Creepy Midwestern Dolls

The boys said that everyone in the town should have known what those creepy dolls were, so they shouldn't have been so puzzled. 
That makes a lot of sense, and I guess it's an oversight on the writing.

BUT, when Jim and A. Ron said they KNEW what those dolls were and that they were very popular in the midwest, please know guys, that the majority of the viewing audience only saw CREEPY ASS DOLLS. 

So my question is, when Ali (I'm not even going to try to write his first name) found the dolls, since you knew what they were, did it still freak you out? That was the intended reaction, I believe. So, even if you did know what they were, it was still weird, right? I mean,  you probably said: Why would those dolls (that I've seen before) be at a crime scene? So I wonder if it still had the intended effect.

I just wanted to throw that out there. I was REALLY surprised when you both knew what they were. I stand by my suggestion that most of us didn't, and it immediately felt weird/cultish/psycho-spherish.


Dee

Comments

  • rhcooprhcoop Knoxville, Tn
    Hollyoak said:
    The boys said that everyone in the town should have known what those creepy dolls were, so they shouldn't have been so puzzled. 
    That makes a lot of sense, and I guess it's an oversight on the writing.

    BUT, when Jim and A. Ron said they KNEW what those dolls were and that they were very popular in the midwest, please know guys, that the majority of the viewing audience only saw CREEPY ASS DOLLS. 

    So my question is, when Ali (I'm not even going to try to write his first name) found the dolls, since you knew what they were, did it still freak you out? That was the intended reaction, I believe. So, even if you did know what they were, it was still weird, right? I mean,  you probably said: Why would those dolls (that I've seen before) be at a crime scene? So I wonder if it still had the intended effect.

    I just wanted to throw that out there. I was REALLY surprised when you both knew what they were. I stand by my suggestion that most of us didn't, and it immediately felt weird/cultish/psycho-spherish.


    Cornhusk dolls are a native american and very southern thing as well.  They are all over down here.
  • HollyoakHollyoak Baltimore
    rhcoop said:
    Hollyoak said:
    The boys said that everyone in the town should have known what those creepy dolls were, so they shouldn't have been so puzzled. 
    That makes a lot of sense, and I guess it's an oversight on the writing.

    BUT, when Jim and A. Ron said they KNEW what those dolls were and that they were very popular in the midwest, please know guys, that the majority of the viewing audience only saw CREEPY ASS DOLLS. 

    So my question is, when Ali (I'm not even going to try to write his first name) found the dolls, since you knew what they were, did it still freak you out? That was the intended reaction, I believe. So, even if you did know what they were, it was still weird, right? I mean,  you probably said: Why would those dolls (that I've seen before) be at a crime scene? So I wonder if it still had the intended effect.

    I just wanted to throw that out there. I was REALLY surprised when you both knew what they were. I stand by my suggestion that most of us didn't, and it immediately felt weird/cultish/psycho-spherish.


    Cornhusk dolls are a native american and very southern thing as well.  They are all over down here.
    Interesting, rhcoop. My family is very southern (Alabama) and I've never seen or heard of them before. Maybe it's a very regional thing.
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    I mean, in the context, it's creepy, in the same way like a trail of barbie dolls leading to a dead boy would be, or a playground. Playgrounds aren't creepy, but at night, with a single swing creaking in the wind, with ghost children singing "la la la la laaaa laaaaaaa"? Pretty creepy. The doll itself doesn't read creepy to me, because growing up they were all over my grandma's house and cabin. If anything, they read "kitschy" to me.
    rhcoopHollyoakMichelle
  • edited January 16
    I doubt it's very regional, probably the opposite - I'm from Eastern Europe and my grandma made these during my childhood too. I don't find them creepy at all. I guess wherever there's corn, people made these. Maybe not nowadays, but a couple decades ago for sure.
    rhcoopHollyoak
  • MichelleMichelle California
    My grandma had a couple back then too, and an aunt had one.  I think they were just an '80s trend.  In the context of the show though it's kind of a brilliant prop and tie in with the mystery.
    Hollyoak
  • kuman07kuman07 Kansas City
    Maybe its more a generational thing. I was born in '87 in Midwest and raised here and I don't remember anything like that at all.
    Hollyoak
  • I don't remember those things either, and much of my childhood (1908s) was in Southern Indiana.  But my family wasn't from there originally, so it might be a thing that was a thing, but we didn't know it.
    Hollyoak
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