The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 40th anniversary

seanrayseanray Texas
edited January 14 in Movies
I just finished watching this for the first time. Wow. I now understand why this is so highly regarded. One of the scariest most disturbing things I’ve ever seen. The set design and camerawork are amoung the best I’ve ever seen for an independently funded film. Just terrific, and truly horrifying. Does anyone know what they have added for the 40th anniversary, if anything?
Chinaskihisdudeness915Michellecdrive

Comments

  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    yeah it's definitely a classic. the grittiness and raw sound is so good. hammer to the head with shaking boots gets me every time :#
    hisdudeness915
  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    I remember watching it when I was far too young and being kind of disappointed because I was expecting this blood filled gore romp, but with age I've come to appreciate it for being exactly the opposite of that. A masterpiece of the imagination, your own mind makes it the horror show that it is thanks to all of the excellent technical filmmaking that has been mentioned above!
  • I think the biggest surprise for me was that it was the first “scary” movie I remember seeing that was like 90% in broad daylight. I had always thought that it had to be dark outside for the boogeyman to come out but this movie proved me wrong. Great movie and that hammer strike is still one of the most terrifying moments I’ve ever seen and stuck with me for a few days. 
  • MichelleMichelle California
    I watched it once & can never do it again.  I had the most terrifying nightmare that night and it scarred me for life. 
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    I get the Heebie Jeebies with that whole TX backwoods genre of horror.

    This video always spooked me too.  


  • Another thing that is so effective is the sound design. Especially the atonal score or whatever the hell Hooper used to get those sounds. I heard he cut a trombone in half with a saw.
     
    SPOILERS FOLLOW.......................................


    But holy hell, really unnerving, and the final dinner scene with grandpa. It’s so ghastly, but so damn funny.
    Chinaski
  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    I think the biggest surprise for me was that it was the first “scary” movie I remember seeing that was like 90% in broad daylight.. 
    yeah.. same. the fact that it was light when most of the bad shit went down really f'd with my feeble little mind at the time :s
    hisdudeness915
  • Natter CastNatter Cast San Francisco, CA
    edited January 18
    Hooper was a genius. You can definitely see which parts of Poltergeist were his and which were Spielberg's.

    Had a chance to see this in the theater recently. I've seen the film maybe a dozen times, but only once or twice in the theater back in the day.

    It's a brilliantly executed film, but not perfect It's light on plot and I the last 30 minutes or so degenerates into torture porn. Once Franklin dies (uh, spoilers?) we have no narrative agency with the heroine. The dinner scene is indeed harrowing, but that's all it is, so people can be forgiven for getting a bit bored with it. Me, I like torture porn so make of that what you will :)

    For anyone who hasn't seen it, I can definitely recommend the first sequel. He does evolve his storytelling quite a bit. You have multiple parallel storylines, so the action doesn't feel as compressed. It's played much more for humor, recognizing that the audience wants to laugh at these things. And there's a bigger effects and location budget.

    It's a different tone. If you love the first one I could see thinking that the second is a little too Sam Raimi...but that was the style of the time.
    Chinaski
  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    For anyone who hasn't seen it, I can definitely recommend the first sequel. He does evolve his storytelling quite a bit. You have multiple parallel storylines, so the action doesn't feel as compressed. It's played much more for humor, recognizing that the audience wants to laugh at these things. And there's a bigger effects and location budget.

    It's a different tone. If you love the first one I could see thinking that the second is a little too Sam Raimi...but that was the style of the time.
    this was one of the first 'humor horror' movies i remember watching as a kid. the poster art alone is very nostalgic for me
    Natter Cast
  • If Hooper directed TCM2, I’m in. Might watch it this weekend.
  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    edited January 19
    sean.ray said:
    If Hooper directed TCM2, I’m in. Might watch it this weekend.
    he did. just dive in with an open and clouded mind ;)
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