Abdicating the throne?

Since Aemon Targaryen abdicated his right to the throne when his older brother Aerion died, why couldn’t Jon abdicate his claim to the throne in favor of Daeny?  I thought the backstory material in the DVDs also referenced other examples of kings stepping down in the old days.

Plus, if Jon could use his own death as justification for breaking a vow to the Night’s Watch, couldn’t he use the same rationalization to state he cannot be the king?
majjam0770

Comments

  • All the ChickensAll the Chickens Birmingham, AL
    MarkTodd said:
    Since Aemon Targaryen abdicated his right to the throne when his older brother Aerion died, why couldn’t Jon abdicate his claim to the throne in favor of Daeny?  I thought the backstory material in the DVDs also referenced other examples of kings stepping down in the old days.

    Plus, if Jon could use his own death as justification for breaking a vow to the Night’s Watch, couldn’t he use the same rationalization to state he cannot be the king?
    I think that we're WAY past that now, but Aemon Targaryen (Maester Aemon) publicly refusing his right to the throne wasn't really enough. His father sent him to the Citadel to be a Maester as a boy because they had a dangerous amount of  male Targaryen heirs at the time.

    When he was a young man serving as a Maester, he was summoned to the Great Council and where he was offered the crown. He refused, ceding the throne to his younger brother Aegon V ("Egg" from Dunk and Egg novels). Aemon then joined the Nights Watch to actually make it legally certain that there wasn't some civil war where they used his claim to usurp his brother.

    I guess what I'm saying is that Jon telling people he doesn't want the throne is the same thing as abdicating the throne. He could still be used to overthrow Dany's rule. He knows it, Dany knows it, and Maester Aemon knew it when he was in that position.
    TravisMarkTodd
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