There will be Blood

Vasilnate1Vasilnate1 Salem, MA
@A_Ron_Hubbard Sicily is part of Italy, so your good
Murderbear
"because everything would be what it isn't"

Comments

  • JimJim
    edited March 28
    And Puerto Rico is part of the U.S. ;) Yeah, you're right.  I looked it up after the podcast.
    Vasilnate1KingKobra
  • My girlfriend never wants to get milkshakes with me because of this movie.
    Vasilnate1MelonuskJim
  • Gotta be the first There Will Be Blood review to include a MacGyver reference. Bravo!

    MacGyver
    Dummy
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    edited March 29
    Thank you to all the BM members who made this happen. Not all heroes wear capes.


    Except for you, DeanCain78. You probably wear a cape sometimes.
    Dummy
  • sean.raysean.ray Texas
    edited March 29
    I have this question for @Jim and @A_Ron_Hubbard, now that you've seen No Country for Old Men and There Will Be Blood, which should have won best picture? (no Country did win).
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited March 29
    I understood what A.Ron was saying about Ebert possibly not ranking the movie higher because he didn't have kids, and I don't have kids. I say that because I have the audacity to think I am one of those people who can imagine what it might be like to have a kid, and I can appreciate that aspect of stories, but there are many people who have kids and then say, "I had no fucking clue." Sure, there are some aspects I have no fucking clue about, but I've heard people say that and specifically reference how their empathy about child situations seems to have grown. So, it's not that everyone who is child-free can't understand what it's like to have kids... it's just that some people happen to be a tad myopic, I think. 

    That said, who knows why Ebert gave it 3.5 stars. (I know A.Ron was saying that too.)

    One of the reasons I love this movie is it gave me an awareness and appreciation of Paul Dano, a fantastic actor whose Pierre Bezukhov in BBC's recent adaptation of War & Peace lights up my world. Yes, in bold. I need to see more of his movies. I had a dream I met him in a bar and did a poor job of saying how big of a fan I was, because I had only seen 5-10 of his movies.

    Paul Fucking Dano.

    Great podcast. I was most satisfied to hear that they thought it was better than No Country For Old Men, which since it came out the same year I can't help but compare TWBB against.

    I think it'd be safe to say, "We drank your milkshake" as Dry Pie during the Leftovers cast.

    Oh! Holy shit, Jim's impression. I like how he hemmed and hawed saying he hadn't rehearsed when obviously he had rehearsed for hours it was flawless. :P 
    A_Ron_Hubbard
  • Great film, great 'cast.

    Having seen the film several times, I agree with Jim that Plainview is using his son as a prop.  When his friend/Partner asks if is son will be alright and Plainview replies non-nonchalantly "No he won't," I think he is realizing he can no longer efficiently use his son in his business ventures.  He's more regretful that his son - one of his tools or assets - is broken and will need to be replaced, as opposed to having true emotions.  A great performance by DDL.

    I've seen it theorized that the end is a hallucination or something to some degree, because it kind of crosses a crazy line, but I'm not sure I buy it.

    Anyway, thanks to all who commissioned this.
    A_Ron_Hubbard
  • TheEconomistTheEconomist Chattanooga, TN
    I don't view Daniel sending off his son HW in nearly as harsh a lens. In the early 20th century sending a deaf boy to a school for the deaf is probably one of the better things you could do for the kid to get a proper education and develop skills for a more functional life. Perhaps Daniel is rich enough to hire a private tutor but who the hell would want to come live in the Mojave desert on some drilling camp? If anything sending the boy to boarding school at least let him socialize with true peers in similar circumstances.

    I don't think Daniel had the disposition or temperment to deal with HW's condition so it was best for both parties that he was sent off.
  • Great job on the podcast, J & A. I love the comparisons with Breaking Bad, which to me similarly evoked feelings I wouldn't necessarily want to admit to having had (that ending...I'd be lying if I said it didn't make me laugh out loud), and those well-crafted Oh Shit! monents. DDL is like a golem; summoned to a movie to inhabit a role, and then vanishes without a trace.

    Definitely a better movie than No Country For Old Men, IMO.
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    edited March 29
    I remember this being my very first PTA film I ever saw - such an utter masterpiece. 

    @A_Ron_Hubbard   I will link a great video below. This whole analysis is great  - but for those wondering if Daniel loved H.W. or not, skip to 4:55 - he point outs a moment that so many people miss. Personally I think it proves, despite himself, Daniel loved H.W. 



    And yes, you guys need to do Prisoners, like NOW. Show me where to throw the money and i will.


    “No time to squabble Troy, for Greendale on THREE! One, two- Jeff, every second counts. For Greendale on TWO! One-"
  • A few thoughts.

    1. I think that when Plainview is burying his brother the hole is filled up with water not oil. It didn't seem viscous enough.

    2. When the oil drill blows up and catches on fire Plainview's first and major concern is on his son. He runs to save him and runs him to safety. He tries to see what is wrong with him. Then the oil drill becomes such a pressing concern he must deal. He is then happy of course because they struck it gould, but when asked about H.W. he immediately says no he won't be ok. His response is immediate. I feel like he has been thinking about H.W. despite all that is going on around him. Also it seemed like a he tried to protect H.W. from what he was saying in the Ice Cream Shop scene because he covered his face with a napkin to prevent his son from reading his lips. Additionally, he is very caring and understanding with H.W. throughout the entire movie until the last time jump which I found to be interesting. Did his hard lifestyle and karma finally catch up with him. I do not know.

    3. I feel like he did keep a lot of the oil man promises he made to the town. He donated thousands to the church for greedy reasons of course, but we never see that he doesn't increase the wealth and prosperity of the town. In fact, in the baptism scene Eli even states that Plainview has brought wealth and prosperity to their land despite the bad things. I think this drilling operations did lift all boats. In fact, Eli does not come calling until brought low by the great depression. And in that scene the 10,000 dollar was significant I think because that is what Eli originally asked for for the Sunday ranch. He did not even get that for the ranch so I think that was Plainview twisting the knife by saying that is what your brother got for just telling me about it.

    4. Eli and Paul are twins for sure. Eli goes crazy at the dinner table with his family and curses Paul saying he is the one who had to bring that man here. If he is pretending there is no reason to keep the act up for only his family.
    TheEconomist
  • fidoz Houston
    Daniel also informs Eli that Paul went on to be a successful prospector in his own right, just to dig the knife a little deeper. This is also further proof that Eli and Paul are not the same person. 
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    I liked how they got close enough to tying together a nice little religion - American Greed connection. What I would call our Puritan Ethos that is still residual today. Roots and Fruits man. Your wealth / prosperity is proof of your salvation. (Unless you're a woman; then you have to marry into salvation)
    Melia004
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Oh no, "the woman shall be saved in childbirth," as the Good Book says. I suppose that requires marriage.
  • JaimieT said:

    Oh no, "the woman shall be saved in childbirth," as the Good Book says. I suppose that requires marriage.

    Historically women were very likely to die in childbirth. Maybe that quote was taken out of context and it means she gets to go directly from childbed to heaven.

    I just read yesterday that statistically human men have had pretty comparable lifespans throughout human history as long as they made it to adulthood, barring some variables (like the plague).   So an ancient Roman man might make it to modern longevity, granted he survived childhood and military service.  Human lifespan is statistically lower because so many women died in very early adolescence/young adulthood while bearing children.  

    In other words, the human race lives statistically longer now than they ever had because women don't die at 12 popping out their second child who also dies because his mother couldn't take care of him.
    JaimieT
  • trippytrippy Saint Louis
    I view this movie as a blatant and partisan attack on what the liberal media term Big Bowling.  Its bullshit and I refuse to watch this garbage.   Bowling Pin manufacturing is an integral  and fundamental part of the foundation of  the United States.  That pin control communists have used this movie to further their agenda disgusts me.
    A_Ron_Hubbard
    _____
    Nothing says 'This situation is serious' like a corpse on the floor.
    -Anon.
  • MattyWeavesMattyWeaves Mid-State New York
    This is one of my top five movies, and I was ecstatic when it popped up to download. It was awesome too, I'll probably watch the movie again and then give it a re-listen.
    TheEconomist
    Cool. Cool, cool, cool.
  • ThomasThomas North Carolina
    The podcast made me go re-watch it.  Haven't seen it since it came out when I was 19, so much better now that I am almost a full-grown adult.
    JaimieT
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Same, Thomas. I was 20 when it came out. I liked it more at 25+.
  • MelonuskMelonusk Ireland
    Thanks Jim & A., that was a solid podcast. In my take I wanted to mention as well that there was a bit of a confusion with the "Eli & Paul are twin brothers" deal, which was I think unnecessary to the plot - one of the theories is that the cast member that left supposedly scared by DDL was one of the brothers, and as he left unexpectedly Paul Dano ended up playing both parts.

    Anyways, as you seem to be scared by all the other DDL films, you're tempting me to commission My Left Foot :)
  • MoonMan13 Northern Kentucky
    edited April 6
    It's been a while since I've seen this incredible film so I may be incorrect on the details. But I remember thinking that there was a glimmer of redemption in the final scene with his son because Daniel effectively severed ties with him - for his own good. I had a sense that perhaps Daniel knew who he was and that his son was not the same and the best thing for him to do was to get his son away from him. (see: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BreakHisHeartToSaveHim) thoughts?
  • MoonMan13 Northern Kentucky
    Ok so on rewatch it's pretty bad that final encounter. But with the nuances of this film and performance, there's still a little bit of that possibility in there.
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    MoonMan13 said:

    It's been a while since I've seen this incredible film so I may be incorrect on the details. But I remember thinking that there was a glimmer of redemption in the final scene with his son because Daniel effectively severed ties with him - for his own good. I had a sense that perhaps Daniel knew who he was and that his son was not the same and the best thing for him to do was to get his son away from him. (see: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/BreakHisHeartToSaveHim) thoughts?



    The son comes to sever ties with his father, not his father letting his son go because he will be better off. Nah, Daniel was a peice of shit till the bitter end. 

    “No time to squabble Troy, for Greendale on THREE! One, two- Jeff, every second counts. For Greendale on TWO! One-"
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    MoonMan13 said:

    Ok so on rewatch it's pretty bad that final encounter. But with the nuances of this film and performance, there's still a little bit of that possibility in there.

    I think it's a solid concept.  I don't necessarily agree with it, and I don't agree that the son came there to sever ties, I think he came there hoping to either get a blessing to go his own way or sever ties, and his relationship being what it was, much more likely for the latter.  But I could just see a bit of "throw rocks at the dog to make sure it stays away" to the encounter.  
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