Basterds in that those were very openly fantasies, whereas this one ends with the chapter, "Black Man, White Hell" and nobody gets out alive. The fantasy on display here is the Lincoln Letter. But there is no victory for anyone. 
    DummyWahl-e


  • I mentioned the Director's Cut podcast in our Moonrise Kingdom cast, but I wanted to highlight in particular this AMAZING podcast with QT and Nolan discussing The Hateful Eight. Makes me want to go watch 'The Thing' again.

    Also, spoiler, Nolan does not do much talking.
  • @levij I was just about to head over the Moonrise thread and say thanks for the DGA podcast recommendation. I downloaded several that I'm interested in. I love that they have another director besides the one who made it to discuss the films. 

    Also, side note following on from a comment in your Moonrise cast, I just wanted to say that "Story by" credit is actually more substantive than simply stating an idea. There has to be some writing involved for Story By. It's usually an outline or treatment or some other combination of written work that hasn't been published. It's just not the screenplay itself. 

    Anyway, thanks again for the great podcast recommendation! Now to just find time to squeeze it into the lineup. 
    levij
  • DaveyMac said:

    I am massively late to the party here, and I'm sure everyone else has long moved on, but we finally got it over here, though sadly no "Road Show" version. Only jarring part of the non-roadshow experience is the QT V.O. narration. Since there was no intermission, it felt jarring coming in immediately after Bruce Dern's death with the narration. 


    Anyway, I thought it was great, overall. I loved the opening shot with the frozen crucifix pulling back to reveal the stage coach. It is a slow burn of a movie, but I was sucked in immediately. The performances were all great. I was distracted by Tim Roth's channeling of Christoph Waltz in the beginning, but not for long. 

    I also loved all of the recurring devices used throughout (The Lincoln Letter, The door latch, the jelly bean on the floor, the coffee, etc.). I didn't feel the tension as much in this as a lot of his other films as it's a well he goes to quite often, but it also didn't take away from my enjoyment. 

    But I think the thing I appreciated most about it is just how much is left open and up to our interpretation in terms of lies, back stories, societal commentary, etc. 

    Every one talks about the Lincoln Letter and the story of the general's son when they talk about Sam Jackson's potential lies, but another small one that I find interesting is the way he talks about Minnie's sign saying no dogs or Mexicans in order to get Bob to confess that he's been lying. In the chapter 4, "The Four Passengers" we clearly see that she has no problem with Bob being in her Haberdashery. It just throws another example of a potential lie in the mix to make you question his reliability as a storyteller.
    I used the walton goggins character to know what was real or not. His character was proven right time and time agian. So I never believed the SLJ story. I thought the whole Mexican thing was a plot inconsistency, but now that you bring up that it could have been another SLJ lie I choose to believe that.

    But a plot hole that I can't explain and maybe someone here can is, Tim Roths character had the hangmans paperwork. How did he get it? They didn't kill a hangman, was it a deleted scene?


    DaveyMac
  • Yeah I wondered about how Tim Roth's character came by the Hangman papers, but I just assumed they tracked him down and killed him before coming up to the haberdashery as a way of solidifying their ruse. I've read the script, and I don't remember there being a scene that addresses it, so I don't think there was a deleted scene. I could be wrong about that though. 
  • @levij I just wanted to say thanks again for the DGA podcast recommendation. I listened to the Hateful Eight one today and it was great. Especially hearing about the writing process and also the conversation Tarantino had with Morricone in getting him write the score. 

    I just re-watched the film itself last night and enjoyed it even more a second time. I wanted to get it in while it's still winter.
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