World Wide Web founder reveals plan to reinvent the internet

https://www.fastcompany.com/90243936/exclusive-tim-berners-lee-tells-us-his-radical-new-plan-to-upend-the-world-wide-web

"This week, Berners-Lee will launch Inrupt, a startup that he has been building, in stealth mode, for the past nine months. Backed by Glasswing Ventures, its mission is to turbocharge a broader movement afoot, among developers around the world, to decentralize the web and take back power from the forces that have profited from centralizing it. In other words, it’s game on for Facebook, Google, Amazon. For years now, Berners-Lee and other internet activists have been dreaming of a digital utopia where individuals control their own data and the internet remains free and open. But for Berners-Lee, the time for dreaming is over."

A decentralized internet eh?   I wonder how Richard (Silicon Valley) would feel about that?  :)

Seriously though, any thoughts on this project (https://solid.inrupt.com/ )?
telephoneofmadnessJaimieTFreiberg

Comments

  • lol, that's got to be viral marketing for Silicon Valley, right?
    TaraC73Dee
  • So, rather than 2 billion people storing their data on Facebook's servers, 2 billion people would store their data on Inrupt's servers and let Facebook access the data? Why is that better? I'm probably missing something here.
    TaraC73
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited October 4
    So, rather than 2 billion people storing their data on Facebook's servers, 2 billion people would store their data on Inrupt's servers and let Facebook access the data? Why is that better? I'm probably missing something here.

    Maybe I read another article, but it's a totally different thing. He's recoding it. Hell, maybe I'm just optimistic. In my mind I made up a metaphor of it being like streaming a movie versus torrenting it. No one owns the data if everyone does.
  • I don't think the objective is for inrupt to host everyone's data.  Inrupt is the company that is backing the development of Solid - the platform to decentralize the web.   I don't fully understand it all, but from what I gather the objective is to allow users to own their data, while allowing developers to write application that access that data.   The user's data will be owned by the user and can be stored in PODs.   Users can find PODs providers, or set up their own servers to host their PODs.   The users would also have control over who you share your data with (and which sets of data).

    Here is another article I found on the subject:
    https://www.adweek.com/digital/the-decentralized-web-gets-a-shot-in-the-arm-from-tim-berners-lees-new-platform-solid/



    JaimieTtelephoneofmadness
  • edited October 5
    aki said:
    I don't think the objective is for inrupt to host everyone's data.  Inrupt is the company that is backing the development of Solid - the platform to decentralize the web.   I don't fully understand it all, but from what I gather the objective is to allow users to own their data, while allowing developers to write application that access that data.   The user's data will be owned by the user and can be stored in PODs.   Users can find PODs providers, or set up their own servers to host their PODs.   The users would also have control over who you share your data with (and which sets of data).

    Here is another article I found on the subject:
    https://www.adweek.com/digital/the-decentralized-web-gets-a-shot-in-the-arm-from-tim-berners-lees-new-platform-solid/
    So it seems like, rather than going to facebook.com/me, people would go to me.com/facebook. The Facebook app would run on my web server, where my data was stored, and access my data. But if the Facebook app can still access my data, I don't see how this is better than the current system, unless the idea is that there is going to be some kind of licensing that makes it illegal for Facebook to harvest users' data and profit from it. If so, I think this model would have a hard time competing with the current internet because that huge source of income would be lost. I'm not sure how feasible it would be to run something like Facebook or Google on subscriptions.
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  • I remember that after Google acquired Youtube, they locked me out of my Youtube account. The only way I could get back in to access the lists I'd made was to sign up for a (fake) Google account and associate it with my Youtube account. If Inrupt/Solid could prevent companies holding users' data to ransom like that, that would be an advantage.
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  • akiaki
    edited October 5

    @akritenbrink:

    I assume you are talking about General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).  I heard that some states in the US maybe looking at implementing their own versions of it, so I looked it up, and sure enough, California passed the "California Consumer Privacy Act" of 2018  or CCPA) which will take effect on January 1, 2020:

    https://channels.theinnovationenterprise.com/articles/if-you-re-gdpr-compliant-are-you-california-ready

    So perhaps there is a little hope?

    The alternative would be for people to pay for the storage of their data and use of applications.  But I suppose at some point it probably sounded crazy for people to pay for television that you could get over the air via antennas free of charge :)

  • Ugh. Now we pay for cable with money and ads. Maybe we get the worst of both worlds, pay with money and advertising to store our own data privately too. That would be fun. 
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    I think the cable analogy is flawed, so I wouldn't let that make one pessimistic about it. Cable is more comparable to the current internet. This next thing is anti-capitalist, decentralized. Frankly we can't conceive of it because we are so capitalist. 
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  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited October 6
    JaimieT said:
    I think the cable analogy is flawed, so I wouldn't let that make one pessimistic about it. Cable is more comparable to the current internet. This next thing is anti-capitalist, decentralized. Frankly we can't conceive of it because we are so capitalist. 
    Well, that's how the internet was in the beginning. Then came AOL and it was all downhill from there, ha

    I didn't read this specific article, but I read another article about this a few weeks ago. This new internet would make it impossible. It's not just a reboot. Have you read anything on it? 

    Capitalism seems like it can't not win, but technology will eventually find a way, given we don't go extinct. Maybe this is it.
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