Nanette - Hannah Gadsby (on Netflix)

edited June 29 in Other TV
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  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    It’s definitely on my list. I’ve loved her every time I’ve heard her on the Guilty Feminist podcast.
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  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    @JaimieT you might like this.

    What is it, just a comedy set? (I don't have Netflix to look.)
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  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    JaimieT said:
    @JaimieT you might like this.

    What is it, just a comedy set? (I don't have Netflix to look.)
    It's comedy but also storytelling, and it gets serious at some points and then circles back to comedy. She talks about coming to terms with her identity as a lesbian, with a nice side trip into art history (sounds odd but it was actually really interesting). There was something about some of the stuff she was saying that reminded me of some of the stuff you've talked about here.

    It sounds great! I'm putting it on my "soon" list. (Shhh don't tell anyone I have a regular list and a "soon" list.) Thanks!
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  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    "Soon" became now. Wow, that was a lot of great stuff to think about. That was like a social sermon. Absolutely powerful. I don't follow the comedy scene too much, but as for my perspective on comedy, this will always stay with me as one of the greatest sets I've ever seen.
    Demic
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  • davemcbdavemcb Melbourne
    edited July 5
    This was incredible and so powerful whilst also having some genuinely funny moments. Even just to think about producing this show is extremely gutsy let alone putting on the biggest service in the world. 

    I hope that Nanette can help as many people who are just learning to accept themselves as they are, I hope I never have to have the conversation with my girls like Hannah's mother did about regretting trying to push them into "normalcy" when it was very obvious even to her mother that this was a mistake. When my best mate came out to me it wasn't a problem because it didn't change who she is or our friendship, but I can see a lot of similarities between Hannah's mother and her parents. Not maliciously but they always pushed her towards wearing dresses etc when she didn't want to and it obvious from a younger age that she hated that, even though their relationship is still great and there is an acceptance now but the early and mid 20's had some shaky moments. 
    JaimieT
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Yes, I appreciated the part about how she wasn't telling the whole story. It's nice to hear about mothers coming around. My mother will never accept me being gay. She will go to her deathbed saying it's wrong. But I can imagine a situation where she is less afraid of it, only saying it's wrong when asked, and that means we can at least have a basic, working relationship.
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  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    Just got round to watching this, so good.

    Until I grew my hair out in my mid teens and realised that you could dress like a tomboy without actually having to wear ‘men’s clothing’, I too had to put up with a lot of that gendered bullshit. A lot of things she was saying about that really hit home, although thank god I never had to go through the abuse and violence that she discusses.

    The part about her never having come out to her grandmother hit way too close to home. I’m out to my maternal, English grandma with absolutely no problems, but I’m unsure if I’ll ever be able to come out to my Spanish Catholic abuela. I’m just absolutely terrified of the inevitable rejection from someone who right now regards me as one of her most precious possessions.


    davemcbJaimieT
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  • davemcbdavemcb Melbourne
    @amyja89
     that's terrible... I am so sorry you have to worry about such things!

    My family is Catholic, but remarkably unperturbed about people being gay. But maybe you have had more evidence from abuela that she would not approve.
    Having grown up Catholic I naturally have a very large extended family and we have had a number of the family that have come out and no one has really cared about it. Welcoming in partners etc but we did have a number of elderly members of the family recently actively working for a No vote in the same sex marriage vote which was all just about hiding behind the churches teachings. 

    My sister has been living in Madrid for the last 2 years and she would be the most catholic of my immediate family but she has been shocked by how indoctrinated the Spanish Catholics are and the level that they take their faith. So I can understand how that would make it tough to come out to.  
    amyja89
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    @amyja89 - I didn't come out to my grandma either. When I came out on Facebook I mentioned she was hidden from my post but people could feel free to spread the word, lol. So someone told her, but it wasn't me, and I don't want to know anything about it. I'm not on the best of terms with her (I'm pretty sure she knew I was gay before I did and treated me and my friends coldly a few times; at the time I just thought she was acting weird), so of course it's not the same situation. 
    amyja89
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    Probably the most eloquent, devastating and honest pondering on feminism and qmisogny. Some righteous anger here, and honesty it was nice to see a woman unafraid of saying exactly what she wants, without fear of going over the line or making people feel uncomfortable. 
    JaimieT
  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    JaimieT said:
    @amyja89 - I didn't come out to my grandma either. When I came out on Facebook I mentioned she was hidden from my post but people could feel free to spread the word, lol. So someone told her, but it wasn't me, and I don't want to know anything about it. I'm not on the best of terms with her (I'm pretty sure she knew I was gay before I did and treated me and my friends coldly a few times; at the time I just thought she was acting weird), so of course it's not the same situation. 
    Oh I’m sure there must be a degree of that going on too. I’m 28 and haven’t had a ‘boyfriend’ since I was about 12, she’s not dumb. There is just something very safe feeling about staying in that no mans land of no confirmation from either side, you know? 
    JaimieT
  • edited July 17
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  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    I just got finished watching this after hearing accolades here on the forums as well as on podcasts like /Film and such. Good god, what a powerhouse of a show. That was amazing. I literally finished it a few minutes ago, so I don't have much more to say about it, and in all honesty, I am not sure I ever will entirely feel like I can or would even necessarily want to. Best thing I have watched on Netflix in...well as far as I can remember really. 
    JaimieTamyja89
  • JoshTheBlackJoshTheBlack Atlanta, GA
    I really don't understand why Christians (or other highly religious people of some other religions) are the ones who care the most (in a negative way) about homosexuality. Like even if I was just to look at it from a totally selfish point of view, gay marriage takes nothing away from me, a woman married to a man. But religion never really took hold in my brain long term so there's probably something i don't get. Like... I just say to all these Christians... Worry about yo self. Lol
    Here's a bit of "Southern" Christian perspective on it.  Before you chastise me, understand that these views are not my own and in no way reflect my own views on homosexuality or gay marriage.

    I was raised Christian, and spent a lot of my early life in church and studying the bible.  The bible calls homosexuality a sin.  Unnatural, abomination, yada yada.   Several of the churches that I attended in the late 90's and early 00's would occasionally preach sermons on homosexuality, and one of the points that was often raised was that societal acceptance of homosexuality was historically a precursor to the downfall of a civilization.  Usually they would reference heavily from the story of Sodom and Gamorrah as evidence of God's wrath against a civilization that embraced homosexuality, and then they would name the fall of Rome as proof that this was unequivocally true.  I think a lot of American Christians believe that if we, as a nation, allow and embrace homosexuality it will ultimately lead to the downfall of America, and the judgement of God.  When the more "Christ-like" of the Christians are railing against homosexuality, they see it as a literal fight for survival.  Not just their own, but yours too.  Of course, you also get the crazy "Christians" like Westboro who are genuinely awful people bent on stirring controversy.

  • ShumShum Utah
    I really don't understand why Christians (or other highly religious people of some other religions) are the ones who care the most (in a negative way) about homosexuality. Like even if I was just to look at it from a totally selfish point of view, gay marriage takes nothing away from me, a woman married to a man. But religion never really took hold in my brain long term so there's probably something i don't get. Like... I just say to all these Christians... Worry about yo self. Lol
    Here's a bit of "Southern" Christian perspective on it.  Before you chastise me, understand that these views are not my own and in no way reflect my own views on homosexuality or gay marriage.

    I was raised Christian, and spent a lot of my early life in church and studying the bible.  The bible calls homosexuality a sin.  Unnatural, abomination, yada yada.   Several of the churches that I attended in the late 90's and early 00's would occasionally preach sermons on homosexuality, and one of the points that was often raised was that societal acceptance of homosexuality was historically a precursor to the downfall of a civilization.  Usually they would reference heavily from the story of Sodom and Gamorrah as evidence of God's wrath against a civilization that embraced homosexuality, and then they would name the fall of Rome as proof that this was unequivocally true.  I think a lot of American Christians believe that if we, as a nation, allow and embrace homosexuality it will ultimately lead to the downfall of America, and the judgement of God.  When the more "Christ-like" of the Christians are railing against homosexuality, they see it as a literal fight for survival.  Not just their own, but yours too.  Of course, you also get the crazy "Christians" like Westboro who are genuinely awful people bent on stirring controversy.

    A lot of religions also think of marriage as a religious institution that is being high jacked by secular society, and they don't understand why we need to change the definition of marriage to accommodate gay men and women when common law grants all the same privileges without calling it "marriage."  There is also a fear that once the definition of marriage is changed to include gay couples, it will eventually be illegal for ministers to only marry straight couples, and they will either need to agree to mary gay couples or stop marrying people altogether.  Similar to Josh, I'm not saying I agree with these arguments, but I do think it's important to understand the issue from a religious point of view if you actually want to effectively persuade people that are on the fence.
  • edited July 19
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