Attn: Jim - Italian Fixer Upper Homes

MichelleMichelle California
edited June 15 in General
If you truly want an Italian home away from home, check this out.  They're fixer uppers and you have to commit to renovating them within something like 3 years but still, might be worth it?

https://www.case1euro.it/

EDIT:  never mind, the more I read into it the more it seems like it's too good to be true and there are a lot of fees involved.  Ah well.

EDIT #2 - changed thread title.
nstinsonKela15

Comments

  • Kela15Kela15 Malta, Europe
    Whaaaaaat? I’ve been told property in Sicily is cheap but this is insanely interesting! Found this (in Italian):

    https://it.businessinsider.com/case-a-1-euro-mussomeli-nulvi-cantiano-dove-e-come-comprarle/?refresh_ce
  • I've been half watching these properties. I wish Italy wasn't as backward politically as the U.S. I would love to live there.
    Michelle
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Jim!!!
    Murderbear
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    I read about these a few years back so I might be wrong but from what I understood you basically have to have ALOT of cash and it seems it would be a place you would retire to. Not much options for work there. I could be wrong though. 
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    Jim come join me in NZ. That’s where I’m looking to purchase property. Apparently I’m not the only one with the idea though and anything close to one of the 3-4 major cities is like 600k to 1mil NZD. 

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/feb/15/why-silicon-valley-billionaires-are-prepping-for-the-apocalypse-in-new-zealand

    You can get a nice 1-2 bedroom place though for like 300 farther out. The government is actively developing new suburbs to make housing more affordable. 
  • JaimieT said:
    Jim!!!



    JIIIIIIIIIMMMMMMM!!!!
    Noel
  • MichelleMichelle California
    edited June 16
    Haha, you guys are hilarious:| 
    Schlupp
  • JimJim
    edited June 14
    @Hatorian NZ seems great from a lifestyle / scenery perspective. Cost of living overall doesn't seem too high but you're right, the houses are expensive. We'd be looking outside the major cities anyway and probably rent for a couple years before buying to save up. Their visa approval times are astonishingly short (2 weeks?!) and it seems like it's not difficult to get approved as a student or worker.

    On the con side: Their strict MJ laws are perplexing though, given the laid back nature of the general culture. I also wish their healthcare was truly socialized. Seems like a weird hybrid system. It's also going to be expensive to get there if we want to take any amount of stuff. We'd have to seriously downsize. My video games would have to go.

    We should chat about it. I'd like to hear more details about your move. DM me!
    Hatorian
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    edited June 14
    Hatorian said:
    Jim come join me in NZ. That’s where I’m looking to purchase property. Apparently I’m not the only one with the idea though and anything close to one of the 3-4 major cities is like 600k to 1mil NZD. 

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/feb/15/why-silicon-valley-billionaires-are-prepping-for-the-apocalypse-in-new-zealand

    You can get a nice 1-2 bedroom place though for like 300 farther out. The government is actively developing new suburbs to make housing more affordable. 

    Please buy enough property for me to park my tiny house?

    I can sing, play the piano, sew, cook, bake, tell good stories... a great addition to any prepping scenario.
    Hatorian
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Isn’t NZ super prone to earthquakes? 
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    Dee said:
    Isn’t NZ super prone to earthquakes? 
    Parts are. I’m looking near Auckland area. Not an “earthquake” risk zone really. 
    DeeNoel
  • edited June 15
    Jim said:
    I've been half watching these properties. I wish Italy wasn't as backward politically as the U.S. I would love to live there.

    I'm Spanish living in Ireland, but I've traveled a lot throughout Italy and while they are a bit backwards politically (as with other parts of southern Europe) I honestly think it doesn't even being to compare with the situation in the U.S. (as a distant observer, although I've visited the states a few times).

    In any case, if you can get the Italian passport you are free to move, live and work in any other parts of the EU, so you could always settle somewhere else and you'd still be close to Italy to enjoy this amazing country as a tourist!
Sign In or Register to comment.