Chernobyl Episode 4:The Happiness of All Mankind

gguenotgguenot CA
edited May 28 in Other TV
Another great episode. A real gut punch with the outcome of the delivery
AussieGreg
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Comments

  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Brb need to watch some video's of my sister's adorable dog being happy. 
    rkcrawf
  • JamesJames southern California
    After watching the fates of the firefighters and others last week, they give us the systematic extermination of the abandoned pets. I knew it had to end with puppies.

    I knew what the fate of Ludmilla's baby would be -- I think I read it online -- but why is it that the pets affect me more?
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    Man. That opening was incredible. 
  • edited May 28
    Oh man, that was a rough one to get through. I knew they would have to get to the pets at some point, and I've been dreading it. I had to just cover my eyes for a lot of it. I think it's so affecting because they trust us and we can't explain to them what's going on. It was the humane thing to do, but ugh, so awful and upsetting.

    I hadn't read up on what happened to Lyudmilla's baby, so that was rough too. Yeah, she had been warned, but I don't think she fully understood what she was doing. The citizens were so used to being lied to for any number of reasons, and I think she just didn't grasp the danger she was putting herself and the baby in. Then to be OK because the baby absorbed most of the radiation... the guilt must be unbearable.

    Then the "bio-robots" getting their instructions on what to do in their 90 seconds - how nerve wracking to have to go out there and shovel that graphite off the roof with probably very limited movement and vision in that inadequate looking "protective" gear. Just harrowing.
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    James said:
    After watching the fates of the firefighters and others last week, they give us the systematic extermination of the abandoned pets. I knew it had to end with puppies.

    I knew what the fate of Ludmilla's baby would be -- I think I read it online -- but why is it that the pets affect me more?

    My uncle was telling me some things about Vietnam and I noticed he was more upset about killing animals. My guess is animals are more upsetting because they're innocent, because they're a reliable source of joy for us our whole lives, and because to contemplate the death of a person is too close to contemplating our own mortality. It's too bleak.
    MarciCapeGabe
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited May 28
    They really should have called this episode "Systematic People/Puppy Murdering", and used Comic Sans for the font whenever possible.
  • Good episode, probably the least best so far, but still good. The puppy thing was way too predictable imo. I wonder what happens to those 90 second runners. The last scene, cut to black, was a good ending cut.
    CapeGabe
  • As a lifetime owner of dogs when I watched the episode at 3 in the morning all I wanted to do was wake up the dog and hug her.

    I wish the guys they sent onto the roof bothered me more but it was the dogs.
  • BroRad33 said:
    Good episode, probably the least best so far, but still good. The puppy thing was way too predictable imo. I wonder what happens to those 90 second runners. The last scene, cut to black, was a good ending cut.
    The puppy thing should have been *worse.*. That was a true story, but although they filmed an even worse part of that encounter they cut it. They didn't want to be too gratuitous. 

    This is the actual account of a liquidator, it may be predictable because horrific things in life are horrific. 

    If this was a war movie, and we saw it implied that a soldier rapes a woman, that would also be predictable. The closer to real it is, the more obvious it becomes. 
    EsotericEric
  • It's incredible that we can watch the Ukrainian documentary "Chernobyl 382" on YouTube and watch original, actual film of the "biorobot" men running desperately on the roof.  Craig Mazin said on the HBO podcast that he basically transcribed the speech that you can see on the original footage, of the instructions given to the men before they went out on the roof, where the leader recited that speed every couple of minutes, like a prayer.  

    This and the puppies... hardest episode to watch yet, and I can't believe that we're watching a TV series this good right now.  
    CapeGabe
  • JeffreyJeffrey Des Moines
    James said:
    After watching the fates of the firefighters and others last week, they give us the systematic extermination of the abandoned pets. I knew it had to end with puppies.

    I knew what the fate of Ludmilla's baby would be -- I think I read it online -- but why is it that the pets affect me more?
    I think it's because we've seen on film lots of human characters die horrible, gruesome deaths. But the dramatization of pets being killed is still pretty rare. It's also because while our interactions with other humans are a mixed bag -- some people are nice to us, some people are terrible -- most of us have had pets (eps. dogs) that just *adored* us and loved us unconditionally. And that makes seeing them suffer causes us a lot of pain.
    CapeGabe
  • Hatorian said:
    Man. That opening was incredible. 
    I’ve been so traumatized about the stuff with the dogs that I completely forgot how AMAZING that opening was. Excellent scene. 

    I loved the the beginning and end of the episode, some of the best TV I’ve seen this year - everything in between was a bit less impressive than the previous episode but still excellent. Jared Harris is kicking assssssssss.
    rkcrawf
  • The dog part was definitely hard for me. I've had dogs my entire life and my current dog is 8 and was recently diagnosed with Osteosarcoma which is a form of bone cancer. I find it scary or maybe troubling that I have no problem watching something like John Wick where hundreds of people are killed and have almost no emotional reaction but as soon as it's something related to pets it's the hardest thing to watch.

    I think it really does come down to their innocence and the inability to speak and explain things to them. It's not like they were killing the animals for no reason, they had to in order to prevent the risk and spread of the radioactive poisoning. Regardless it's such a hard thing to watch.

    I can't remember what other "great" shows have been on this year but I'll be damned if this hasn't been the best show on TV so far this year. Jared Harris and Stellan Skarsgård have been nothing short of amazing with their performances as has Emily Watson and Jessie Buckley (Lyudmilla, the fireman's wife) even though they haven't had nearly the amount of screentime.
    CapeGabeMarci
  • CapeGabe said:
    As a lifetime owner of dogs when I watched the episode at 3 in the morning all I wanted to do was wake up the dog and hug her.

    I wish the guys they sent onto the roof bothered me more but it was the dogs.

    Bruins fan admits he does not like people.  jk
  • tom_g said:
    CapeGabe said:
    As a lifetime owner of dogs when I watched the episode at 3 in the morning all I wanted to do was wake up the dog and hug her.

    I wish the guys they sent onto the roof bothered me more but it was the dogs.

    Bruins fan admits he does not like people.  jk

    Don't poke the bear! This Bruins fan can take a joke. You get the wrong Bruins fan and him and his friends Joe Fitz, Mike Fitz, Fitzy, Big Fitzy, Little Fitzy, Sully, Sully, Sully and Sully will find you just to "Tawk to ya fer a minut"
  • All the ChickensAll the Chickens Birmingham, AL
    Loved this episode, and hated this episode because of the good boy/girl genocide.

    My only real criticism is how it feels when Skarsgård basically looks at the camera and does a Clarissa Explains It All monologue in layman's terms for the viewers, in the middle of a conversations with the scientists. I don't blame the show at all for doing this, because the vast majority of their viewership is 100% reliant on the show delivering all information to them in this fashion, since most people aren't going on Wikipedia or listening to podcasts. It just feels a bit off, despite how necessary it is.
  • redlancerredlancer Seattle
    edited May 29
    Another outstanding episode. 

    I think BaldMove has raised my TV watching IQ. When they lined up to do the 90 second roof-run, as soon as they ran through the opening onto the roof I thought to myself  "Oh, they're going to do a single shot with no cuts to make it feel like the longest 90 second ever", which they did, and it was still visually brilliant.

    Wasn't sure how I felt about Ulana coming back with her baseline theories about what happened to make the reactor explode and finding out Legasov was aware of or even part author of the redacted pages in the report. He's spent the whole show so far saying he had no idea how this type of reactor could blow up, but seems to have written a paper on exactly how one could theoretically blow up, or at least get to such an out of operating range condition that something bad could happen.

    And how does this show introduce characters out of the blue and make you heavily invested in their story by the end? Last week was the miners this week the animal control group. My guess is we probably never see those characters again in the show, but their 20 minutes of screen time had more character development than some characters in an entire series  :)


    BloodyTacoRenirkcrawf
  • All the ChickensAll the Chickens Birmingham, AL
    redlancer said:

    Wasn't sure how I felt about Ulana coming back with her baseline theories about what happened to make the reactor explode and finding out Legasov was aware of or even part author of the redacted pages in the report. He's spent the whole show so far saying he had no idea how this type of reactor could blow up, but seems to have written a paper on exactly how one could theoretically blow up, or at least get to such an out of operating range condition that something bad could happen.

    That's what I was thinking when he first revealed he knew about that flaw, but if I remember correctly as he went on he  said that even with the flaw in question, it still didn't make sense to him that it could lead to an explosion when going through how this could have happened.

    It was this very specific scenario where these guys royally screwed up beyond all conceivable logic that this flaw came into play, which would never happen even under stress testing procedures. I don't think he knew about the conditions in which the engineers screwed up until after she was telling them in this scene.

    I think that the way they played it is what is confusing, because he seems to instantly recall what she's talking about which makes viewers get the impression that he already had this flaw on his mind, and his dialogue in the scene doesn't really track with that idea. The better way that they could have played this was her handing him the papers, him starting to read through it, then coming to the realization of what this was and remembering that whole issue and how it plays into what these idiots did during their test procedure.

    Basically the light bulb should have slowly started coming on for him rather than instantly when she breaks out the redacted papers.
  • MrXMrX CO
    Here's the "Chernobyl 3828" documentary that has actual footage of the "biological robots" clearing the roof. The show did a remarkable job of duplicating this.


    gguenotbenbox
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    redlancer said:
    And how does this show introduce characters out of the blue and make you heavily invested in their story by the end? Last week was the miners this week the animal control group. My guess is we probably never see those characters again in the show, but their 20 minutes of screen time had more character development than some characters in an entire series  :)



    Yeah, definitely.

    - Outsider (shortcut for audience empathy)
    - Man who gets in outsider's corner despite no benefit to himself (shortcut for audience sympathy)
    - The conflict outsider faces of doing something easy but awful (intrigue)
    - Man who was a mentor threatens to kill outsider if he does the job bad (surprise, suspense)
    - Outsider does the job bad, man doesn't kill him (relief, audience sympathy again)
    - Outsider becomes one with the group via the drinking of the vodka which he initially was stodgy about (resolution, "master of two worlds")

    Honestly the whole thing probably fits nicely into Campbell's hero's journey. Road of Trials, Atonement With the Father, Rescue From Without... But I need to be paid for that level analysis so NOPE.


  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    MrX said:
    Here's the "Chernobyl 3828" documentary that has actual footage of the "biological robots" clearing the roof. The show did a remarkable job of duplicating this.


    The guy recommending exploding bullets in the show looks exactly like the real life guy recommending exploding bullets. Perfectly cast even if he is British. 
    MrX
  • Guys, just think how much the Soviet socialist machine did not appreciate people. As far as the arms race was more important than human life.
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    Just saw an article that said this is now the highest rated TV show of all time
  • Hatorian said:
    Just saw an article that said this is now the highest rated TV show of all time
    linky?
  • on IMDB - gotcha
  • I would also like to add that Stellan Skarsgård performed an all time great tantrum considering he was calling out the KGB and Gorbachev in the Soviet Union over the phone and then ended it with a Blutarsky from Animal House.
    JaimieTtom_g
  • Guys, just think how much the Soviet socialist machine did not appreciate people. As far as the arms race was more important than human life.
    https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2017/12/atomic-tests-during-the-1950s-probably-killed-half-a-million-americans/

    Marcitom_ggguenot
  • redlancerredlancer Seattle
    CapeGabe said:
    I would also like to add that Stellan Skarsgård performed an all time great tantrum considering he was calling out the KGB and Gorbachev in the Soviet Union over the phone and then ended it with a Blutarsky from Animal House.

    lol, agreed. It was on par with the Hilter meme one that's been resubbed 10K times on youtube.

  • JeffreyJeffrey Des Moines
    One thing we've been discussing is nuclear energy and whether we need to use it in order to fight climate change.

    I found this study that put together 100 solutions and looked at their effectiveness and the cost-benefit ratio. 

    https://www.drawdown.org/solutions-summary-by-rank

    Nuclear energy was ranked #20, behind onshore wind turbines (#2), solar farms (#8), rooftop solar (#10), and geothermal (#18).  

    There were also a number of solutions that weren't about electricity generation: refrigerant management (#1), reducing food waste (#3), educating girls (#6), and family planning (#7). (The last two: More educated women have fewer children and fewer people = less environmental damage to the planet.)
    Aeshaw90
  • Natter CastNatter Cast San Francisco, CA
    If anyone thinks truly absurd nuclear stupidity can't happen in the good ol US of A, google the Demon Core. One guy was taking subcritical readings keeping the core separated with a frickin' screwdriver. Which he dropped. And the core went supercritical. And he smacked it away with his hand.

    Semi-fictionalized in Fat Man and Little Boy with John Cusak. 

    Now, granted, that's the 40s not the 80s, but lack of common sense is, well...common.
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