POSITIVE Star Wars Episode 9 SPOILERS Thread

MurderbearMurderbear Cold Spring, Ky
Per Freddy and the other's that agreed, let's have a thread for those that loved/liked Episode 9. Let the hate flow through the other thread.

I personally loved it. It's certainly not perfect but it fulfilled almost everything I want in a Star Wars movie. It was thrilling, exciting, fun and of course brought back those (albeit they can be cheap some times) nostalgia moments that made me cry because the Skywalker story is coming to and end.
Freddycdrive

Comments

  • I took my son to this movie for his birthday and he absolutely loved it. It was a great moment for me to share something that I grew up watching as a kid with something that he loves as a kid. 

    I’m a sucker for the nostalgic moments and I’m not going to lie that I definitely teared up multiple times. 
    MurderbearFreddyweeniegirl
  • MurderbearMurderbear Cold Spring, Ky
    That's awesome. I took my Dad out to lunch and then to see this for his birthday so I was in a similar situation.
    NaugustineFreddy
  • Anyone catch the John Williams cameo?
    Aww_PHuuCk
  • gguenot said:
    Anyone catch the John Williams cameo?
    Where was it?
  • He was on the planet where they were rebooting 3PO and they showed a scene with an old dude with a eye piece fixing something for like 2 seconds
    snoopferneedarwinfeeshy
  • Ah cool. I was wondering what that was about. 
    gguenot
  • WonderedObjectWonderedObject SAN Francisco, CA
    Saw it a second time, loved it even more
    snoopferneeNaugustine
  • I enjoyed most of it, but am increasingly bummed by the end. I teared up every time Leia was onscreen, and cried through the entire scene with Han and Ben. The inclusion of Leia was more extensive than I expected, and I think they did a great job with what they had to work with.
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited December 2019
    Other than just viscerally enjoying it, it had a lot of little things that made it great. These are just a few that come to mind:

    -Rose is an engineering analyst. She was introduced as an entry level version of this. Only makes sense that she becomes a major player in that role once the Resistance starts defining what their personnel are going to take on.

    -Finn is officially a gunner when in a ship and a ground leader when not. Poe flies, Finn shoots. Great nod to their introduction.

    -Speaking of Poe, I loved that his background was revealed. Dirty, filthy drug dealer turned good guy; who can hate that? 

    -The fact that Kylo Ren turned into more of a loose, swashbuckling type just like his father once he came to terms with being a good guy. Very easy to overlook since there are only two moments in the movie after the Han scene, but if you go back and look, he was always full of bravado in the way he fought and maneuvered.

    -Rey fighting to learn how to be an expert with the traditional lightsaber. I half expected to see her put the Luke and Leih sabers together for the final battle, but I think it served the story better having her make her own. Great work by the writers resisting the urge to show off her new toy.
  • @Freddy I would have bet money that she’d try to pull some Darth Maul saber staff shit. 
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas

  • This movie  wasn't perfect but it was a great end of the trilogy of trilogies that is The Skywalker Saga.  I'll be seeing it again soon to see how it holds up to a 2nd viewing but there were multiple moments where the little kid inside of me was just jumping up and down with joy.  There were multiple moments I got choked up during this movie and the ending definitely caused some leaky eyeholes.  I'm very happy with the way it ended but I'm sad so see so much fan backlash regarding it.  
    Murderbearsnoopfernee
  • edited December 2019
    I am rewatching TLJ, I find a lot of the criticism around "ret-conning" the previous film perplexing. Rey being nobody or Rey being the most important person in the galaxy are two sides of the same coin, and they create an interesting duality.  People focus too much on the behind-the-scenes politics of the film production, which is their privilege, but it can spoil the experience of just enjoying the films. I think it is also unreasonable to expect that a prominent character in one film needs to be prominent in the next film. Sometimes there is nothing else to say with a character, and the focus can shift. Again, maybe there are behind-the-scenes explanations for these choices... as a viewer, I kinda don't care.

    I just finished listening to The Watch podcast's review, and a lot of their criticism centered around incoherent narrative choices, like killing Chewie but bringing him back 6 minutes later. To me, this is quintessential Star Wars story-telling in the Saturday Matinee serial mode. There's always been a fundamental tension in these films, where The Heroes Journey provides structure to a series of whimsical episodes. (Clearly Empire got this balance the best, but it is the format of all the films.)  I like when these movies go off on tangents that don't necessarily fit expectations of where the narrative should go.  It keeps them entertaining and surprising, and the tangents offset the more structured, formulaic aspects of the narrative. People complain about the Ewok stuff in RotJ -- and it was not a perfectly executed sequence -- but I think there was a method to the madness of using them counter-balance the gravity of the final confrontation between Luke, Vader and the Emperor. The 3rd act of Rise of Skywalker probably could have used a little more of something unexpected along those lines...
    snoopfernee
  • MurderbearMurderbear Cold Spring, Ky
    What do you all think Finn wanted to tell Rey? I keep seeing that he didn't get to profess his love to her. I think it was that the force was getting stronger inside of him. When she briefly died, he felt that shit. I don't think it was a romance thing at all.
    JaimieTsnoopferneeCory
  • edited December 2019
    What do you all think Finn wanted to tell Rey? I keep seeing that he didn't get to profess his love to her. I think it was that the force was getting stronger inside of him. When she briefly died, he felt that shit. I don't think it was a romance thing at all.
    I think it was a weird choice not to pay off that thread. I do wish we had gotten more of an arc for Finn in this film.  Maybe his story can continue somewhere else.

    Maybe it really was unrequited love. Sometimes those things are better left unsaid.  Or maybe he knew something about her back-story, but was afraid to tell her. 
    As the great band Hall & Oates wrote: 
    I'm still dealing with a force that's so strong
    The force is stringing us along
    Some things are better left unsaid

    Murderbear
  • adampasz said:
    I am rewatching TLJ, I find a lot of the criticism around "ret-conning" the previous film perplexing. Rey being nobody or Rey being the most important person in the galaxy are two sides of the same coin, and they create an interesting duality.  People focus too much on the behind-the-scenes politics of the film production, which is their privilege, but it can spoil the experience of just enjoying the films. I think it is also unreasonable to expect that a prominent character in one film needs to be prominent in the next film. Sometimes there is nothing else to say with a character, and the focus can shift. Again, maybe there are behind-the-scenes explanations for these choices... as a viewer, I kinda don't care.

    I just finished listening to The Watch podcast's review, and a lot of their criticism centered around incoherent narrative choices, like killing Chewie but bringing him back 6 minutes later. To me, this is quintessential Star Wars story-telling in the Saturday Matinee serial mode. There's always been a fundamental tension in these films, where The Heroes Journey provides structure to a series of whimsical episodes. (Clearly Empire got this balance the best, but it is the format of all the films.)  I like when these movies go off on tangents that don't necessarily fit expectations of where the narrative should go.  It keeps them entertaining and surprising, and the tangents offset the more structured, formulaic aspects of the narrative. People complain about the Ewok stuff in RotJ -- and it was not a perfectly executed sequence -- but I think there was a method to the madness of using them counter-balance the gravity of the final confrontation between Luke, Vader and the Emperor. The 3rd act of Rise of Skywalker probably could have used a little more of something unexpected along those lines...
    The watch's criticism makes absolutely no sense given their appreciation of tlj.  The things they say about chewies fake out death could be said exactly in the same format about Leia's death in tlj, where a poignant moment is reversed by something we had never seen or been informed of before. I think a lot of the critical panning of ROS is reactionary to what happened in TLJ. Critics either not wanting to be caught liking something the public didnt or critics with a grudge because of the backlash against TLJ.

    Not that people cant dislike either. I disliked tlj. But every single bit of criticism the watch guys make of ROS applies just as equally to TLJ. At one point they complain about the boundlessness of rey's power, but tlj's conclusion includes a cross galaxy astral projection of luke.
    adampasz
  • edited December 2019
    I think a lot of the critical panning of ROS is reactionary to what happened in TLJ. Critics either not wanting to be caught liking something the public didnt or critics with a grudge because of the backlash against TLJ.

    Not that people cant dislike either. I disliked tlj. But every single bit of criticism the watch guys make of ROS applies just as equally to TLJ. At one point they complain about the boundlessness of rey's power, but tlj's conclusion includes a cross galaxy astral projection of luke.
    Makes me think of Roger Ebert being pilloried for loving Phantom Menace.  To some degree Star Wars movies are a Rorschach Test. You get what you bring to it. TPM is also, oddly, my 83 year-old Dad's favorite Star Wars for reasons I will never understand. But his love for the movie is legitimate, and I am, in a way, jealous of the connection he has with it.
    chrisk
  • redlancerredlancer Seattle
    edited December 2019
    On a more lore-centric level, I liked the re-contextualization of the Sith 'rule-of-two'

    Never made sense to me why they would want to essentially keep the overall count of true Sith down to two if their goal is to fight the Jedi, who numbered anywhere several to several thousand+.

    The idea that it's not two, but two + the power of every Sith who came before makes things a bit more interesting. It makes the idea that the apprentice kills the master when he becomes more powerful more than just an ego power-play, but part of a larger Sith ideology and philosophy, that the Master wants to be killed so he can transfer his cumulative power to the next in line. It makes them much less the 'evil guy craves power because evil' and gives it much more of a feeling of a very, very long con to defeat the Jedi that was planned out long ago.

    I think it re-frames Luke's scene in the throne room on the DeathStar interestingly as well. The Emperor knew that if he struck him down in hate his journey to the Dark side truly would be complete, in that Palpatine's power would transfer to him. If that didn't happen he knew he still had Vader to fill that role. The part that screwed it up is Vader turning back to the light and killing him.

    How it works with him having a bunch of clones I'm not sure, and whether or not Abrams was thinking that deeply about it I don't know. Either way I think it's an interesting plot thread that would have been fun to explore if they had hinted at it in more than the last 15 minutes of a 9-movie saga.

    joepinetreeMurderbear
  • edited December 2019
    About what Finn needed to tell Rey, JJ is trying to leave that open to the viewer but apparently he himself is leaning with revealing to Rey he's Force sensitive.



    Shame the sequel trilogy dropped the ball a little on Finn. Through Force Awakens I always saw him as important in the conflict between Kylo and Rey. Seemed like he had equal amount of conflict with Kylo considering his defection. 

    Anyway this is the positivity thread so here are my positives:

    - LOVED the Wedge cameo. I have such an irrational adoration for that minor character that a 1 second cameo on the Millennium Falcon was satisfying enough for me. Would've preferred he had a couple more lines and see him blasting a few TIEs but beggars can't be choosy in this case. 

    - Really like that Finn is Force sensitive and makes him feel more important to the future of the brand, particularly in books or comics. 

    - Though I felt they fumbled the Palpatine subplot I still quite love watching Ian Mcdiarmid portray the character. I can just watch that dude slice butter and talk about how hate flows through us all, for hours. 

    - I like Rey being a Palpatine. If they were going to walk back the whole "she's a nobody" thing at the very least they didn't make her related by blood to Luke or Obi-Wan. Plus I think it serves a bit of a neat contrast to Luke where one wants to redeem his father and embraces his name while the other knows she can't redeem her grandfather and rejects his name. 
    Murderbear

  • Shame the sequel trilogy dropped the ball a little on Finn. Through Force Awakens I always saw him as important in the conflict between Kylo and Rey. Seemed like he had equal amount of conflict with Kylo considering his defection. 

    - Really like that Finn is Force sensitive and makes him feel more important to the future of the brand, particularly in books or comics. 

    It seemed like some implication that the other defected Storm troopers were too. The girl he was talking to about it said something along the lines of they all dropped their weapons at once when ordered to fire on civilians and she didn't quite understand or believe what happened. Again, another blink and you'll miss it plot point, but might have been some there, there. 
    adampasz
  • redlancer said:

    Shame the sequel trilogy dropped the ball a little on Finn. Through Force Awakens I always saw him as important in the conflict between Kylo and Rey. Seemed like he had equal amount of conflict with Kylo considering his defection. 

    - Really like that Finn is Force sensitive and makes him feel more important to the future of the brand, particularly in books or comics. 

    It seemed like some implication that the other defected Storm troopers were too. The girl he was talking to about it said something along the lines of they all dropped their weapons at once when ordered to fire on civilians and she didn't quite understand or believe what happened. Again, another blink and you'll miss it plot point, but might have been some there, there. 
    Interesting interpretation, but if that's what they were intending, it was way too subtle. And I don't see why he'd be hesitant to tell Rey about it.
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