Spoiler Alert

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  • MichelleMichelle California
    Seriously.   There was a woman from the UK, posting a comment on one of The Walking Dead's Facebook posts, straight up telling people to NOT post any spoilers as she will not be able to see the episode until the next day or so.  Uhmmm, 1) you're on social media, what do you expect?  2)  seriously, telling people NOT to do something is the fastest way to get them to do it, and 3) you're on The Walking Dead's own page!  

    Some people.  *smdh*
    Frakkin T
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    Hear hear!

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    hisdudeness915TaraC7327timechampsPLUSarodsuckshypergenesb
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  • Speaking as someone who has stupidly clicked into social media and forgotten I'm trying to avoid something (what? I have a long commute) you really only have yourself to blame.
    voodooratMichellehisdudeness915Melonusk
  • TaraC73TaraC73 Manchester NH
    Preaching to the choir
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Settle down, Americans - we are not all in the same time zone. I agree it's stupid to go to the actual page of the show, but social media is so prevalent that it's a pain in the arse to have to actively avoid it for hours (or sometimes days) just because we don't live in the US.
    DaveyMacmichielterlouwBlazino
  • I'm not the type of person to got a shows page and tell people not to post spoilers as that's just ridiculous. And I don't actively request people to avoid spoilers even on my page.

    However, I do get annoyed when people post major spoilers for shows that they know people don't want spoiled on their regular old facebook feed. That's just not cool. Especially with so many different time zones and airing times. 
    DeemichielterlouwBlazino
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  • WonderedObjectWonderedObject SAN Francisco, CA
    edited October 2016

    I will concede a tiny bit for the time zone thing. I live in the Pacific time zone and you frequently see a lot of Facebook posts before the shows have even aired here. And they'll say stuff like YOU WON'T BELIEVE WHO DIED OMG SPOILER ALERT. haha


    We just don't do Facebook after a certain time on Sunday any more (all the shows seem to be on Sunday). We tried watching a couple episodes of GoT in the app last season because they put them in there on East Coast time but it wasn't as fun not to watch it later at night for some reason.
    That's funny. I'm the complete opposite. The only reason I'm with direct TV is So I can watch everything with the east coast or 3 hours ahead in my case. Always interesting to hear other views.
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  • Undeniably, you are risking spoilers by getting online at all, but no one learns that lesson the easy way, so I don't think it unreasonable to err on the side of not blatantly spoiling specific plot points right on a Facebook wall or in a tweet. Not everyone has cable/satellite anymore, having to view the next day whether they want to or not, but social media is for communication, so people should be able to talk about whatever they want... Just find a medium. Don't be a dick about it!
    Blazino
  • AshleyAshley Atlanta, GA

    I totally agree. I can't watch most things live because I need to get to bed by 9:00, so it's usually a few days before I catch up on shows. And there's no way I'm gonna go on the internet thinking I won't be spoiled. But the onus is not on social media to cater to me. If spoilers matter that much to me, I'll find a way to either watch it live or stay off the internet until I can.

    TaraC73hisdudeness915Travisphoenyx1023
  • People aren't very willing to sacrifice their social media dopamine fix for a few hours or days to avoid spoilers, I guess.
  • voodooratvoodoorat Atlanta
    edited October 2016
    it really depends on the "event".  if it's big enough (say, who just won the superbowl), i expect to be spoiled immediately regardless of what i do, varying down to where i would be annoyed if a movie came out and someone posted a spoiler on a site not devoted to the movie.  the walking dead season premier after the bullshit of last season's finale is i think closer to the former than the latter, when we were unable to watch it due to at&t sucking nuts i fully expected to be spoiled immediately even if i'd tried fairly hard to avoid it so i didn't even bother--no point setting myself up to get mad.  i deliberately tried to watch it "live" to avoid it being spoiled.
    TravisDummy
  • I partly agree, and partly disagree. If the show is as big as TWD or GoT then you should expect to be spoiled. But I wish there was an informal internet rule where you have to wait till the next day. I remember going to a midnight premier of the Hunger Games and seeing people post spoilers about it that nigh on Facebook. That seems a little outrageous to me, but on the other hand I do avoid social media if I really care about not being spoiled. 
    Travis
  • I want to disagree because I am sympathetic to people who stumble onto something big without realizing the risk (say people who aren't terribly internet savvy and just pop into facebook and right there, in your face is some huge spoiler), but ultimately those sorts of conversations are a big part of the whole "taking the water cooler to the internet" thing that I really enjoy about social media. So, I definitely come down on the side of people not having their conversations restricted for the benefit of people who either weren't invested enough to watch as it was happening, or people who don't know that they need to run away from the internet until they catch up. I've been burned before too and had to learn that lesson, but it's your responsibility to avoid the information. Would people be expected to not talk about the Super Bowl on Monday morning? Would people be expected to not talk about Presidential debates? It's the same thing. I am sympathetic, but if you're getting mad about it you're sadly wrong. Once it has aired it's fair game, and as much as I'm extra sympathetic to people on the west coast (like myself), unfortunately it's kind of the same thing. Those sites are platforms for conversation and that's what is relevant to people. 

    @tpelzy Movies are trickier, I totally get that, but you're right. That's kind of just what you have to do. I will say that I was really pleased that people (at least in my sphere) were super considerate with the new Star Wars. Nothing popped up at all (at least without a big, bold, all-capped "SPOILERS TO FOLLOW" banner) on any of my feeds for at least a few days, a couple of weeks even. I thought that was really cool.
    Ashleytpelzy
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  • DeeDee Adelaide
    MichaelG said:

    People aren't very willing to sacrifice their social media dopamine fix for a few hours or days to avoid spoilers, I guess.

    That's judgy - a lot of people use social media for work, and for many others it's their only social interaction.

    I could say people aren't willing to sacrifice their need to be the first to blab something about a TV show.

  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    Melia004 said:

    Undeniably, you are risking spoilers by getting online at all, but no one learns that lesson the easy way, so I don't think it unreasonable to err on the side of not blatantly spoiling specific plot points right on a Facebook wall or in a tweet. Not everyone has cable/satellite anymore, having to view the next day whether they want to or not, but social media is for communication, so people should be able to talk about whatever they want... Just find a medium. Don't be a dick about it!

    I try to live by the DBAA rule (Don't Be An Asshole), hopefully succeeding most of the time at least. If everyone followed DBAA, the world would be a nicer place, but the internet is dark and full of spoilers (and assholes).
    hisdudeness915DeeTravisDaveyMacMichelle
  • TravisTravis CA
    edited October 2016
    Yeah, because I am really neurotic I do feel like I should clarify since my stance may have seemed harsh. For my personal sort of rules I don't post spoilers either. I think that it is the responsibility of the person avoiding them to know the risks, but I've never been one to run to the internet the moment that something crazy happens in a show to tell the world about it. I'll discuss things on other people's existing posts, or maybe I'll say something very non-specific, but I think that the friendly thing to do is wait a while (or try to mark the risks of reading and avoid posting some picture that will grab people's eyes before they realize what they're seeing) and I try to observe it.
    DeeMichelle
  • Yeah I get that people want to talk about stuff, but I also think doing a big facebook blast to any and all friends who might have you in their feed is a bit thoughtless. Like for those kinds of forums, I think things like "Game of Thrones...WOW" or vague comments like that are totally cool. 

    But then if you want to go more detailed with actual content you come to the forums here or you go to the facebook page of the show and post there, and whatnot. 

    I'm not trying to restrict anyone. Just asking for more thoughtfulness on the part of the posters. 

    But, as has already been pointed out, this is the internet...
  • Dee said:

    Settle down, Americans - we are not all in the same time zone. I agree it's stupid to go to the actual page of the show, but social media is so prevalent that it's a pain in the arse to have to actively avoid it for hours (or sometimes days) just because we don't live in the US.

    Don't you know Americans own social media and the internet, you're lucky they even allow foreigners like yourself online. So quit your complaining and be grateful.
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  • AshleyAshley Atlanta, GA

    I definitely subscribe to the DBAA code. I do think there's a certain space, during the show's airing, where all bets should be off. Half the fun of a lot of these shows is watching with everyone else on social media. (I don't know if any of you guys are familiar with "Black Twitter," but it makes literally every show better, lol.) So if you're online at 9pm ET, trying to avoid spoilers for any popular show, I really don't know what to tell you. But outside of that window, I do try not to talk about spoilers until it's been at least a few days. And even when I do live-tweet, I always use the show's hashtag so it can be muted if necessary.

  • Even though people should be watching their step, it's not exactly cool to leave items that may cause a trip laying around, right? The problems really arise when you get someone that is too polar one way or the other.
  • Yeah I basically stay off Twitter when a show I watch is airing. I find that Twitter is much more of a free-for-all than Facebook when it comes to people live-watching.
    Jovial_Falcon
  • Same with Wrestling. Someone sees Hulk Hogan at an airport near the event site and they immediately post to twitter spoiling a big return or something. It's a shame people can't keep things to themselves
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