American Gods - 102 - The Secret of Spoon (No Book Spoilers)

Dir. David Slade
Writ. Bryan Fuller, Michael Green

Comments

  • edited May 8
    Great episode. I thought the Anansi intro was awesome. 

    The story is kind of plodding, but for me the character moments more than make up for it. I feel like they're trying to put you in Shadow's shoes. He has no idea idea what's going on either. 

    Also, I know that it's unrealistic for Shadow to start trekking across the country with some random dude he met on a plane, but that's why it's fiction.
    Elisapavlovsbell
  • edited May 8
    I can't tell you how much I love the opening credits. It's like if the H&CF credits were directed by David Fincher, with visuals from Seth Ickerman. Love the neon steampunk retro grunge thing. Here's some of Seth Ickerman's work... some shots look nearly identical.




    Elisapavlovsbell
  • Really enjoyed this episode. They are slowly drawing these characters (a signature of BF I recognize from Hannibal) to flesh them out and connect the lines. Visually I am glued, much like I was in Hannibal. Even the enormous amounts NRA of blood call back to that show. While I can guess what the big meeting is, Shadows part to play is still slowly unfolding. Looking forward to the rest of the season.
    pavlovsbell
  • DaveyMacDaveyMac Tokyo
    It does seem like the show is struggling to find the right rhythm, but there's so much that I love about all the individual scenes that it's not bothering me at all. I really enjoyed this episode on the whole. 

    And Czernobog and Zorya were so much fun to watch and their interactions with Wednesday were great. 

    Anansi had a cool introduction as well. I'm looking forward to more "Coming to America" segments.
    aberry89Elisapavlovsbell
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    The first episode was a rocky landing but this one REALLY pumped the breaks, which I greatly appreciated. And i am started to get more of a complete picture of these gods and the shows more overarching themes. 

    btw - it's hilarious how literally EVERY woman gives Shadow the, image
    DaveyMacElisapavlovsbell
    “No time to squabble Troy, for Greendale on THREE! One, two- Jeff, every second counts. For Greendale on TWO! One-"
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    Also, does anyone else have a strong hankering to watch some Hannibal after each episode!?? XD


    Jovial_Falcon
    “No time to squabble Troy, for Greendale on THREE! One, two- Jeff, every second counts. For Greendale on TWO! One-"
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    edited May 9
    aberry89 said:Also, does anyone else have a strong hankering to watch some Hannibal after each episode!?? XD



    Oh yes.
    Hannibal is more psychological, emotional, purple and operatic, European-influenced, and the aesthetics are more my bag. American Gods is brash, loud, crass, humorous, open -- sprawling even -- which makes sense as they're going for an American story. I enjoyed this episode more than the premiere overall, but some scenes still felt flat (Shadow packing up his house) or overly long and dragging (Czernobog). I loved Cloris Leachman and Gillian Anderson, but I thought Peter Stormare was OTT. I did get a kick out of Americanizing the ubiquitous Seventh Seal playing-chess-with-Death reference by changing it to checkers.

    Although I (think) have a good idea of what's going on, I still think it's a weird choice to deliberately be opaque and confusing. This felt more like the second half of a two-hour premiere because I don't think that the setup of a war between old and new gods was firmly established until "Lucy Ricardo" attempted to recruit Shadow to their side. And while this episode seemed to confirm that the show has been from Shadow's perspective so far, and thus a very limited POV, he didn't start asking questions until now. Which is a tad frustrating because he is the main protagonist, and I'm not sure what his motivation is. 
    Elisaaberry89DaveyMac
    Stop pissing in my soup and saying you're cooling it off.
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    @GredalBee The title sequence was created by Elastic, who did H&CF. Good catch! They also did Westworld, The Americans, The Leftovers, Game of Thrones, True Detective, Daredevil, and The Crown, among others, so yeah, they seem to be the studio to go to for imagery and iconography-focused sequences.
    Elisa
    Stop pissing in my soup and saying you're cooling it off.
  • Joe_BearJoe_Bear Boston
    Man, I really wanted it to get better with another episode, but the show keeps bumming me out with how hollow and formless it feels. I'm a big fan of the book, and plenty of other shows that are campy/strange/less than perfect, but I guess I just feel like this show is faking it the whole time. Being edgy for the sake of being edgy, or stylized for the sake of being stylized, but all of it just feels useless because it's not held down by anything of real weight. Maybe this is how everyone felt after seeing Batman vs. Superman? 

    I was actually kind of surprised that A Ron didn't just completely sh*t on it.

    It also may very well be that the actor playing Shadow is what is throwing me off so much, but in a way I guess he perfectly represents what the show feels like to me; someone trying so hard to be cool that he completely misses the point. 


    Elisa

  • aberry89aberry89 California

    aberry89 said:

    Also, does anyone else have a strong hankering to watch some Hannibal after each episode!?? XD



    Oh yes. Hannibal is more psychological, emotional, purple and operatic, European-influenced, and the aesthetics are more my bag. American Gods is brash, loud, crass, humorous, open -- sprawling even -- which makes sense as they're going for an American story. I enjoyed this episode more than the premiere overall, but some scenes still felt flat (Shadow packing up his house) or overly long and dragging (Czernobog). I loved Cloris Leachman and Gillian Anderson, but I thought Peter Stormare was OTT. I did get a kick out of Americanizing the ubiquitous Seventh Seal playing-chess-with-Death reference by changing it to checkers.

    Although I (think) have a good idea of what's going on, I still think it's a weird choice to deliberately be opaque and confusing. This felt more like the second half of a two-hour premiere because I don't think that the setup of a war between old and new gods was firmly established until "Lucy Ricardo" attempted to recruit Shadow to their side. And while this episode seemed to confirm that the show has been from Shadow's perspective so far, and thus a very limited POV, he didn't start asking questions until now. Which is a tad frustrating because he is the main protagonist, and I'm not sure what his motivation is. 



    EXACTLY my thoughts. I wish it's style was more Hannibal-esque, I don't feel like just because it's set in America it needs to be so gaudy. But your right, Hannibal had an air of European sophistication to it.  

    I loved Cloris Leachman, she is always pretty great. Gillian as Lucy pretty flat for me, and I love the SHIT out of both those women. It was just kinda offputting and a weird Lucy impression. @pavlovsbell 
    pavlovsbellElisa
    “No time to squabble Troy, for Greendale on THREE! One, two- Jeff, every second counts. For Greendale on TWO! One-"
  • MrXMrX CO
    aberry89 said:

    aberry89 said:


    I loved Cloris Leachman, she is always pretty great. Gillian as Lucy pretty flat for me, and I love the SHIT out of both those women. It was just kinda offputting and a weird Lucy impression. @pavlovsbell 


    To be fair, my takeaway from her in the books is that it is supposed to be a disturbing/weird/offputting Lucy that talks to Shadow.

    Agree with others that this is a bit of a hot mess, but McShane is so damn good that I'm sticking with it. Looking forward to more Orlando Jones too ... that Coming to America scene was cool, he really showed some range in that monologue.
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