College Admissions Scandal.. Thoughts?

ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
Aunt Becky! WTF?!
Elisa
«1

Comments

  • Join us over in the non-political news thread, we've been discussing there!

    http://forums.baldmove.com/discussion/5821/non-political-news-thread#latest
    ChinaskiElisa
  • ChinaskiChinaski Santa Cruz, CA
    edited March 14
    ah ok. thanks for the heads up. i seldom step foot in the political threads.

    edit: or should say, 'seldom step foot in threads with 'Political' in the title haha

  • It's supposed to be non-political news, but there is a lot of grey area...
  • Yeah I've been chiming in over there on this - hopefully now that I see this others will and we can continue here since it gets into *political* a bit
  • Chinaski said:
    Aunt Becky! WTF?!
    I was definitely in the same boat, but I find it fascinating that she's the figure head of the scandal when her husband is the head/founder of Mossimo brand! It speaks to how many people know and "like" her because of TV. And also that it's "Felicity Huffman" not "William H Macy" or "Felicity Huffman and William H Macy" but maybe I need to read the details more and the moms were the only ones involved?
    BourbonQueen
  • One of the most disgusting parts to me, was the fact that they were paying the guy in a tax fraud scheme as a charity payment. 
    BourbonQueenmylifeaskirkTravis
  • BourbonQueenBourbonQueen Dallas, TX
    I think it’s gross Lori’s daughter has boosted her career and made money as a YT and instagram influenced by playing the “college kid” with sponsorships from everything from Sephora, Smile Club, etc. 
    mylifeaskirk
  • HunkuleseHunkulese Québec, Canada
    The main thing that's surprising to me is that I would have thought that a celebrity could get their kids into any college they want by making a "donation". 
    TravisCeciliaM
  • HunkuleseHunkulese Québec, Canada
    Chinaski said:
    Aunt Becky! WTF?!
    I was definitely in the same boat, but I find it fascinating that she's the figure head of the scandal when her husband is the head/founder of Mossimo brand! It speaks to how many people know and "like" her because of TV. And also that it's "Felicity Huffman" not "William H Macy" or "Felicity Huffman and William H Macy" but maybe I need to read the details more and the moms were the only ones involved?
    The explanation I saw for why Macy wasn't getting charged is that the vast majority of the hard evidence only implicated Huffman. There wasn't enough to go after Macy, even though there were definitely transcripts of incriminating conversations he had.
    Travis
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    I just can’t get worked up about this. Of all the terrible things rich people do, this is pretty low down on the scale for me.
    johnnytruantDoubleA_Ron
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    Same @Dee, this seems like an almost novel level of corruption given the ludicrous shit that goes on all the time on the global scale these days. Compared to all the stuff in “This Giant Beast” this just seems like such small potatoes; why aren’t more people talking about companies literally robbing entire countries blind? That seems infinitely more meaningful than whatever banal nonsense celebrities get up to. 
    Dee
  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    I agree that it feels kind of small potatoes compared to the sort of corruption that is getting uncovered pretty much daily of late, but it still really pisses me off that these rich celebrities and business moguls are happy to cheat the system to get their average kids in to great schools, potentially taking the place away from a far less privileged kid who has worked their ass off to get the chance.

    Felicity Huffman's daughter was set for life from the day she was born, others aren't that lucky and for them a stellar college degree is the key opening up a new, better future.
    Travisrhcooppavlovsbelltelephoneofmadnesshisdudeness915CeciliaM
  • tom_gtom_g WV
    edited March 14
    Alkaid13 said:
    Same @Dee, this seems like an almost novel level of corruption given the ludicrous shit that goes on all the time on the global scale these days. Compared to all the stuff in “This Giant Beast” this just seems like such small potatoes; why aren’t more people talking about companies literally robbing entire countries blind? That seems infinitely more meaningful than whatever banal nonsense celebrities get up to. 

    The stuff in the This Giant Beast is alarming - that sort of expose should light a fire under the collective butts of 'people', but, the link below was four years ago.  Not sure if anything changed.

    John Oliver

    Too comfortable.  I think I'm buying a Samsung S10 for my son this weekend.
  • Hunkulese said:
    The main thing that's surprising to me is that I would have thought that a celebrity could get their kids into any college they want by making a "donation". 


    When i thought of either really wealthy people or celebrities, in terms of getting their kids into college, i thought it went something like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cknU_6coybo

    My only thing is i don't think the kids involved should be expelled from the school.  They're already in and even in the case of Aunt Becky's daughter who clearly has made it public that she's at school to party and not for academic reasons, I'd still say she can stay since the school did admit her.  Now, maybe they keep a closer eye on here and make sure that she's completing her own work and if her grades aren't up to par, then they can ask her to leave based on academic performance.  But to flat out expel is wrong (even if that meant that someone who was qualified to get in got rejected).

    Overall, this situation just seems stupid to me.  I'm kind of surprised that the university wasn't willing to just accept the kids because their parents could pay a full tuition and not have to give them any sort of scholarship (unless i'm entirely wrong and these kids were actually receiving scholarships and weren't paying).  I know i saw they got recruited under false pretenses, but doesn't necessarily mean there were scholarships involved.

    But at the end of the day, this is what life can be about.  It easily can be, who you know and not what you're actually capable of.


  • TravisTravis CA
    edited March 14
    RE: the "not a big deal" of it all, one reason that I am glad this is being made a deal is that it's the only way to fix the disparity between white collar crime and non-white collar crime. The only way that rich people stop running rough-shot over the system is if there are consequences. It's part of just not accepting that "this is the way it is and the privileged just get to take and take..." I mean, I don't need it plastered all over the news at the expense of more important things, but people love their celebrities and that's just how that goes. I started off thinking that it wasn't a thing, but we are talking about multi-layered fraud here. Bribes, tax fraud, and in at least some cases these are state institutions. No one is bleeding in the street, but if we want a fair meritocracy in that system (and we should) we do have to squash this. In a entertainment sense, I really like Macy and Huffman and I was inclined to think "oh they're just parents trying to give their kids an advantage like any parent would if they had the resources" but this really is some serious stuff, and if they weren't super rich and if people didn't inherently like them they would be totally screwed. Let's see how they come out. Probably with a moderately reddened wrist and that should kind of piss us off. Not "burn down Beverly Hills" style, but it's a thing. 
    Kate23pavlovsbelltelephoneofmadnessDeehisdudeness915
  • MrXMrX CO
    edited March 14
    Dee said:
    I just can’t get worked up about this. Of all the terrible things rich people do, this is pretty low down on the scale for me.
    It's a problem because it's one way rich people propograte their stranglehold on society, and make it harder for people to lift themselves out of lower classes. If Aunt Becky and others are bribing their unqualified kids into college, taking away spots from qualified low-income students, it just furthers the cycle of economic oppression. This and hundreds of other "not that big of a deal" stuff that the 1% do add up to a big fucking deal, as @Travis articulated nicely.
    TravisChinaskipavlovsbelltelephoneofmadnessMarcihisdudeness915weeniegirl
  • @MrX Thanks, man! Nicely articulated yourself. Cheers!
  • It's also good that this is getting attention because it's shining a light on so-called legitimate ways of bribing your kid into college - i.e. donating $10 million for a new wing in the library.

    Ron Wyden is now planning to introduce a bill to eliminate tax write-offs for donations made before or during a donor's child enrolling.

    https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/433960-top-senate-dem-to-introduce-bill-ending-tax-break-for-college-donations
    Travispavlovsbell
  • Idk why but this story hit a nerve with me. It’s just so blatantly done. Faking a disability to get more time for SAT is awful on so many levels.

    Doctoring photos to pretend your student excels at a sport they have never done. All to get into USC?  

    And the hypocrisy of this coming from some so-called liberals who preach equal opportunity. 

    Maybe because my daughter is finishing up her junior yr of high school and will be applying soon it is extra disgusting to me. The degree that she gets (and she will earn) will ultimately be cheapened by all this kind of stuff. College already seems like expensive daycare for young adults sometimes. But it still is worth it for career benefit now if you are smart about it. 

    ....And I don’t think the students involved in this scandal should get a total free pass. They had to be somewhat complicit in the sports scams and the test taking.  I think losing student status at their school should be sufficient and they can try again somewhere else on their own merit.   
    rhcooptelephoneofmadness

  • ....And I don’t think the students involved in this scandal should get a total free pass. They had to be somewhat complicit in the sports scams and the test taking.  I think losing student status at their school should be sufficient and they can try again somewhere else on their own merit.   
    In general I totally agree, but I do have empathy for the kids who didn't know. I heard one of the stories about a kid where his mother had a "pro" take the SAT on her kid's behalf, but made sure that her kid took the test too and would be left to think that the score was theirs. Can you imagine finding this out? I mean, you think you got this awesome SAT score that you could be proud of and that you earned your way into this great school only to find out that it was all BS, and simultaneous to it you're mom might be going to jail and you're being painted as a privileged asshole when you just had no idea and thought you earned it. Man, that's heavy. I mean, you've got to reassess all of these admissions and most likely kick at least almost all of them out, but I do have a lot of empathy for the ones who didn't know it was happening. The ones who were complicit, not so much, but I do feel bad for the ones who weren't.
    majjam0770
  • This scandal has something for everyone, s/b truly bipartisan. 
    Doing nothing as a result would be a real force multiplier on the damage done; I want to stay tuned. 
  • Idk why but this story hit a nerve with me. It’s just so blatantly done. Faking a disability to get more time for SAT is awful on so many levels.

    Doctoring photos to pretend your student excels at a sport they have never done. All to get into USC?  

    And the hypocrisy of this coming from some so-called liberals who preach equal opportunity. 

    Maybe because my daughter is finishing up her junior yr of high school and will be applying soon it is extra disgusting to me. The degree that she gets (and she will earn) will ultimately be cheapened by all this kind of stuff. College already seems like expensive daycare for young adults sometimes. But it still is worth it for career benefit now if you are smart about it. 

    ....And I don’t think the students involved in this scandal should get a total free pass. They had to be somewhat complicit in the sports scams and the test taking.  I think losing student status at their school should be sufficient and they can try again somewhere else on their own merit.   
    I've known a lot of 1%ers or people that pretend they are 1%ers. They literally think they are above the rules. It seems the though process is, I made all this money (even though they often didn't), therefore I am successful, and being successful is good, so whatever I'm doing to increase my success is therefore also good. 

    Like, I don't think the people in this scandal are mustache twirling supervillians. They just know that obviously their kid deserves to go to UCLA or wherever more than some random, not rich kid. It must be true! Their kid is more special than any other kid! 
    Travis
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    Front, back, side....same as it always was

  • rhcooprhcoop Knoxville, Tn
    amyja89 said:
    I agree that it feels kind of small potatoes compared to the sort of corruption that is getting uncovered pretty much daily of late, but it still really pisses me off that these rich celebrities and business moguls are happy to cheat the system to get their average kids in to great schools, potentially taking the place away from a far less privileged kid who has worked their ass off to get the chance.

    Felicity Huffman's daughter was set for life from the day she was born, others aren't that lucky and for them a stellar college degree is the key opening up a new, better future.
    Exactly.  Those rich kids took up spots for kids that have worked far harder than they have.  

    Before I get accused of making assumptions, if these kids actually worked hard, they would be able to get in to these schools without bribery.

    Same thing happens in football and bball recruiting.  Some parents will pay a hefty sum to a recruiting service for an extra star to get added to their kids profile. 

    Happens all the time. 
    pavlovsbellChinaskitelephoneofmadnessmajjam0770
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    edited March 14
    I’m not saying don’t get worked up about low level corruption like this, by all means rich people almost to a tee get away with this shit all the time and it’s infuriating. I’m saying why is the low level stuff the only things people seem to get worked up about? Tons of CEOs and politicians do way worse on the reg and suddenly everyone pays attention when it’s some celebrity they know doing something relatively petty by comparison? Are we going to sustain this level of anger or forget it when this particular case is finished? What are we focusing our outrage on: things we can’t do anything about or things we can? If this is the spark for a bigger change in society then great, if not then what are we wasting our time here for?
    Travis
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    edited March 14
    I don't think this is "small potatoes," and I strongly disagree with people who respond to outrage about any injustice, regardless of how insignificant it seems to them, with the admonition that there are more important things to focus on. We can focus on and care about many things, and we should. 

    This is shocking because of the way these incredibly privileged people committed fraud to get their undeserving kids into schools. Legacy admissions have always skewed the demographics of post-secondary institutions -- it is affirmative action for rich, white people. Same with multimillion dollar donations. Fail sons like George W. and Jared Kushner get into Harvard and Yale either because of the legacy policy or massive donations. Harvard admits more legacy students (of whom 93% are white) than black students, and let's not even get into the Asian-American Harvard scandal. But these parents went beyond that, and it's infuriating, especially when you hear them laughing about it.




    Affluent white kids are already advantaged over lower-income kids because even their public schools are better funded, have more resources, and offer more AP courses and extracurriculars to give them the advantage when applying to colleges. This current scandal is simply one more way in which the wealthy perpetuate oligarchy or plutocracy and white supremacy.

    What angered me most was the disability fraud aspect because there is always a backlash to this kind of thing, and the backlash is usually directed at the already disadvantaged and marginalized. Students with actual disabilities already experience difficulty getting accommodations, and now these jerks are exploiting that. 


    ChinaskiMrXtelephoneofmadnessmajjam0770tom_ghisdudeness915TravisOldGriswold
  • HunkuleseHunkulese Québec, Canada
    edited March 14
    MrX said:
    Dee said:
    I just can’t get worked up about this. Of all the terrible things rich people do, this is pretty low down on the scale for me.
    It's a problem because it's one way rich people propograte their stranglehold on society, and make it harder for people to lift themselves out of lower classes. If Aunt Becky and others are bribing their unqualified kids into college, taking away spots from qualified low-income students, it just furthers the cycle of economic oppression. This and hundreds of other "not that big of a deal" stuff that the 1% do add up to a big fucking deal, as @Travis articulated nicely.
    I'm not saying it's not a problem, but the effect this has on low-income students trying to get into these colleges is basically zero. There are far, far, far greater problems with the current education system. Places like Georgetown and Harvard aren't accessible for qualified low-income students unless they are so exceptional that they're able to get massive scholarships.

    The amount that private institutions are charging for tuition is a way bigger problem than the tiny, tiny, tiny, number of people cheating to get in. The whole scandal doesn't track at all on the list of things people should be focusing their attention on to improve anything. It's really only a thing because Aunt Becky is involved.
    Dee
  • Hunkulese said:
    MrX said:
    Dee said:
    I just can’t get worked up about this. Of all the terrible things rich people do, this is pretty low down on the scale for me.
    It's a problem because it's one way rich people propograte their stranglehold on society, and make it harder for people to lift themselves out of lower classes. If Aunt Becky and others are bribing their unqualified kids into college, taking away spots from qualified low-income students, it just furthers the cycle of economic oppression. This and hundreds of other "not that big of a deal" stuff that the 1% do add up to a big fucking deal, as @Travis articulated nicely.
    I'm not saying it's not a problem, but the effect this has on low-income students trying to get into these colleges is basically zero. There are far, far, far greater problems with the current education system. Places like Georgetown and Harvard aren't accessible for qualified low-income students unless they are so exceptional that they're able to get massive scholarships.

    The amount that private institutions are charging for tuition is a way bigger problem than the tiny, tiny, tiny, number of people cheating to get in. The whole scandal doesn't track at all on the list of things people should be focusing their attention on to improve anything. It's really only a thing because Aunt Becky is involved.

    Most expensive private schools give need-based aid that has nothing to do with merit-based scholarships. The reason they are so expensive in part is because they admit so many kids from rich families that can afford the full tuition.
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    MrX said:
    Dee said:
    I just can’t get worked up about this. Of all the terrible things rich people do, this is pretty low down on the scale for me.
    It's a problem because it's one way rich people propograte their stranglehold on society, and make it harder for people to lift themselves out of lower classes. If Aunt Becky and others are bribing their unqualified kids into college, taking away spots from qualified low-income students, it just furthers the cycle of economic oppression. This and hundreds of other "not that big of a deal" stuff that the 1% do add up to a big fucking deal, as @Travis articulated nicely.
    Oh, I get that. But rich people have been buying their dumb kids’ way into schools forever. Most are just smart enough or rich enough to pay for a library or whatever. I’m not saying it’s not a big deal, I’m saying I personally can’t be arsed getting mad about something that isn’t going to stop just because two rich white ladies got caught. Rich people will continue to buy an Ivy League education for their kids - they’re just going to be more careful about how they do it. This is not going to be some kind of watershed moment. 

    I am, however, enjoying the memes. 
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    I don't think this is "small potatoes," and I strongly disagree with people who respond to outrage about any injustice, regardless of how insignificant it seems to them, with the admonition that there are more important things to focus on. We can focus on and care about many things, and we should. 
    I think you guys are reading are something I didn’t say. I am not admonishing anyone for being angry about this. I’m saying rich people do really shitty things all the time, and get away with them, and they will continue to do really shitty things and get away with them because it’s gone on for so long that there’s no real way to reverse that privilege without a literal revolution. 

    For me personally, I’m tired of being constantly angry about shitty rich people behaviour. I find it exhausting. I’m making no judgements on other people’s anger. I would love for something to be done about the huge privileges rich people have over the rest of us, and maybe these two will be made an example of, but that’s not going to stop the Trumps and Kochs and Zuckerbergs or even the Clooneys and Roberts’s and Pitts from exerting their privilege to get their kids into the schools of their choice. 
Sign In or Register to comment.