303 - Assured Destruction

Director: Thor Freudenthal
Writers: Hallie Lambert and the usual crew

Comments

  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    edited April 26
    For the purposes of writing credits, from now on assume “the usual crew” means Ty Franck and Daniel Abraham (James S. A. Correy), and Mark Fergus and Hawk Ostby (the developers), and any extra writers will be listed by name. 
    Elisa
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    Thanks, man, I was too busy discussing politics on the forum to do my damn job.
    TxSandMan
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    No worries. 
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    Cotyar is fucking cold as ice. 
    ElisarkcrawfMelonusk
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    Amos is from Baltimore apparently, I demand to see a flashback to Amos in the The Wire right now, get on it internet. 
    JaimieTThe_Third_ManElisahisdudeness915Melonusk
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    @A_Ron_Hubbard nice work on getting more screeners. 
    Elisa
  • Errinwright is savage at the end of this one with the 2 million body count guilt trip.

    Despite him being a monster, the Jules-Pierre and Mei stuff really bummed me out with him essentially reliving what he let happen to his daughter. Somehow I think continuing the experiment is a little more up for debate than he thinks.
    ElisaFlukesMelonusk
  • Does Mars still have second strike capability after the railgun strike on their nuclear platforms?  Because, if they do, destroying those platforms isn't all the helpful.  If they don't it essentially means Mars needs to surrender or Earth will just nuke them until they glow and the Secretary General would have to know that.


    Despite him being a monster, the Jules-Pierre and Mei stuff really bummed me out with him essentially reliving what he let happen to his daughter. Somehow I think continuing the experiment is a little more up for debate than he thinks.
    You'd think he would know it's probably too late when a ship is being dispatched to take over.  
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Not a lot to say about this episode, huh?

    It was really good. I really like the Jules-Pierre turn; a lesser show would not have done that.

    Also A-Ron keeps saying, "They set this up last season," but Mei being Asian was set up and paid off within the same book.

    In the podcast Jim said, "Some of that is mildly interesting and some of that is [something else]." No Jim, it's all mildly interesting! That's not how mildly interesting works! ;)
  • I was just thinking how this show does everything right and I just don't have that much to say about it, lol.  I'm enjoying the podcast, of course, so I'm glad I caught up with this season.  I like that we're seeing this interplanetary war being waged in a realistic way, with the Roci crew kind of trapped in the middle.  They've got more to balance this season, like I don't believe we've seen the OPA, even though Fred Johnson has given them the protomolecule, right?  Like, what are they up to?  And I don't believe we've ever seen the Mars leadership, have we, in scenes similar to Errinwright and the generals?  Not a lot to complain about.  Basically I just want to see more of this world.
    JaimieTElisa
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    ken hale said:
    I was just thinking how this show does everything right and I just don't have that much to say about it, lol.  I'm enjoying the podcast, of course, so I'm glad I caught up with this season.  I like that we're seeing this interplanetary war being waged in a realistic way, with the Roci crew kind of trapped in the middle.  They've got more to balance this season, like I don't believe we've seen the OPA, even though Fred Johnson has given them the protomolecule, right?  Like, what are they up to?  And I don't believe we've ever seen the Mars leadership, have we, in scenes similar to Errinwright and the generals?  Not a lot to complain about.  Basically I just want to see more of this world.

    In the back of my mind is the fact that Naomi was never proven to not be OPA. It's been so long since that suspicion from the crew, but she's a liar, so.
  • JaimieT said:
    Not a lot to say about this episode, huh?

    It was really good. I really like the Jules-Pierre turn; a lesser show would not have done that.

    Also A-Ron keeps saying, "They set this up last season," but Mei being Asian was set up and paid off within the same book.

    In the podcast Jim said, "Some of that is mildly interesting and some of that is [something else]." No Jim, it's all mildly interesting! That's not how mildly interesting works! ;)
    I like the turn Jules-Pierre Mao took (actually having humanity) but at the same time it seems against his character.  He was the one that said the protomolecule was worth the life of his daughter.  It's something I just say to myself, he had a change of heart seeing a child go through convulsions like the young boy did, and I'm okay with it. I feel like the main scientist working there, that everybody thought was decent to begin with, is really the monster on the planet.  He is clearly under Jules-Pierre Mao but I have a feeling that he's going to defy his word and do something stupid.

    Alkaid13 said:
    Cotyar is fucking cold as ice. 
    As soon as I saw them both alive and a UN ship coming to get them I had a bad feeling about the Martian guy.  He is cold as ice but that's exactly why Chrisjen relies on him as a spy.  He can do the things he needs to to protect the plan.  What would have happened if the Martian was alive and just blurted everything out to Admiral Nguyen.  And the other question I have is Nguyen working for Errinwright and his private agenda?  
  • chriskchrisk Indianapolis
    This may be a dumb question,but I don't recall it being mentioned  - were the Mars nuclear platforms manned? And the shots they got off at Earth - were those automated in any way? I assume a first strike would be by command, but I could see some sort of auto-response once they're fired upon.

    Just wondering if anyone ever made a conscious choice to kill people in this whoie exchange.


  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited May 1
    JaimieT said:
    Not a lot to say about this episode, huh?

    It was really good. I really like the Jules-Pierre turn; a lesser show would not have done that.

    Also A-Ron keeps saying, "They set this up last season," but Mei being Asian was set up and paid off within the same book.

    In the podcast Jim said, "Some of that is mildly interesting and some of that is [something else]." No Jim, it's all mildly interesting! That's not how mildly interesting works! ;)
    I like the turn Jules-Pierre Mao took (actually having humanity) but at the same time it seems against his character.  He was the one that said the protomolecule was worth the life of his daughter.  It's something I just say to myself, he had a change of heart seeing a child go through convulsions like the young boy did, and I'm okay with it. I feel like the main scientist working there, that everybody thought was decent to begin with, is really the monster on the planet.  He is clearly under Jules-Pierre Mao but I have a feeling that he's going to defy his word and do something stupid.

    You should meet my dad! Very successful entrepreneur and now investor. He's also great with kids under the age of 10. He loves them, and they love him back. I should add he was a children's pastor for 15+ years to explain why he's interacting with kids and how I've observed it.  

    But if any child of his grows up and starts questioning his ideology, they get shouted down. And if they really question his ideology, like "wanting to be gay," or in Julie's case, joining a faction of people that aim to destroy his whole agenda, they get vague yet sobering threats about being disowned.

    My dad has the emotional maturity of a child. Thus he connects with children really well. He doesn't with emotionally mature adults. I wouldn't be surprised if it took a child for Jules-Pierre Mao to think, "What if this happened to me"? I know the show had him looking at a picture of his daughter, but that's the part that needs to be explained away in my head canon, not his turn. 
    letrbuck2006Flukesken hale
  • chrisk said:
    This may be a dumb question,but I don't recall it being mentioned  - were the Mars nuclear platforms manned? And the shots they got off at Earth - were those automated in any way? I assume a first strike would be by command, but I could see some sort of auto-response once they're fired upon.

    Just wondering if anyone ever made a conscious choice to kill people in this whoie exchange.


    I don't know that they ever 100% said that it was or wasn't manned people on the platforms but the way I took it was that they were unmanned stations.  I could be completely wrong with this thinking but that was the way I understood it.  
  • Alkaid13 said:
    Amos is from Baltimore apparently, I demand to see a flashback to Amos in the The Wire right now, get on it internet. 
    His real name is Amos Sobotka. 
    Elisa
  • I thought that Earth's numerical advantage falling from 5:1 to 3:1 was too extreme. It just makes the "let's continue the naval war with Mars" camp seem suicidal (maybe that was the point?). Unless Earth's remaining ships are all Death Stars or something, they should probably be begging Mars for peace.

    Doctor_Nick
  • You have to give Errinwright props for being such an effective and efficient shitweasel, but his plans are starting to fall apart.  Volovodov is going to catch him at something,  Avasarala has proof of his treason, and Souther is going to expose his goon.  I'd be very surprised if he makes it out of this season.  Shawn Doyle has done a great job with this character.  
    ElisaThe_Third_ManFlukes
  • Doctor_NickDoctor_Nick Terminus
    Well, in reality, those platforms almost certainly aren't close enough to each other for the seconds delay to matter, the last platform wouldn't have known the other 4 had been destroyed.  They've been playing pretty fast and loose with communications on the show in any case, Jules-Pierre Mao on Io and Erinwright on Earth can't be having the real time conversations that they're showing us.  

    chrisk said:
    This may be a dumb question,but I don't recall it being mentioned  - were the Mars nuclear platforms manned? And the shots they got off at Earth - were those automated in any way? I assume a first strike would be by command, but I could see some sort of auto-response once they're fired upon.

    Just wondering if anyone ever made a conscious choice to kill people in this whoie exchange.







  • JaimieT said:
    Not a lot to say about this episode, huh?

    It was really good. I really like the Jules-Pierre turn; a lesser show would not have done that.

    Also A-Ron keeps saying, "They set this up last season," but Mei being Asian was set up and paid off within the same book.

    In the podcast Jim said, "Some of that is mildly interesting and some of that is [something else]." No Jim, it's all mildly interesting! That's not how mildly interesting works! ;)
    Mildly interesting works how I say it works, @JaimieT!  Gotta keep 'em guessing.
    JaimieTFlukes
  • Well, in reality, those platforms almost certainly aren't close enough to each other for the seconds delay to matter, the last platform wouldn't have known the other 4 had been destroyed.  They've been playing pretty fast and loose with communications on the show in any case, Jules-Pierre Mao on Io and Erinwright on Earth can't be having the real time conversations that they're showing us.  

    chrisk said:
    This may be a dumb question,but I don't recall it being mentioned  - were the Mars nuclear platforms manned? And the shots they got off at Earth - were those automated in any way? I assume a first strike would be by command, but I could see some sort of auto-response once they're fired upon.

    Just wondering if anyone ever made a conscious choice to kill people in this whoie exchange.







    I think it's all been tight-beam recorded messages or texts, right? Nothing real-time that I can remember. Other than people in very close proximity, the only real-time conversation I can recall is Avasarala and her husband when he was on Luna and there was a noticeable and frustrating lag. Granted, my memory could be faulty. I think they've done a great job with being as faithful to the realities of the distances and communications challenges as they can be and still allow for dramatic effect.
    ElisaFlukes
  • Doctor_NickDoctor_Nick Terminus
    Yeah, I think you're right.  I rewatched and Mao breaks into Erinwright's message as if he's interrupting it to give his ultimatum and then hangs up, but it could very well have just been him sending a voicemail.

    Well, in reality, those platforms almost certainly aren't close enough to each other for the seconds delay to matter, the last platform wouldn't have known the other 4 had been destroyed.  They've been playing pretty fast and loose with communications on the show in any case, Jules-Pierre Mao on Io and Erinwright on Earth can't be having the real time conversations that they're showing us.  

    chrisk said:
    This may be a dumb question,but I don't recall it being mentioned  - were the Mars nuclear platforms manned? And the shots they got off at Earth - were those automated in any way? I assume a first strike would be by command, but I could see some sort of auto-response once they're fired upon.

    Just wondering if anyone ever made a conscious choice to kill people in this whoie exchange.







    I think it's all been tight-beam recorded messages or texts, right? Nothing real-time that I can remember. Other than people in very close proximity, the only real-time conversation I can recall is Avasarala and her husband when he was on Luna and there was a noticeable and frustrating lag. Granted, my memory could be faulty. I think they've done a great job with being as faithful to the realities of the distances and communications challenges as they can be and still allow for dramatic effect.

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