New Parent Advice

Hey crew,

Recently found out I'm going to be a dad to a baby girl and I'm 90% excited 10% scared! Lol. Turning 29 this year and I feel ready overall. Just curious if anyone has any advice that's not commonly found in baby books. Any specific advice from parents of daughters?

Thanks!
TaraC73AmbitiousBukkyTravis

Comments

  • DeeDee Adelaide
    edited April 4
    Congratulations! There's a thread in the general forum called How To Raise A Human that you may find useful.
    http://forums.baldmove.com/discussion/3248/how-to-raise-a-human/p1


    I have a teenage daughter, and girls are wonderful, complex people. You're in for joy, excitement, drama. It's like TV! ;-)
  • Oh, perfect, thanks for the link to the thread, @Dee !
    Dee
  • trippytrippy Saint Louis
    Well.... sorry but as Dee pointed out, we've already got a new parent.  As we've reached our quota, you'll have to give your baby away.   Its a shame, really.   But you should have asked first.
    Deephoenyx1023jazzminawaakritenbrinkFreddygguenotTaraC73CoryAmbitiousBukkyTravis
    _____
    Nothing says 'This situation is serious' like a corpse on the floor.
    -Anon.
  • JaimieTJaimieT Houston
    Congratulations!
  • trippy said:

    Well.... sorry but as Dee pointed out, we've already got a new parent.  As we've reached our quota, you'll have to give your baby away.   Its a shame, really.   But you should have asked first.

    Thanks for this Haha
  • voodooratvoodoorat Atlanta
    edited April 5
    i have two daughters (and two sons) and our oldest is a girl.

    not having a girl specifically, but having a child really does change everything.  your possibility space--what you can do at any given time--is drastically reduced as you're suddenly now totally responsible for a tiny human that can't be left alone and can't do anything for themselves, and even what used to be the smallest things that you could do thoughtlessly become something you have to plan...  but it's also sort of rewarding in the sense that all that other stuff you would have otherwise been able to do doesn't seem very important anymore.

    sleep when you can to the extent you can help her mother get some sleep too.  it's a precious resource that you almost certainly currently take for granted.  :D
  • AmbitiousBukkyAmbitiousBukky Madison, WI
    Congratulations!! Advice is great and amazing, but don't fret if what something someone told you doesn't work for your baby girl. You and momma will know what's best as you get to know your daughter. The proud momma of a 2.5 year old who is a Daddy's girl to the fullest, I'm sometimes jealous of it but I LOVE seeing the bond they have. 

    Also let your daughter do everything, even "boy things." She can still be a princess who knows how to change tires. I love to dress up, wear make up, etc. but I also know how to handle power tools, help my hubby out with manual labor, build things, help him out with the cars. I cook majority of the time but he also cooks. I hate the notion that the only thing little girls can be are princesses and cupcakes. Let her get dirty, let her play dress up, let her do whatever she wants, let her be a computer nerd, let her play with trucks, she doesn't have to wear pink all the time.
    gguenot
  • @AmbitiousBukky 100% agree on letting her do everything. I want her to be the strongest, smartest, and have the most self respect for herself while being kind, generous, etc.. I want to take her hiking (which i have a hard time getting my wife to do :) We're playing with colors right now, cause we don't want princess pink and all of that, but still feminine. We basically want to give her enough structure without completely shaping her personality.


    Thanks for the advice!
    AmbitiousBukky
  • TravisTravis CA
    edited May 23
    I'm not a parent, but I do have a dog and thus I am an expert. It's not so hard actually. Just put out a bowl of food twice a day and be sure to check the water level and check it for cleanliness. Be sure to walk your baby, not once but twice a day and try to give them at least a mile (and use a harness, not a neck collar). You will also need to get your baby running to exert its energy or it will start to use that energy to give in to their more mischievous tendencies. Also, buy a good, quality steam cleaner. Don't give your baby a bone when you aren't home because you will not be able to help it if it starts to choke. It's not necessarily a requirement, but it's best to not leave your baby all alone for more than 5 hours at a time. Once you get that down, it's pretty easy. Just pet your baby frequently to show it that you love it and enjoy!

    In all seriousness, congrats! That's wonderful news. I wish I had some great advice, but I don't have any experience babysitting anything smaller than a 3 or 4 year old, much less parenting. I'm sure you'll do great though.
    gguenotFrakkin TTaraC73

    I really want a Grizzly Bear sidekick, but Daniel Rossen won't return my phone calls.

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