Official Direct Thread: Rushmore

Consider this your official thread for Wes Anderson's Rushmore. What are your favorite moments, themes, and compositions? How do you think this film relates to the rest of Anderson's filmography? Discuss! 
voodoorat

Comments

  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    Just happened to watch this one a few days before you guys announced W.A. as the directors. I remember liking it when I first saw it (sometime back in high school), but it was a big bag of meh this time. Jason Schwartzman is in a lot of decent stuff, but after watching Rushmore again I've come to realize that it's in spite of him.

    That being said, Bill Murray is solid as always, and if it wasn't for Rushmore being so well received we probably wouldn't have The Life Aquatic (easily W.A.'s best movie).

    On a Direct related note: Rushmore is the film that introduces the "ambiguously rich" trope. A character or characters who's wealth and status or how they obtained it isn't ever made clear, but the fact that they have it is front and center. He started making the upper class into somewhat of a caricature of itself in Bottle Rocket, but really dug into it here. Plenty of movies have this trope to one extent or the other, but Anderson is one of the few directors who makes it a focus.
    TravisDaveyMac
  • Freddy said:

    On a Direct related note: Rushmore is the film that introduces the "ambiguously rich" trope. A character or characters who's wealth and status or how they obtained it isn't ever made clear, but the fact that they have it is front and center. He started making the upper class into somewhat of a caricature of itself in Bottle Rocket, but really dug into it here. Plenty of movies have this trope to one extent or the other, but Anderson is one of the few directors who makes it a focus.

    This is a fascinating observation. In fact, we did not really get much backstory for any character or where there quirks come from. There are little snippets hidden around the film, but largely you have to construct an caricature purely on their words and actions within the confines of the film. There's little to no exposition.
    TravisFreddy
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited November 2016
    @levij Exactly. It's an awful movie. Freddy C doesn't truck with no exposition having hipster bullshit. :)
  • Hey boys , I previously posted as tebster but I’m back fresh with a new screenname.

    Rushmore, a film that could be easily mistaken for just a fun toned coming of age film, But I believe it’s also an argumentive commentary on the idea of coming of age.yes like most coming of age films , our main character wants nothing more than to skip forward in life and grow up, without putting the work in. his attitude and swagger boasts constantly of being a mature adult despite his actual age, but the he constantly lies about his action and history to try and achieve the benefits of that maturity. This Shows he isn’t actually confident in any of his boasts,But we also have “hemin” (bill Murry) who is an adult. He has all the things that max says he wants, but suffers from severe disappointment.disappointment of how things turned out in his lifewhich intern led to disappointment in his wifeAnd his kidsThis disappointment caused him to cheat on his wife and eventually have a feuding rivalry with a child “max” for a chunk  of the film. Showing his immaturity,in contrast of the 2 ,Rushmore examines a character that wants to be grow up but isnt and his grown up friend/mentor that never grew up, but mealy pretended too.oliva Williams character rosemary summed it up well, when she said to max “you two deserve each other, you are both children”anyways those are my quick surface level thoughts.keep up the great work and God bless
    DaveyMac
  • DaveyMacDaveyMac Tokyo
    edited November 2016
    This was maybe my third of fourth time watching Rushmore, and I enjoyed it more this time then I ever have in the past. I'm one of the few that has never rated Rushmore as highly as some of his other films. Mostly because I have a strong aversion to Jason Swartzman. I just have never enjoyed watching him on screen and that's the major reason why I haven't really enjoyed the movie much in the past. Even though he is perfect for the character. But this time, was different. For whatever reason I was able to look past him and appreciate the film on it's own terms. There's a ton of stuff going on here thematically. And it's expertly crafted. 

    There's a bunch of stuff that I never really picked up on in the past and this short essay included with the Criterion edition of the movie helped bring some of it out for me. It's super short and well worth a read. It basically talks about Max as a character and his flaws. It also compares the film to Mark Twain and Huckleberry Finn and talks a bit about how the movie deals with divisions in class, race, and age. The essay also touches on some autobiographical elements of the film that relate to Owen Wilson and Wes Anderson's backgrounds.

    I can't wait to hear you guys discuss this one. 
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    When does it say Blume is a steel tycoon? I thought he was just shown to be a generic industrialist.
  • Freddy said:

    When does it say Blume is a steel tycoon? I thought he was just shown to be a generic industrialist.

    I got the sense that he was manufacturing steel products, probably from when he was on the phone saying, "I don't want alloys, I want steel." For some reason that stuck in my noggin. I have also been in a steel mill a time or two and it looked like his factory. But it's likely not canon that he's specifically a steel tycoon.
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    @levij What the hell were you doing in a steel mill? Looking for donations to build an exotic fish tank?
  • @Freddy It was donations for an alpacca farm - my inappropriately older crush was in to alpaccas.

    But really it was a field trip in architecture school.
    FreddyDaveyMac
  • I really enjoyed the Rushmore cast, guys. I totally hadn't considered the idea that Rushmore could be Max's way of holding onto his mother. Really interesting stuff. 

    And I was so happy to hear Eric mention Noah Baumbach. I was gonna mention him when we got to Life Aquatic. I'm actually not that big of a fan of some of his work, but I absolutely love The Squid and the Whale. It's a great example of a film where all of the characters are massively flawed and unlikeable and yet the movie is so damn compelling because the performances are so good and the character dynamics are so interesting to me. I haven't seen his two most recent films yet, but I am looking forward to checking them out.

    Speaking of Life Aquatic, this film gives kind of a tease for that one with the aquarium stuff and Jacques Cousteau book.
    FreddyWahl-eTravis
  • I haven't seen his two most recent films yet, but I am looking forward to checking them out.

    Mistress America and While Were Young are both pretty great. I really appreciate his voice and perspective. 
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