Dunkirk is World War 2

HatorianHatorian Dagobah
edited August 2016 in Movies
Man. I hate to be that guy who corrects you guys. I dont want to do this. But after listening to the Suicide Squad cast and hearing World War 1 like three times I just couldn't handle it anymore being a history buff. 

Dunkirk is set in 1940 World War 2. The BEF (British Expeditionary Force) is reeling after Germany swept into Northern France and routed the French and British forces. (spoilers i guess) The "Miracle of Dunkirk" is how the BEF was saved from capture/destruction. 
FlashGordonTaraC73TheEconomistfidoz

Comments

  • Yeh i thought about mentioning it, but I figured Aron would get plenty of e-mails, it's still a thing in popular British culture, it kind of is to the UK what Pearl Harbor is to the US in terms of the flag pole events at the beginning of the war and most Brits would know what you mean if your refer to "the Dunkirk spirit". There's a great scene in the long good Friday that references it

    Strong history knowledge though @Hatorian ;
    HatorianTheEconomist
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    edited August 2016
    World war 2 is what I do. One of my Masters degree is in Military History so I am a bit of stickler. I also let doughboy slide. But in reality that is both also a World War 1 term and is mostly used for US soldiers from the American Expeditionary Force. :) the guys definitely deserve a pass though. They are most likely smarter than me. maybe just not in military history...:)
    Freddy
  • I could see maybe the helmets throwing the guys off. The helmets are very World War 1ish. To someone who doesn't follow World Wars closely and never heard of Dunkirk I could see them thinking World War 1 just based on those helmets. 
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    Yeah, it was totally the helmets, plus I couldn't figure out if the guys were on a bridge, boat or in a trench. The latter of which is a dead WWI giveaway.

    Sorry I got it wrong!
    Hatorian
  • No need to apologise dude. Everyone makes mistakes. And the helmets were definitely WW1 looking
  • History undergrad / WWII nerd here.  Can't wait for the movie.  Listening to the 'Suicide Squad' cast now.  Jim and A_Ron are forgiven.  They are still my favorite internet disembodied voice personalities.

    Stuka attacks must have been TERRIFYING!!
    Hatorian
  • HedgeKnight84xHedgeKnight84x East Central Indiana
    edited August 2016
    I'm glad that's cleared up because originally I thought I'd read it was a WW2 film, but then the trailer had those helmets that reminded me of WW1 and then I heard the Suicie Squad podcast and thought I must have been wrong.  Go figure.

    Also, speaking of that trailer, reddit noticed one weird reaction from one of the extras in that final shot that can't be unseen once you notice it:

    It's the second guy to turn around, over toward the right: (I tried to link directly to 35 seconds in, but it got formatted or whatnot by the forum software to start from the beginning).



    Here's a gif:

    HatorianGredalBeeUnderwood
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Is this a remake of the original Dunkirk movie with all those "What ho, jolly good, pip pip" actors in it, or something completely different? (I used to love old school 40s/50s war movies - went through a phase of watching a ton of them when I was a teen)
    Hatorian
  • Haven't heard anything about a remake. Seems to be a Nolan original. Could be wrong though.

    I was a big fan of Midway, Longest Day, Bridge too Far. All excellent movies. Might have been later than the 50s though.
    TheEconomist
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    I love The Great Escape, Bridge On The River Kwai, The Best Years Of Our Lives, that one about Douglas Bader, etc. I haven't seen any of them for years but I watched them a ton 20+ years ago.

    What's the one with the bombs skipping over the water? That was a good one, too.
    Hatorian
  • All of those were good as well. Dam Busters is probably what you're thinking of. Dirty Dozen is obviously a classic as well.
    Dee
  • TheEconomistTheEconomist Chattanooga, TN

    Yeah, it was totally the helmets, plus I couldn't figure out if the guys were on a bridge, boat or in a trench. The latter of which is a dead WWI giveaway.

    Sorry I got it wrong!


    I think this confusion illustrates just how unprepared the British were for war that lead to the events of Dunkirk. They're equipped with much of the same type of kit from a war era that's over twenty years old.

    I was going to bag on still carrying bolt action rifles but most armies then still did. Also US has stuck the same main battle rifle since Vietnam so it's not unusual in military history.
  • At least they were doing better than the French at the beginning of World War I with their bright red pants, no helmets, marching in formation towards machine guns and trying to use horse cavalry against those same machine guns.   
  • TheEconomistTheEconomist Chattanooga, TN

    At least they were doing better than the French at the beginning of World War I with their bright red pants, no helmets, marching in formation towards machine guns and trying to use horse cavalry against those same machine guns.   


    To be fair conscripting and equipping millions of men to fight off a millions strong German army invading would be challenging especially if they're total civilians with no experience in modern warfare. I mean if that same German army invaded US in 1914 would the govt even have enough rifles in inventory to defend itself? Would an Iowa farm boy even know what a machine gun looked like let alone what it could do?
    Hatorian
  • The point was more that the French (and a lot of others) had no idea how the technology had changed the way engagements should happen. The French lost thousands of people immediately because of that.
    Hatorian
  • TheEconomistTheEconomist Chattanooga, TN
    What's perverse about WW1 is just how brutal the technology was compared with its countermeasures. Even two years in we are still seeing mass infantry attacks at against entreched positions like the Battle of the Somme where the British lose 20k men in a day.
    GredalBeeHatorian
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    edited August 2016
    The route was a mix of everything.

    1. German mechanized and Motorized divisions were revolutionary. It was a perfect union of infantry, armor, support, speed, power, etc.

    2. The Strategy to Attack France north of the Maginot line through The Low Countries allowed the Germans to speed through France with little resistance.

    3. The British and French armies were not equipped with the proper weaponry to deal with German's mechanized units Nor did they really want to fight a war anyways.

    4. British and French leadership were already beat before they knew what to do. Retreat or surrender was the only answer.
    TheEconomist
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    edited August 2016
    Germany also properly executed the use of air superiority and ground support. which was still very much in its infancy. 
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    @Hatorian I'm not reading anymore of this thread because I hate history more than I hate Christopher Nolan, but I still have to put my two cents in: you should totally change your signature from "No Half Measures...." to "World War 2 is what I do"
    Hatorian
  • Hatorian said:

    Germany also properly executed the use of air superiority and ground support. which was still very much in its infancy. 

    ...but, attempted to complete the victory primarily through air power, thus, allowing the BEF to escape.
    TheEconomist
  • @tom_g

    Actually the Germans had the ground forces to destroy the British army. its still an argument among historians today why they did not follow up their success and let the army escape.
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