[OFFICIAL] Episode 603 - "Noblesse Oblige"

Director: Peter Weller
Writer: Taylor Elmore & Benjamin Cavell

Comments

  • ajknickajknick Madison WI
    hmm Ty IS Sam Elliot's land buying Herald. if he gets up to murdering whores I think they owe David Milch some money. Rachel ep much less compelling than the Tim ep which I was almost giddy about. this one much less fun.
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited February 2015
    Great episode. One of the most Elmore Leonardy in terms of dialogue (and that's saying alot), and I'm always a fan of anything Peter Weller does. Liked that Boyd's bar serves Buffalo Trace; that's a damn good whiskey. Gotta say though, their draft beer selection was a damn sight better than I expected for a dive bar in rural Kentucky.

    My vote for line of the week:
    "You understand me, Earl? I'm going to shoot your dick off."
  • ksa1001ksa1001 Plano, TX
    edited February 2015
    Really loved the episode and how this season is going thus far. My only slight concern. If we're to really fear Avery Markham, is it far-fetched at all that he and his guys would go through the whole kidnapping and threatening and NOT hurt either party? Wouldn't that universally be viewed as a show/sign of weakness? (It's entirely possible that I've been watching too much of The Wire too, I just know there would be no warning from a Marlo Stanfield type)
  • I took Avery's threats on Boyd and Ava (and not taking to violence straight out) as an attempt to flush out who was behind them. Boyd knew Ty wasn't "the man" and that their had to be someone behind him, like Avery. I suspect that Avery knows there is someone behind Boyd, and he's trying to suss that out.
  • p.s. Loving the addition of Sam Elliott. Nice to get a full dose of him as a badass. Highlight of the episode.
  • p.s.s. Dillahunt's dialogue is so much like his Deadwood character. You could easily see Ty, saying to Boyd: “Just as a man opposed to inevitable change needn’t invariably be called a Luddite, another choice might be simply to describe him as slow in his processes.”
  • I can't get over Wynne Duffy in his tanning thong, what a striking image! Poor Mike.
  • p.s.s. Dillahunt's dialogue is so much like his Deadwood character. You could easily see Ty, saying to Boyd: “Just as a man opposed to inevitable change needn’t invariably be called a Luddite, another choice might be simply to describe him as slow in his processes.”

    My OCD is requiring me to mention that this would be p.p.s (post post script) and not p.s.s. (although I'm sure it was a joke either way)

    Favorite scene was between a hung over Boyd and Ty "Damn son you like talkin' as much as I do!" and "I don't have the bandwidth for casual conversation"
  • @ksa1001 I agree. Those two Boyd quotes from the conversation with Ty were perfect. I loved that scene.

    I'm such a huge fan of Sam Elliott in this role. He's totally nailing it. I actually think he didn't do anything to Boyd or Ava because, and the show said as much, because he is trying to not be a criminal anymore but will do what he needs to do in order to protect his interests. He was basically walking into Ava's house with all of his Sam Elliott gravitas and literally saying "you're no more a big boy criminal than you were when I met you at 10 years old. Still playing kiddie games." I also like another use of "peacock."

    I loved this episode. You had great fun moments with Raylan messing with Earl and Tyler and at the same time we're seeing the pot stir and thicken. I really think the way they have this set up this could be the best season yet. They are juggling so many agendas and there is so much that we don't know. It could play out any of 100 ways, and with the quality that we are seeing I have real faith that they have a plan and that it will pay off fantastically. I'm so excited for next Tuesday, and I can't remember the last time I was as excited for the next episode of a show.


  • I'm such a huge fan of Sam Elliott in this role. He's totally nailing it. I actually think he didn't do anything to Boyd or Ava because, and the show said as much, because he is trying to not be a criminal anymore but will do what he needs to do in order to protect his interests. He was basically walking into Ava's house with all of his Sam Elliott gravitas and literally saying "you're no more a big boy criminal than you were when I met you at 10 years old. Still playing kiddie games." I also like another use of "peacock."

    Too late to edit, but I forgot to finish the thought, and though it is probably pretty easily extrapolated from the rest of the statement I figured I should finish it. Basically, I feel like this was a tactic to shame and intimidate them into stopping before he had to get his hands dirty dealing with them. He's made his money and established himself and evolved into a businessman who deals in "Pappy Van Winkle on your birthday," not so much with the eye-gougey-outey doo-hickeys.
  • edited February 2015
    I dont know when Peter Weller's 24 appearance was but he had a GREAT episode of Fringe in Season 2(2010). Episode 2.18 White Tulip
  • @Jovial_Falcon Oh shit. I totally forgot that was him. That was a great episode/role. Good call.

    I also thought he was fun as the Yin killer on Psych.
  • Most recently he was on the Sons of Anarchy finale...but always will be this guy


  • Crackpot theory (vague Breaking Bad spoilers):

    Dewey's necklace is going to be the "Leaves of Grass" of the show. Raylan will find the necklace and it will become the linchpin of his investigation against Boyd. Bonus points if the squirrel is transferred to the bathroom for safe keeping.
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    Listening to the podcast now, @A.Ron and @Jim Jones: I took the title "Noblesse Oblige" primarily as Raylan used it, figuratively: "One must act in a fashion that conforms to one's position, and with the reputation that one has earned." (Although Raylan is mostly being sarcastic -- given his daddy issues, it's easier for him to recast Luther claims of paternal duty as fear of Boyd Crowder.) It ties into the overriding themes of Justified: legacy and parenthood. What does it mean to be a father? Does fatherhood change you? (As Boyd had asked Raylan in the previous episode) Can we be better than our fathers, or will we always be paying for or committing the sins of our fathers?

    The ghost of Bo Crowder appeared in the confrontation with Avery, and if Avery ran with Bo Crowder back in the day then he must have known Arlo, and I bet he uses that for some mind fuckery on Raylan when they finally meet.

    Why is Raylan pursuing this one last thing before going home to his daughter? There are a number of reasons, but I'm curious to see where the show lands on Raylan. If he can change, if he can put his family first, if he deserves a happy ending, and what a happy ending even means for Raylan Givens.

    But the term also applies to other characters. Katherine remarks that she knew that Boyd was the man of her dreams when he declares that he is indeed going to rob Avery AND put a bullet in his head. Both the denotative and figurative meanings of the term apply to the marshals and the AUSA who are pursuing Boyd to help Harlan by ridding it of its criminal overlord, as well as to Avery, who uses his wealth and reputation to buy land and intimidate people. If noblesse oblige applies to Avery's interest in real estate, then my crackpot theory is that he's buying land in anticipation of marijuana legalization. Much has been made of the dead coal industry in Harlan and how everyone needs to stop looking back and start looking forward, and there must be a reason why we were introduced to Avery smoking a joint, no? It would be super interesting if the show were to end on an optimistic hope for Harlan, and Ava as a legal Mags Bennett 2.0 would be icing on the cake for me.
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited February 2015
    Pretty sure Sam Elliot's character was the one who snitched on ole girl's dead gangster husband. Probably the reason she wants him dead.
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