What Happens When We Die?

gguenotgguenot CA
edited May 30 in General
Let Neil DeGrasse Tyson explain it beautifully

https://www.facebook.com/therealskepticus/videos/646207882248471/

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Comments

  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    Yeah, that's all the arguments that made me feel better about dying and coming to grips with my mortality.  But I gotta ask, who the hell put that  terrible new age hippie music behind the interview?  
    Also, I've not really come to grips with my mortality.  It still makes me feel dreadful to think about, but intellectually I just put it aside.  I have an irrational fear of spiders and heights too, so I try not to think about them too much either.  Seems healthy enough.
    bazjensterjazzminawaNoel
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    No matter what happens when you die, we all die and there's not a lot we can do about it. So I don't worry about it too much.
  • I have an irrational fear of spiders and heights too, so I try not to think about them too much either.  Seems healthy enough.
    Spiders are everywhere. How do you handle it when you see one? When I had an irrational fear of spiders I had to kill them every time with my heart racing, it didn't feel healthy. 

    There was a computer game I played about evolution, it was pretty simple. Find food, then find a partner to mate and then you can change your DNA and evolve - then find food...and so on. Starting as a wingless insect was often frustrating. You're slow and all predators in the vicinity will kill you to feed on you. The most upsetting part was being killed by a humanoid. Insects didn't count as food for him, there was no benefit from killing an insect that tried to avoid him, it was just pointless. Made me real angry, what an asshole. It made me also question why I go berserk when I see a spider that was just unlucky to cross my way. So I stopped killing spiders, instead I capture them in a glass and throw them out of the house. With this non-violent way I have a feeling of control over that creature and no longer feel threatened. Today spiders almost don't bother me at all.   
  • @toncica you burn the house down of course.

    @A_Ron_Hubbard i guess that means someone needs to commission Arachnophobia
    akritenbrink
  • podcartfanpodcartfan Cincinnati
    I think about death a lot. Not in a fearful way but more of a general "we all die one day and there isn't anything we can do about it" way. I had an epiphany a while back where I realized I'm not mad about not existing in the past before I was born so why be mad/scared about not existing when I die.

    I'm going creamation unless I can be buried in a box directly in the ground. I don't want to slowly decompose in a casket in a vault. Bring on the worms.
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    I will say- somewhere around when I turned 40, I started thinking about life in terms of how much time I might have left and what I want to do with it, rather than seeing it as a kind of limitless horizon. I'm 44 and hubby will be 49 in a few weeks, and he's starting to have health issues common to older folks, which he kind of dropped out of taking his medicine for. I had to give him a big lecture about how he needed to manage things better because I don't want to be a widow in my 50s. But I don't think much about my own death, probably because I've never really believed in God or afterlife, or maybe just because I am a self-absorbed person who pretty much lives in the moment haha
  • I'm going creamation unless I can be buried in a box directly in the ground. I don't want to slowly decompose in a casket in a vault. Bring on the worms.

    Whenever I drive by a cemetary all I can think about is how big a waste of space they are. For that reason I always assumed I'd go cremation myself but NDT makes a good case for being buried in the video. I guess the trick is owning enough land that  you can legally get buried on it? Not that I ultimately care what happens to me as I'll be dead!
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    I had a friend who passed recently and she had it arranged to be cremated and spread over the water in the San Juan Islands. She never married and her parents and brother had the same done. She was the last to go and now they are all "together" again in a beautiful location.
    cdrivegguenotNoel
  • What is happening while I'm alive? All I can do is watch. Either there's something to observe after death, or there's nothing observing.
  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    Besides the pain that might come with it, I have absolutely no fear of my own death, but I do think a lot about my family and friends and how their deaths will/would have massively devastating impacts on me.

    I can't say that I've ever felt suicidal, but I've often visualised being the 'first to go' amongst my nearest and dearest to avoid the heartache, I guess that's quite a selfish view on things. With grandparents and parents still around that's incredibly unlikely.
  • I'm still so afraid of dying. I used to cry to my mom about it when I was a kid. What could she say? It's going to happen regardless.

    Obviously I'm still struggling on how to cope with it. It's less of a fear of what will happen to me... because I don't think there is anything afterward. More of an: I exist in my own head and all of these thoughts, fears, and emotions will just no longer be around to have any of those things. It makes no sense. How could I, thinking and breathing and laughing and working and loving just not BE anymore? 

    This is also why I don't often get high anymore, lol.
    akritenbrink
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    I think more about what  might happen if my husband dies before me. He's 5 years older, ex-smoker, did every drug in the 90s, and he has some chronic health conditions. Nothing unmanageable, and he doesn't have any bad habits any more, other than the occasional weed or pipe smoking (maybe once a month) but you never know. In some ways I almost hope he does go first just because I make more money and I manage our money so it would be hard for him (I do have life insurance though). I don't actually know how either one of us would survive in the economic situation in Seattle without the other one's income. But if I go first, I feel like he would find a way to survive. If he goes first, I would probably either move into a condo or move back home.

    Speaking of which, does anyone else ever have the conversation with your spouse/partner about whether you should date or marry someone else if they die? :P
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    Melia004 said:

    What is happening while I'm alive? All I can do is watch. Either there's something to observe after death, or there's nothing observing.

    DEEP
    Melia004
  • Welp, opening this thread was a mistake.  According to some, the singularity may be here sooner than later.  I'm down for some kind of "San Junipero" type cross over.
    JaimieT
  • Speaking of which, does anyone else ever have the conversation with your spouse/partner about whether you should date or marry someone else if they die? :P

    My wife and I are ok with it, but we both feel it would be VERY tough and take a long time to be in the place where we could date again.
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    gguenot said:

    Speaking of which, does anyone else ever have the conversation with your spouse/partner about whether you should date or marry someone else if they die? :P

    My wife and I are ok with it, but we both feel it would be VERY tough and take a long time to be in the place where we could date again.
    I told hubby to go ahead and find someone new, just make sure she isn't too trashy, hahahaha.

    I don't know if I would date or get married again if my marriage ends. I don't care that much about dating. Maybe I would just move in with my sister. Don't tell my sister, hahaha
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Well, that escalated quickly.
    jazzminawaamyja89TaraC73
  • I always remember the "Education of Little Tree" where someone is buried underneath a tree, and mentioning how it will give the tree a few more years of life/growth. It probably won't happen because of laws, but I think that's what I'd like to happen to me when I die. I have a love for trees, and knowing that I'm in some way part of the tree I'm buried under would be pretty awesome. 
    podcartfan
  • Not to get too morbid, but has anyone thought about donating their body to science? That's something I'm considering. So many options, too.
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    edited June 3
    Under the assumption I couldn't change or alter the physical world I'd love to be able to travel space and time if I die. Be able to check in on my family, go watch the D-day landings, see the person who invented X, go fly through the solar system and see Jupiter or Saturn up close. Basically life would would the ultimate vacation but still able for you to see and spend time with your loved ones.
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    edited June 2
    @daveymac ;I would want to do that, as it seems the most helpful thing to do after I die. But i think louie c.k. might have ruined it for me XD I am still a donor on my driver's license...


    DaveyMactrippy
  • Haha, I'd forgotten about that clip. I've thought about that kind of stuff before.

    I used to be a donor when I had a U.S. driver's license, but I don't think I have anything like that on my Japanese I.D. I guess I'll have to look into it.
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    edited June 4
    I suppose in a effort to lighten things up a bit, regardless of what actually happens when you die what fictional version of the afterlife do you prefer/secretly hope might be true? Could be from a book, movie, show, your own imagination. I don't know if anyone's actually read this book, but I kind of like the final result of the afterlife in Firewing (the purgatory and hell parts are pretty bad though).
  • voodooratvoodoorat Atlanta
    I don't believe in an afterlife or really in spirituality in general, I think what you see is what you get.  In a way it's terrifying, of course, because the idea of ceasing to exist is as incomprehensible as suddenly existing (which also happens all the fucking time, it's among the most common miracles).  In another way it's kind of liberating though because there is no greater stakes, life is what you make of it.  I've always thought it's weird that "you only live once" is a kind of idiot-mantra to indulge in risky behavior--if anything, knowing you only live once and you're not going to get another chance to get it right should make you tend towards mindfulness and pragmatism to avoid screwing it up, to try to optimize your life choices to get the most bang for your buck as it were.

    All that said, I am someone who personally lives a little in the future and suffers from anxiety.  I worry about things about which I have little to no control and I plan for futures that may never happen.  I've mitigated that somewhat over the years (I was raised by a very pragmatic dad who barely got to enjoy his retirement due to sudden onset of lymphoma--we benefited from his pragmatism but I wish he'd had more of a chance to enjoy things since it seems like he spent a lot of time and mental energy preparing for retirement and for all of our (I have 3 siblings) well-being and was kind of robbed of what he "deserved".  So I guess I'm torn between the side of me that anticipates (mostly bad) things and the side that tries not to.

    All I know for sure is that I'll be pissed if I realize I'm going to die before GRRM finishes the fucking books.  
    trippyhisdudeness915
  • @ggalasso@gmail.com You might want to check out the company Bios Urn, it's a similar concept. You can put your ashes into a special made container with some tree seeds, bury it and it will basically turn you into a tree. This is what I like the most at the moment. I love trees, and while I don't know if I believe in an afterlife per se, this looks like an amazing way to 'live on' so to speak. Trees can live hundreds of years long, and knowing I'm part of that somehow gives me comfort. It also filters the air, gives home to birds and other animals, and it's not creepy like a cemetery.
  • @Reni obvioisly you've never been in a haunted forest ;)
  • toncica said:


    Spiders are everywhere. How do you handle it when you see one? When I had an irrational fear of spiders I had to kill them every time with my heart racing, it didn't feel healthy. 

    There was a computer game I played about evolution, it was pretty simple. Find food, then find a partner to mate and then you can change your DNA and evolve - then find food...and so on. Starting as a wingless insect was often frustrating. You're slow and all predators in the vicinity will kill you to feed on you. The most upsetting part was being killed by a humanoid. Insects didn't count as food for him, there was no benefit from killing an insect that tried to avoid him, it was just pointless. Made me real angry, what an asshole. It made me also question why I go berserk when I see a spider that was just unlucky to cross my way. So I stopped killing spiders, instead I capture them in a glass and throw them out of the house. With this non-violent way I have a feeling of control over that creature and no longer feel threatened. Today spiders almost don't bother me at all.   
    My roommate used to do that and it used to piss me off so much lol. I'm strongly in the "its humans responisbility to kill any spider it sees" camp personally. On the topic of death, when you die your brain stays active for a couple minutes so in my mind that means that bare minimum is that we will all think theres a lovely afterlife for those 7 minutes before losing consciousness and never knowing that life didn't actually exist. Not sure if thats how the science actually works but it sure makes me feel better lol
  • @KingKobra No, but surely if I'm just all on my lonesome as a single tree in some backyard, that's not so creepy? Or maybe I should amp it up and get my tree planted in a cemetery, double the haunting skillz.
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)

    I always remember the "Education of Little Tree" where someone is buried underneath a tree, and mentioning how it will give the tree a few more years of life/growth. It probably won't happen because of laws, but I think that's what I'd like to happen to me when I die. I have a love for trees, and knowing that I'm in some way part of the tree I'm buried under would be pretty awesome. 

    You could just have someone do it and not tell anyone.
  • akritenbrinkakritenbrink Lynnwood, WA (Seattle area)
    Alkaid13 said:

    I suppose in a effort to lighten things up a bit, regardless of what actually happens when you die what fictional version of the afterlife do you prefer/secretly hope might be true? Could be from a book, movie, show, your own imagination. I don't know if anyone's actually read this book, but I kind of like the final result of the afterlife in Firewing (the purgatory and hell parts are pretty bad though).

    I am so earthbound that I can't even think of an answer to that. Also, what happens to me after I die does not freak me out. I will be dead, what do I care. I just worry about what would happen to others, especially my husband and to a lesser extent what would happen at work if I died because I know a lot of details no one else knows about how to do my job.
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