Huma Abedin and Data Security

I don't deal with or pass on sensitive data on a daily basis.  Why then do I appear to have more care about my personal data security than a 40 year old political operator with a compromised husband?  How on earth was Huma Abedin using a computer that Anthony Weiner had access to for work business; given that she did, how did she not sterilize it at some point over the last several years?

Comments

  • edited October 2016
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  • kingbee67kingbee67 Los Angeles Ca.
    What the hell is wrong with that guy? How many times is this guy gonna fuck up? The ball game hangs on this guys dick. God help us, please!
    Dummy
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  • Because they're super entitled powermongers that live in an environment where they don't have consequences for their actions, so why bother? 
  • edited October 2016
    Again, we have no real clue what is on those emails.
    Not even the FBI director. They can range from "hey, can you pick up starbucks on the way in" to highly classified stuff. The FBI just saw that there were emails there, but has no idea of their content.
    tom_g
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    As a former IT administrator, you'd be horrified if you knew how casually people take data security.  Even people that really, really should, like executives dealing with sensitive customer and credit card data.  You hire a person for a specialized skillset, and then expect them to be data security experts on top of it, and you're going to have a bad time.

    Personally, I hope all this attention makes government types take the issues more seriously.  The real answer is to properly enforce data security, you have to build a system where users can't really fuck up things, and that's incredibly hard to do.  Because if a user can, a user somewhere, somehow, will.  The early 21st century is going to be pretty exciting times for this reason.  
    KingKobraOldGriswold
  • kingbee67kingbee67 Los Angeles Ca.
    One thing is the only info on this computer that can be used is from 2009 to 2013. That is when Clinton was Secretary Of State. That is three years out.

    How long has this computer been in service?
    How many e mail items have been sent during the years of her term as secretary?
    How many have been seen by the FBI already?
    How many are just normal conversations?

    I sucked the life out my last PC I had that for like 3 years. Most people I know go thru computers like 2 years or so. If your a guy who has a real job where you need a computer, don't think you would swap them frequently? Just sayin.
  • @A_Ron_Hubbard as a current "system admin" I would agree. While it does come to the forefront, the bigger the company the more likely you'll be more reactive than proactive. Of course that's only with internal/customer side issues. When dealing with laptops/PCs they are a haven of bad news.

    @kingbee67 corporate desktops/laptops are only replaced as needed. It isn't irregular to have devices that are 5+ years old. If it's not broken, then why replace/fix it. The company I work for now it's a minimum of 3 years before a replacement can be received.
  • Doctor_NickDoctor_Nick Terminus
    edited October 2016
    @kingbee67

    My personal laptop is from 2011.  I just replaced my 2010 desktop this year with my first home built computer.  When I swapped in an SSD to the laptop, I erased and destroyed the old hard drive.  It would seem to be pretty obvious that when you stop using a computer, you should get your information off of it, even if that's just formatting and reinstalling or restoring.  
  • @kingbee67


    My personal laptop is from 2011.  I just replaced my 2010 desktop this year with my first home built computer.  When I swapped in an SSD to the laptop, I erased and destroyed the old hard drive.  It would seem to be pretty obvious that when you stop using a computer, you should get your information off of it, even if that's just formatting and reinstalling or restoring.  
    It sounds obvious for those in the "know". There are millions upon millions who don't however. Even if they do, they don't "wipe" the drives or destroy them. This is why public auctions of former corporate devices were so popular. The lack luster security protocols made it easy to extract the data. I used to know someone that worked in EDiscovery (I still know a number of people). The stories you'd hear are keep me of crazy. In most cases their job isn't that hard unless someone willfully destroys the data and knows what they are doing. With the tools available to the populace now, the only sure way is to destroy the drive completely (open up destroy platters). Formatting and rewriting unless done numerous (and I mean numerous) data can still be extracted ;)

  • The good ol' Boot and Nuke.
    KingKobra
  • As a former IT administrator, you'd be horrified if you knew how casually people take data security.  Even people that really, really should, like executives dealing with sensitive customer and credit card data.  You hire a person for a specialized skillset, and then expect them to be data security experts on top of it, and you're going to have a bad time.


    Personally, I hope all this attention makes government types take the issues more seriously.  The real answer is to properly enforce data security, you have to build a system where users can't really fuck up things, and that's incredibly hard to do.  Because if a user can, a user somewhere, somehow, will.  The early 21st century is going to be pretty exciting times for this reason.  
    This, basically.  People are dumbasses.  Oh, and also vastly underestimate how much stuff is 1. tracked, 2. reportable and 3. visible even to the most numbskull administrator.

    Mostly its not a problem because IT Admins have better things to occupy their time.  Like cat videos on youtube.
    KingKobra
  • kingbee67 said:

    One thing is the only info on this computer that can be used is from 2009 to 2013. That is when Clinton was Secretary Of State. That is three years out.

    How long has this computer been in service?
    How many e mail items have been sent during the years of her term as secretary?
    How many have been seen by the FBI already?
    How many are just normal conversations?

    I sucked the life out my last PC I had that for like 3 years. Most people I know go thru computers like 2 years or so. If your a guy who has a real job where you need a computer, don't think you would swap them frequently? Just sayin.

    Maybe its a mac, they last for decades apparently
  • Heard a little bit more on the keeping it 1600 podcast.

    Essentially what has happened so far is that they had a warrant for Wiener's communications. When they got the laptop, they saw that there was also some Huma emails in there, since she also used it, but those emails were not covered by the original warrant. So they decided to get a warrant for her emails, and Comey decided to notify congress so they didn't think he was misleading them. But at this point, it may just be emails from last year with cat pictures or whatever. The FBI up until obtaining the warrant yesterday only knew that there were Huma emails on the laptop, and nothing else.
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  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    I saw a tweet that said what was discovered was a hidden folder labeled "Life Insurance," just like in the movies. It's crazy wild conjecture and I don't believe it but could you imagine if Weiner had a blackmail file that was found by the FBI?
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