Last Movie You Saw & What Did you Think

15758596062

Comments

  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    The Killing of a Sacred Deer : This is on Netflix and I saw the director's previous movie, The Lobster, also starring Colin Farrell. I couldn't stand The Lobster, so I was hesitant about this. I liked it quite a bit more, but it also is one of those movies that is such a weird, niche movie, I am not sure I could recommend to anyone who doesn't like things outside of the norm. But if you are in an experimental mood, and want to see a horror movie where there is palpable dread and discomfort oozing in every scene...give it a whirl. 
  • The Killing of a Sacred Deer : This is on Netflix and I saw the director's previous movie, The Lobster, also starring Colin Farrell. I couldn't stand The Lobster, so I was hesitant about this. I liked it quite a bit more, but it also is one of those movies that is such a weird, niche movie, I am not sure I could recommend to anyone who doesn't like things outside of the norm. But if you are in an experimental mood, and want to see a horror movie where there is palpable dread and discomfort oozing in every scene...give it a whirl. 
    I watched his 2009 flick "Dogtooth."  Haven't seen anything else he's done.  Dogtooth was a hard watch.  It was a great movie, but man the content was rough.  If you haven't seen it, the top 6 IMDB tags are "overprotective father | sadism | misuse of language | child abuse | isolated house | sex education"
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    I like this guy so much I have his name memorized (looked up the spelling though): Yorgos Lanthimos. I've seen Dogtooth, Killing of a Sacred Deer, The Lobster, and The Favourite. I think his most accessible is The Lobster.
    CretanBullChinaski
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    JaimieT said:
    I like this guy so much I have his name memorized (looked up the spelling though): Yorgos Lanthimos. I've seen Dogtooth, Killing of a Sacred Deer, The Lobster, and The Favourite. I think his most accessible is The Lobster.
    Oh man, really? I thought The Lobster was pretty damn inaccessible. The last half of that movie is a complete blur to me. I would really like to rewatch Killing... and check out Dogtooth and The Favourite, though.
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    I'm Thinking of Ending Things -- The more I sit with this one, the more I like it. So much was being thrown on screen, it is hard to really know where to begin deciphering everything given. I have a good idea of what was going on. But I'd be curious to hear varying ideas. 
    CretanBull
  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    JaimieT said:
    I like this guy so much I have his name memorized (looked up the spelling though): Yorgos Lanthimos. I've seen Dogtooth, Killing of a Sacred Deer, The Lobster, and The Favourite. I think his most accessible is The Lobster.
    everything about this 100%.
    JaimieT
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited September 14
    JaimieT said:
    I like this guy so much I have his name memorized (looked up the spelling though): Yorgos Lanthimos. I've seen Dogtooth, Killing of a Sacred Deer, The Lobster, and The Favourite. I think his most accessible is The Lobster.
    Oh man, really? I thought The Lobster was pretty damn inaccessible. The last half of that movie is a complete blur to me. I would really like to rewatch Killing... and check out Dogtooth and The Favourite, though.

    Well, I picked The Lobster because it's high concept (you can summarize the plot in one sentence) and most movie lovers will understand the commentary of being sub-human if you aren't in a couple. 

    But your next best bet is The Favourite. For different reasons that movie could be called "the most accessible." The protagonist has a goal she's going for. Whereas in Dogtooth and Killing, they're mostly wrestling with an uncomfortable situation.

    Lanthimos isn't exactly accessible... but he's not awful.
    Chinaski
  • I'm Thinking of Ending Things -- The more I sit with this one, the more I like it. So much was being thrown on screen, it is hard to really know where to begin deciphering everything given. I have a good idea of what was going on. But I'd be curious to hear varying ideas. 
    I loved the movie.  I haven't read the book yet, but I picked it up the other day.  Here's my take (SPOILERS AHEAD!):

    The true 'beginning' of the movie is towards the end of the movie where Jake is in his car outside of the school.  Everything before then takes place in his mind.  I don't think that we're seeing memories, I think we're seeing a life that Jake laments not living.  He met/saw/had some interaction with "Lucy" playing trivia one night but lacked the courage to speak to her and has obsessed about what might have been ever since.  This is why her name changes (he never got the name of the women he saw at trivia), why her clothes change and why certain details of her life - is she a physicist? a poet? change - because all of these are details that he's had to imagine or speculate about over the years.  This is also why his parent's age changes - he's imagined this scenario over and over again over many years.

    Jake is basically an "incel" who has dreamt of something that most of us would find relatively mundane - bringing home a new girlfriend to meet our parents for the first time.

    The fact that he's thinking about this as he's sitting in his car and thinking of ending things tells us a lot about Jake and is very suggestive about the nature of the relationship he had with his parents.  It's pretty clear that Jake feels as if he's disappointed his parents and feels their judgment for not living up to expectations - we see that through various bits of the dinner conversations.  We also know that Jake feels like their judgment was unjustified.  In the scene where Jake is tending after his dementia-ridden mum, Lucy says something to the effect of what a good son he is and his reply (I forget his exact words) make it clear that he feels that he's gone unappreciated by his parents.

    I think this tells us why Jake is thinking of something relatively mundane as he's preparing to kill himself, it's because something as simple as bringing a girlfriend home to meet his parents would have changed their perception of him.

    As for the actual ending, I think it's an imagined idealized version of his life - the thoughts that are going through his head as he's dying.  We see things like a younger, better-looking version of himself dancing with a younger, better-looking version of his imaged girlfriend, we see them in love, getting married etc all of the 'normal' things that he missed out on in life and in culminates in him accepting a Nobel Prize - one of the ultimate symbols of achievement.
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    I like that a lot. Thanks for posting. It keeps stewing in my brain, in a similar way that Mulholland Drive did...so I am guessing I will give this another look eventually. I am going to give it some time to settle first, however. 
    CretanBull
  • I watched the Paris Hilton documentary last night.  I'm struggling to say what I think about it, but it's well worth watching.

    I was never interested in her, but wasn't a hater either - I just chalked her whole thing up as something that wasn't for me and didn't pay any attention to her at all.  The documentary is pretty good and honest-ish?  It's that question of honesty that I'm struggling with.  I think for someone who has projected a very manufactured image for most of her life some of the insights and revelations in the movie will seem like extreme vulnerability but at the same time, the whole thing comes across as very guarded and at a distance.  The movie doesn't really give you an opportunity to live with or feel any of the issues that she's had to deal with.

    I don't want to spoil anything, so I'll be as vague as possible...

    The movie opens with Paris (and others) participating in some kind of campaign to raise awareness for people who suffered through an unnamed traumatic event in their collective past.  The movie then rewinds and gives you access to her life and lifestyle, how she grew up, what she was like as a kid, goes into family history, what it was like to be a huge sensation etc and you're told and shown how all of her 'bad' behaviour can be attributed to the past traumatic event (which at this point you still don't know what it was) then at the end the nature of the traumatic event is revealed when she's reunited with other survivors and together they participate in an awareness campaign.  Paris' reunion with these old friends was the best and most insightful part of the movie. These people knew her when she was a kid and were bonded by their common trauma...they knew her and she couldn't be fake or guarded around them. 

    That last point is important because the whole movie is (unintentionally) about Paris's yearning for something real.  She's aware that in public she plays a character that is fake, is surrounded by the trappings of wealth that have lost their value (ie she has piles of jewelry that she couldn't wear in a lifetime, it just sits forgotten about in room in her mansion), knows that she's surrounded by people who want something from her etc.  She realizes that she's given up her life and humanity and become a product, not a person.  She also knows she did it to herself, but despite all of her awareness she still feels compelled to keep doing more of the same.

    It's hard to make a beautiful, ultra-rich person sympathetic but at times I genuinely felt sorry for her and didn't envy her life at all. 

    Having said all of that, there was something missing in this movie.  It left me with a niggling feeling that this 'honest-ish' movie was a manufactured PR move aimed at re-branding Paris.  There's some meta-level irony to that.  Parri's efforts to do something 'real' get overtaken by her compulsion to constantly be promoting, fronting, marketing, image shaping etc.

    What could have and should have been (and sometimes was!) an honest movie that lets us into her life and shows us who she really is and what she's gone through, ended up feeling like a promo launch for the new and improved Paris Hilton 2.0 ®
  • CretanBullCretanBull Toronto
    edited September 17
    ^ PS - Never in my life would I imagine that I'd put so much thought into Paris Hilton  :D
    ChinaskiHatorianNoel
  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    i recently read an article that described the boarding school she went to (which i'm assuming is an important part of the doc). it was some pretty messed up shit man.
    CretanBull
  • I just watched "Time Trap" on Netflix. The reviews are horrible, but I absolutely loved it. I'm seriously wondering if the other reviewers watched the same movie. It's sci-fi, as the name implies. Character motivation is pretty iffy throughout, but the premise is solid and the delivery of it was great!  It's not afraid to keep getting weirder and really lays on the gas. If you're willing to overlook the flaws, it's a real gem. I think it would make a great discussion on OTC!  Seems like it would be right up @Jim 's alley. 
    Cool My cousin worked on this film.
    JoshTheBlack
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    edited September 20
    Blackbird.

    This movie should have been titled “Airbnb” subtitled “Chunky knit cardigans and Barn Jackets” 

    But you know this was a movie you can poke fun at when you want to, get misty eyed when you want to, and enjoy the set. 
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    edited September 20
    Goodfellas. 1st time. Many many years ago my wife and I made an excel spreadsheet of “Movies people should slap us if we admitted we haven’t watched.” Wish I could find that list. Think it got bricked on an old hard drive. The Godfather Trilogy was on there, but this one wasn’t. But it should’ve and that box is now checked. Crazy to see Sopranos cast! Now I can dig into the podcast! 
    CretanBullDeeNoel
  • cdrive said:
    Goodfellas. 1st time. Many many years ago my wife and I made excel spreadsheet of “Movies people should slap us if we admitted we haven’t watched.” Wish I could find that list. Think it got bricked on an old hard drive. The Godfather Trilogy was on there, but this one wasn’t. But it should’ve and that box is now checked. Crazy to see Sopranos cast! Now I can dig into the podcast! 
    One of my favourite movies ever!
    cdrive
  • I've been watching a lot of Australian movies of late and I have a question for @Dee Is Australia just a giant white trash refuge?
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    @fidoz Pretty much, yep. 
    fidoz
  • fidoz said:
    I've been watching a lot of Australian movies of late and I have a question for @Dee Is Australia just a giant white trash refuge?
    No.  It's a giant white trash refuge where anything can kill you at any time.  I don't know how Aussie's make it past 20 years old, but I'm certain that an 80 year old Aussie is the toughest MF'er in the world.

    fidozDee
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    What Oz films have you been watching, @fidoz?
  • @Dee I saw The Nightingale a while back, have you seen it?

  • DeeDee Adelaide
    @CretanBull I have not, I didn’t even know that one was Australian. 
  • Dee said:
    @CretanBull I have not, I didn’t even know that one was Australian. 
    It was written and directed by Jennifer Kent (who also did The Babadook).  It takes place in the 19th C in Tasmania. 

    Dee
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    I know there might be some John Dwyer / Ohsees fans here like I think @Chinaski and I know @fidoz is big into noir, but this short little criterion collection piece is pretty cool: https://youtu.be/g_sFEPf61_g

    After watching that I now have both Odd Man Out and Repo Man on deck. I love it when you get inspired by a good recommendation to watch something.  
    Chinaski
  • Enola Holmes, new movie on Netflix about Sherlock's sister. Nothing groundbreaking, but a fun watch, with a solid cast; Millie Bobbie Brown as the lead, Henry Cavill as Sherlock, and Helena Bonham Carter as their mother, plus some other good supporting actors.
    bizmarkiefaderCretanBull
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    @Dee I saw The Nightingale a while back, have you seen it?

    I checked that out a few months back as well...holy cow. That whole moCretanBull said:
    @Dee I saw The Nightingale a while back, have you seen it?


    I caught this movie a few months ago. It is insanely upsetting. But the first 30 minutes are among the most harrowing I have seen. 
    CretanBull
  • MrX said:
    Enola Holmes, new movie on Netflix about Sherlock's sister. Nothing groundbreaking, but a fun watch, with a solid cast; Millie Bobbie Brown as the lead, Henry Cavill as Sherlock, and Helena Bonham Carter as their mother, plus some other good supporting actors.
    I liked it, It felt like one of those 90s Nickelodeon kid detective shows. The fourth wall breaking was a little much for me but it's geared towards a younger audience so it works for what it is
    MrX
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    Jurassic Park. I'm pretty sure it is the best movie ever made. 1993. 
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Freddy said:
    Jurassic Park. I'm pretty sure it is the best movie ever made. 1993. 
    Tremors would like a word. 
    Freddy
  • I watched The Devil All the Time which has an absolutely loaded cast with Tom Holland, Bill Skarsgard, Sebastian Stan, Robert Pattinson, and Eliza Scanlen (Amma from Sharp Objects). This is about as opposite as possible to being a light hearted movie. It's very dark, very slow and honestly not very compelling. The acting was outstanding but I found with how slow it was to just not care very much about what was happening. 
Sign In or Register to comment.