Chernobyl Season Finale, Episode 5: Vichnaya Pamyat

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  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    Well that's not very nice.
  • edited June 5
    gguenot said:
    Globalcop said:
    cdrive said:
    Chernobyl
    Season Finale
    “Vichnaya Pamyat”

    cdrive said:
    Chernobyl
    Season Finale
    “Vichnaya Pamyat”

    I'm glad you invoked Dunning- Kruger. It's what I've been calling your podcast. You guys are the perfect example.
    @cdrive has a podcast?

     And you're on cdrive time morning radio, hot takes on cool shows! You're up caller, what do you think was a bigger disaster - the Chernobyl reactor explosion or season 8 of Game of Thrones? 
    cdrivegguenot
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    And it's now time for our game "Believe it........or Not"  We're giving away 2 tickets to this weekend Pineapple Pizza Fest.

    Caller 1, your 1st question:  

    Anatoly Dylatov in real life had a pet turtle named "Boris", believe it.....or not?


  • Ps. I was joking about the cdrives podcast lol Globalcops comment was unnecessary and confusing and based on what he quoted it looked like he was talking about cdrive lol
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    gguenot said:
    Ps. I was joking about the cdrives podcast lol Globalcops comment was unnecessary and confusing and based on what he quoted it looked like he was talking about cdrive lol
    nah he said "you guys."  I think he was trying to call Jim and A.Ron a bunch of boobs!
    gguenot
  • cdrive said:
    And it's now time for our game "Believe it........or Not"  We're giving away 2 tickets to this weekend Pineapple Pizza Fest.

    Caller 1, your 1st question:  

    Anatoly Dylatov in real life had a pet turtle named "Boris", believe it.....or not?


    Not. We all know soviet pets were only allowed to be named Stalin or Lenin. 
  • I loved it. If HBO wants to continue in this docudrama vein about disasters, one on the Challenger explosion would be good. '86 was a bad year  :(
  • jkrist said:
    I loved it. If HBO wants to continue in this docudrama vein about disasters, one on the Challenger explosion would be good. '86 was a bad year  :(
    They could run this for years on just nuclear accidents and near-accidents lol. 
    jkrist
  • Surprised the words 'climate change' have not come up in this thread yet.
  • edited June 6
    This is touching - Slava Malamud is translating someone's tweet that someone placed flowers at the base of statue honoring the liquidators, and it's the first time he's ever seen it done:
    Google translate version of the original tweet:
    "I didn’t watch Chernobyl, but we have a Kantemirovskaya granite stone with a black tablet - a monument to the liquidators of the accident. It sticks out naked by the road: it was only for this reason that I once read what it is dedicated to Today, for the first time in the time that I live here, flowers lie"

  • tom_g said:
    Surprised the words 'climate change' have not come up in this thread yet.

    There is a thread Beyond Chernobyl about nuclear power's future and clean energy I.started a few days ago
  • MrXMrX CO
    tom_g said:
    Surprised the words 'climate change' have not come up in this thread yet.

    YUP:

    White House blocked intelligence agency’s written testimony saying human-caused climate change could be ‘possibly catastrophic’

  • Would it have changed anyone's attitude if when it's written that the fireman's wife's eventually did have a baby boy if that baby boy was named Vladimir Putin? :)
  • Would it have changed anyone's attitude if when it's written that the fireman's wife's eventually did have a baby boy if that baby boy was named Vladimir Putin? :)
    Yeah, I'd feel sorry for Putin for looking so old despite being born in 1986 (leftover radiation, perhaps?) ;)
  • Reni said:
    Would it have changed anyone's attitude if when it's written that the fireman's wife's eventually did have a baby boy if that baby boy was named Vladimir Putin? :)
    Yeah, I'd feel sorry for Putin for looking so old despite being born in 1986 (leftover radiation, perhaps?) ;)

    I know the math doesn't hold up, but in the hypothetical scenario, it would be kind of funny if it was the case and if people's views of the widow change based off of that information.
  • Teresa from ConcordTeresa from Concord Concord, California
    Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid. 

    I can’t think of a better rally cry for upcoming elections (pick a country. it applies to all of us.) Humankind needs to once again embrace logic and reason and face our mistakes head on. We are smart enough to fix things. We just have to want to. 

    This series was fantastic. And beyond the great writing and acting and production, it got some of us thinking and wanting more details to truly understand what happened both on a technical and human scale. I can’t think of many tv shows that accomplished this. Have there been others?
    awookiee
  • meatballmeatball Sweden, Europe
    Did anyone react to what, I think, Aaron said in the podcast that pressing the AZ5 button caused the accident? Is this true, and what is the source for this? From what I understand the meltdown was inevitable. Had the AZ5 button not been pushed there would still have been a meltdown. Though, perhaps without the explosion that affected large parts of rest of Europe. 
  • I think the AZ5 button, had it not had the flaw, would have ended the meltdown because it dumps all the fuel rods into the core, which shuts down the reaction. The flaw cause the reactor to explode instead. Here's the relevant section from wikipedia.

    "At 1:23:40, as recorded by the SKALA centralized control system, a SCRAM (emergency shutdown) of the reactor was initiated. The SCRAM was started when the EPS-5 button (also known as the AZ-5 button) of the reactor emergency protection system was pressed: this engaged the drive mechanism on all control rods to fully insert them, including the manual control rods that had been withdrawn earlier. The reason why the EPS-5 button was pressed is not known, whether it was done as an emergency measure in response to rising temperatures, or simply as a routine method of shutting down the reactor upon completion of the experiment.

    One view is that the SCRAM may have been ordered as a response to the unexpected rapid power increase, although there is no recorded data showing this. Some have suggested that the button was not manually pressed, that the SCRAM signal was automatically produced by the emergency protection system, but the SKALA registered a manual SCRAM signal. Despite this, the question as to when or even whether the EPS-5 button was pressed has been the subject of debate. There have been assertions that the manual SCRAM was initiated due to the initial rapid power acceleration. Others have suggested that the button was not pressed until the reactor began to self-destruct, while others believe that it happened earlier and under calm conditions.[48]:578[49]

    When the EPS-5 button was pressed, the insertion of control rods into the reactor core began. The control rod insertion mechanism moved the rods at 0.4 metres per second (1.3 ft/s), so that the rods took 18 to 20 seconds to travel the full height of the core, about 7 metres (23 ft). A bigger problem was the design of the RBMK control rods, each of which had a graphite neutron moderator section attached to its end to boost reactor output by displacing water when the control rod section had been fully withdrawn from the reactor. That is, when a control rod was at maximum extraction, a neutron-moderating graphite extension was centered in the core with 1.25 metres (4.1 ft) columns of water above and below it. Consequently, injecting a control rod downward into the reactor in a SCRAM initially displaced (neutron-absorbing) water in the lower portion of the reactor with (neutron-moderating) graphite. Thus, an emergency SCRAM initially increased the reaction rate in the lower part of the core as the graphite extensions of rods moving down in the reactor displaced water coolant. This behaviour was discovered when the initial insertion of control rods in another RBMK reactor at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant in 1983 induced a power spike, but as the subsequent SCRAM of that reactor was successful, the subsequently disseminated information had been deemed of little importance."

    Underwood
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