Dropping The F Bomb On Cable

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2016/03/02/the_people_v_oj_simpson_is_the_rare_network_show_that_uses_the_f_word_why.html

Per the Slate article, cable shows can drop the F bomb and not worry about FCC issues. They just have to deal with potential issues with advertisers. The People vs OJ just did it.

So why the Fuck didn't TWD use it in the train car in the season 4 finale? Instead we got the reeeeemixed line "They're messing with the wrong people".

If FX can occasionally do it why not AMC?

Comments

  • Just comes down to corporate policy. FX has always been "edgier" than AMC. Plus FXs president seems pretty cool from some interviews I've seen, whereas AMC has been more of a pain over the years (splitting final seasons, allowing BB just one bleeped f-bomb per season, etc.)
    Travis
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    edited March 2016
    Money is the short answer.  Cable networks still have to answer to advertisers, and both networks and advertisers have to worry about watchdog groups who like to raise a fuss.  Networks have their own Standards & Practices departments who work with creators to enforce policy.   And as @MrX noted, corporate branding plays a large role also.

    As an aside, I must be inured to swearing because I did not even notice that particular F-bomb.  I was surprised to read about it afterwards and disappointed in myself that it did not even register as a thing that should be shocking to hear on television.
    TaraC73DaveyMacPhoebes89
  • It would be nice if somehow, the people that don't mind brutal violence/gore yet cannot abide certain spoken words, were literally forced to choose between somebody shouting f-bombs and that same somebody stabbing them. I cannot at all empathize with anyone that feels high strung about cable TV, let alone The Walking Dead...
  • AshleyAshley Atlanta, GA


    The FCC guidelines (for regular TV) allow obscene language after 10pm, so maybe FX figures they have enough leeway to do it without getting many complaints.

    AMC does seem to have their own rules about it, allowing the muted F-bombs (Mad Men got way more than one per season), but for TWD, and that particular episode, Scott Gimple decided that he didn't want the last sentence of the season to be partially muted. I'm sure there's been a lot of discussion about it this year, considering the character they're introducing. I'm interested to see how they handle this.

  • MichelleMichelle California
    Yeah, I was always sort of surprised that it wasn't blurted out on Mad Men, ever.  There were about a thousand instances when it well should or could have been, especially from Don & Peggy or any of the creatives, especially Stan.  :)
  • Mike SnowMike Snow Portland, ME
    I find it interesting that AMC limits shows to one f-bomb per season or half season, while Mr. Robot on USA has dozens of censored f-bombs in each episode.
  • WonderedObjectWonderedObject SAN Francisco, CA
    Melia004 said:

    It would be nice if somehow, the people that don't mind brutal violence/gore yet cannot abide certain spoken words, were literally forced to choose between somebody shouting f-bombs and that same somebody stabbing them. I cannot at all empathize with anyone that feels high strung about cable TV, let alone The Walking Dead...

    Lets not forget about sex. Apprently that's acceptable on FX as well. The stuff that American Horror Story got away with this past season as well as that final season of Sons Of Anarchy was some pretty intense HBOish television. 
    Go ahead, have graphic sex with that guy then slice his throat so that blood spurts out like its a volcano but don't you dare even think about dropping that F bomb. That's a line we could never cross. 
    MichelleTaraC73Phoebes89Mofojones333
  • The Magicians Season 3 that is currently airing on SyFy is dropping 1-2 F bombs every episode. It's remarkable. It was like that on Netflix when I caught up on the 1st 2 Seasons but I thought they just removed the dub over/blur once it went to a streaming service.
  • This puritanical streak is an American thing.  In Canada there's something called the "watershed hour" (which is 9pm) after which swearing and non-explicit nudity is permitted on regular network TV (ie our version NBC, ABC etc).  It's the same in the UK.  I think in Australia it's illegal to not swear (I kid Australia!).

    It can be pretty funny if you're watching a movie that begins airing at 8pm.  For the first hour there's lot of "aw, fudge!" and then 9pm rolls around and suddenly the 'fudges' are 'fucks'.  Even though its permissible, we don't see a lot of nudity...except in Quebec, French TV is pretty notorious for airing soft-core porn in prime time.
     
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    edited February 25
    This puritanical streak is an American thing.  In Canada there's something called the "watershed hour" (which is 9pm) after which swearing and non-explicit nudity is permitted on regular network TV (ie our version NBC, ABC etc).  It's the same in the UK.  I think in Australia it's illegal to not swear (I kid Australia!).

    It can be pretty funny if you're watching a movie that begins airing at 8pm.  For the first hour there's lot of "aw, fudge!" and then 9pm rolls around and suddenly the 'fudges' are 'fucks'.  Even though its permissible, we don't see a lot of nudity...except in Quebec, French TV is pretty notorious for airing soft-core porn in prime time.
     
    So if you're watching a TV rerun of Pulp Fiction that starts before nine does Samuel L Jackson switch from "say what again my friend" to... well we all know every line of that movie..... 

    You can air profanity on broadcast TV here, just after like 10 instead of 9, but same concept. 

    There does become a point where using profanity I think detracts from the Art. I loved Pulp Fiction but it would've been better with less language just as an example, it's like if your friend uses some bad words it's ok, but if they're inserted extreme profanity into every sentence it just doesn't seem right. I can see why networks want to limit that. 
    CretanBull
  • This puritanical streak is an American thing.  In Canada there's something called the "watershed hour" (which is 9pm) after which swearing and non-explicit nudity is permitted on regular network TV (ie our version NBC, ABC etc).  It's the same in the UK.  I think in Australia it's illegal to not swear (I kid Australia!).

    It can be pretty funny if you're watching a movie that begins airing at 8pm.  For the first hour there's lot of "aw, fudge!" and then 9pm rolls around and suddenly the 'fudges' are 'fucks'.  Even though its permissible, we don't see a lot of nudity...except in Quebec, French TV is pretty notorious for airing soft-core porn in prime time.
     
    So if you're watching a TV rerun of Pulp Fiction that starts before nine does Samuel L Jackson switch from "say what again my friend" to... well we all know every line of that movie..... 

    You can air profanity on broadcast TV here, just after like 10 instead of 9, but same concept. 

    There does become a point where using profanity I think detracts from the Art. I loved Pulp Fiction but it would've been better with less language just as an example, it's like if your friend uses some bad words it's ok, but if they're inserted extreme profanity into every sentence it just doesn't seem right. I can see why networks want to limit that. 
    I *think* in the US, it's the pressure from advertisers that ends up limited things.  The networks might be free to allow foul language, but major advertisers don't want their product to be associated with programming that offends (say middle America, for example) so they censor by choice to be able to charge the highest rates for advertising time.

    In Canada, when it comes to an over the top movie like Pulp Fiction they won't bother censoring it, they'll just air it at 9pm.  It would be too jarring if every second word for the first hour of the film was "fudge" and that suddenly turned into a deluge of "fucks" in the second half. 

    I agree with you about swearing in general.  I can't say that I don't swear at all, but it is pretty rare...I even avoid mundane-ish words like "shit"
  • MrXMrX CO
    edited February 25
    emnofseattle said:
    There does become a point where using profanity I think detracts from the Art. I loved Pulp Fiction but it would've been better with less language just as an example, it's like if your friend uses some bad words it's ok, but if they're inserted extreme profanity into every sentence it just doesn't seem right. I can see why networks want to limit that. 

    Sometimes extreme profanity elevates the art.

    Exhibit A:


    Exhibit B:

    darwinfeeshyJovial_FalconMofojones333
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