Parasite (Spoilers)

Watched this over the weekend. Really enjoyed it but definitely think I missed some of the social commentary. My biggest question though was the loose plot line with the Morse code. We see the kid cracking it but then nothing happens with it. It was like Chekhov’s Morse code. But the payoff actually came with the dad. I wonder if this was just something they scrapped or if there was another point in showing the kid. 

Also we’re there any “good guys” in this? I don’t think so. The rich family were probably the nicest but even then it’s clear they are pretty shit too. 

Comments

  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    I've seen this twice now. I LOVE it. It was one of those "joy of movies" movie theater experiences. Enchanting. 

    Copying what I said in another thread:

    -------

    The ending is great. It's a coda that I think is not real, as per him waking up in a coma and laughing about how unreal the doctor and detective were. Also per him literally writing a scene for his father elsewhere in the movie. I don't think the Morse code conversation happened. Regardless, it's there to analyze.

    The genius part is the question of him wanting to save his father. The movie shows the father being saved, and hugged, then it goes back in time to the point where the son is writing the letter, leaving this event pointedly as a question and possibility. Is it possible for a boy to win vindication for his father's sins? Is it possible to do better than our parents? Well, that all depends on if you believe a person in poverty can achieve the basic thing of affording a fucking house after years of trying. The less we, as a society, allow for this condition, the more we've doomed ourselves to tragic endings.
    RyanReesemanHatorianFlukes
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited January 20
    The "good" characters were also the simplest, or, dumbest ones. Ki-woo (the son) and Yeon-Kyo (the rich mom). The rich daughter didn't have a ton to do, so her too. Honestly, the argument that all these characters are bad people is one I don't even think the movie is making. Which is a breath of fresh air to me! I'm less interested in the morality of the individual than the morality of the social system. The social system, our social system, IS immoral.

    Even if all of these characters were what our society considers moral, what would happen? Two deaths would be prevented. But the main family would be out of work with their home flooded just the same. The rich family would be the same. So is this a victory, the reward of moral citizens, to prevent untimely death? Society should do better.
    RyanReesemanHatorian
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited January 20
    @Hatorian At this point, I think the Morse code was added in after the fact to make the ending stronger. So I'm not examining the Morse code use in the main story too closely... although I'd love to read people's theories about what it might mean thematically.

    However, I do like the idea that the children of the rich are more pure and willing to listen to the plight of the poor. So they have their secret language. And the pure rich eventually become jaded when poor people vent their frustration in impolite ways? There's stuff there with that kid, for sure. His love of American Indians. American Indians were a race destroyed by colonialist parasites.
    RyanReesemanHatorian
  • So is there a definitive parasite?  is it the first or second family? or is it the rich family?

    things that stood out to me. 

    Peaches in Korea are believed to have the power to banish evil, used against the first housekeeper to banish her. 

    the whole basement thing is clearly symbolic of rich vs poor. or the rich hiding the poor problem. 

    the sister gets cut cleaning the broken glass but nothing happens with it. seemed like it was leading to her blood being found.

    the rich dad with his weird fetish proving hes just as weird as anyone else so far. 

    this may not even be the real ending but the mom and son getting off way too easy in my eyes. 

    the flooding and the dad ignoring his neighbors plea for help to save their own stuff and then the shitter exploding while Jessica tries to sit on it. 

    ill have to watch it again as im sure there are alot of things to catch. 
    JaimieTcdrive
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    I think the poor family is the definitive parasite, but I think we're supposed to ponder the nature of parasites and the part "hosts" play in creating them. The movie opens with the neighborhood being fumigated. But what are roaches? Just bugs that have learned to survive, that didn't go extinct when the cities were put down. Yet we despise them. (And the American Indian metaphor shows this play out with humanity in a more literal way than the rich/poor relationship. The Indians are the parasites though... I said it backwards earlier. Colonialists took over and treated them like roaches.)

    The rich despise the poor and yet they're the ones who created the problem.
    Hatorian
  • I saw this in a packed theater a couple weeks ago. Blew me away. I genuinely did not know what to expect from one moment to the next. A couple of times, the movie made me laugh aloud only to make me feel guilty for doing so a minute later (the housekeeper getting slammed in the head when she pops up out of nowhere).

    I have to wait for recency bias to die down before I reassess this film, but even a month later I feel like its a top 10 all time movie for me. Definitely the movie of the year.
    JaimieT
  • The Native American thing has to be very purposely done to show what happens when disenfranchised fight each other instead of join together and fight a common enemy. 
    JaimieT
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    That's a great point.
  • JaimieT said:
    That's a great point.
    I wish I could take credit for it but I’ve been reading a lot about this movie cuz I can’t get it out of my head and a few points that resonated with me were the poor families fighting each other instead of the “real problem”. As well as the rich family is actually the parasite on Korea. 
    JaimieT
  • calebthrowercalebthrower South Carolina
    I watched this last night. What a movie. Like many, I definitely think some of the Korean social commentary went over me but damn, I can see why it is so raved about. Looking forward to the HBO show. 
  • bizmarkiefaderbizmarkiefader San Francisco
    httpsiredditokivrufv24x31jpg
    JaimieTFlukes
  • calebthrowercalebthrower South Carolina
    Also, I can't get the "Jessica, only child, Illinois Chicago " jingle out of my head
  • Also, I can't get the "Jessica, only child, Illinois Chicago " jingle out of my head


    calebthrowerJaimieThisdudeness915Flukes
  • If you enjoyed Parasite I can also recommend some other works by the director: Memories of Murder, Barking Dogs Never Bite http://brns.com/korea/pages1/korea16.html , and The Host.
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited February 11
    I need to see Memories of Murder ASAP.

    Okja, on Netflix, is worth watching if you like really fucking well done characters. I thought the story itself was boring, but dear gaaaaawd the characters. The character writing was a thing of beauty indeed. (Also I didn't think it was about the evils of eating meat at all; more about the difficulty of being moral in our society, but I suppose that's just the different layers.) 
    lengmo
  • JaimieT said:
    I need to see Memories of Murder ASAP.

    It's one of my favorite films (along with Mr and Mrs Iyer, Kekexili: Mountain Patrol, and Chungking Express).
    JaimieT
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