I need some help with ethernet cable to my TV

CoryCory New Scotland
I connected my TV to the internet via ethernet cable, expecting it will improve my streaming experience.  However, it just kills my internet.  My router stops working whenever I do this.  It used to last a few hours, but now I'm lucky to get 5 mins.

Comments

  • I had a Blu-ray player do the same thing to me before. My internet would stop working every time I plugged in the ethernet cable from the Blu-ray player to my modem. Tried different cables and a new modem and got the same result. 
  • CoryCory New Scotland
    I had a Blu-ray player do the same thing to me before. My internet would stop working every time I plugged in the ethernet cable from the Blu-ray player to my modem. Tried different cables and a new modem and got the same result. 
    And never found a solution?
  • edited December 2020
    Try updating your router's firmware, and I assume your TV is a smart TV, so try updating that too. Always a slim chance that it's a known issue with the TV or router that has been fixed. 

    Edit - Also, you can throttle individual devices and/or ports on most routers. Just google your model of router and how to do it. The default password should be on a sticker on the router somewhere, or you can just google the make and model of the router to find the default password. To get to the router management page you need to put the router's address into your browser. Default is 10.0.0.1, but you can also just google "how to find router IP address on windows/mac" in case it's not the default. It should also be able to show you usage for various devices, so you can see if your TV is uploading or downloading massive amounts of data for some reason. 
  • A few questions.

    Is this the ISP provided router?  
    What is the router model number and manufacturer?
    Have you tested that cable on another device?
    Have you tried another cable on your TV?
    Have you tried plugging the cable in to a different port on the router?
    How far away is the router from the TV?  (Ethernet cables have a maximum run length of 100M, though I doubt this is an issue for you.)

    A quick comment:
    Most home routers can be accessed via web browser by plugging the IP address of the router in to your address bar.  The vast majority of routers use either 10.0.0.1 or 192.168.0.1 as their default address.  A much smaller quantity user 10.0.0.254 or 192.168.0.254.  Even fewer use different addresses.  99% of the time the IP of your router is the "gateway" address assigned to your devices.  You can probably find this easily on your phone, PC, and probably even your TV. 
    On windows, open command prompt and type "ipconfig /all"  Inspect the output for default gateway.
    On MAC, System Preferences > Network.  Click the "Advanced" button, then the TCP/IP tab.  It will be listed next to "Router"

  • CoryCory New Scotland
    @JoshTheBlack

    Router is not ISP provided, bought it a few months ago. D-Link DIR750

    I had that cable connected to my Android Box, and it worked.

    I have not tried plugging the cable into a different port on the router.

    The distance between the TV and router is about 10-12 feet (although the cable is like 50 foot long, as that's all I had).

    I don't see anything for default gateway.


  • CoryCory New Scotland
    edited December 2020
    asmallcat said:
    Try updating your router's firmware, and I assume your TV is a smart TV, so try updating that too. Always a slim chance that it's a known issue with the TV or router that has been fixed. 

    Edit - Also, you can throttle individual devices and/or ports on most routers. Just google your model of router and how to do it. The default password should be on a sticker on the router somewhere, or you can just google the make and model of the router to find the default password. To get to the router management page you need to put the router's address into your browser. Default is 10.0.0.1, but you can also just google "how to find router IP address on windows/mac" in case it's not the default. It should also be able to show you usage for various devices, so you can see if your TV is uploading or downloading massive amounts of data for some reason. 
    Both the router and TV should be up to date, but I will try updating the TV (I don't think it gets updated anymore though).

     4 of my 10 devices are "Unknown".

    One is Vendor: Sony Interactive Entertainment Inc. but I have two Sony TV's (a Smart TV, and an Android TV), a PS3, a PS4 and a couple Sony Blu-Ray Players (I like Sony OK, I have 3 other older Sony TVs, and 4 Sony clocks  :| )




    EDIT: the Samsung TV and HUAWEI phone are my tenet's.

    I have no idea what that Hon Hai Precision is, I assume his, perhaps his tablet?
  • I've kind of hit the end of my expertise as a "what does google say" IT guy. There should be a traffic meter option under advance settings in your router, but I dunno if it breaks down by device, nor do I know how to throttle on your particular router. 

    On your image the top 3 are the ones plugged in via ethernet cable, while the rest are wifi. Do you have 2 TV's plugged in via ethernet? 
  • CoryCory New Scotland
    asmallcat said:
    I've kind of hit the end of my expertise as a "what does google say" IT guy. There should be a traffic meter option under advance settings in your router, but I dunno if it breaks down by device, nor do I know how to throttle on your particular router. 

    On your image the top 3 are the ones plugged in via ethernet cable, while the rest are wifi. Do you have 2 TV's plugged in via ethernet? 
    I currently have no TVs plugged in via ethernet cable.

    They must be, from right to left, Android Box, PS4 and Living Room Desktop.

  • Have you tried plugging the cable in to a different port on the router?


    This is for sure worth a try if you haven't already. Unplug a device you know is working from the router and use that port for the TV and see if you get the same effect
  • Cory said:
    I had a Blu-ray player do the same thing to me before. My internet would stop working every time I plugged in the ethernet cable from the Blu-ray player to my modem. Tried different cables and a new modem and got the same result. 
    And never found a solution?
    My solution was: Threw that piece of shit Blu ray player in the trash. 

    Seriously though, I ended up just going wireless and never had the issue again. Tried like a year later and the exact same thing happened. I talked to a buddy at work and he said he ran into the same issue before and we chalked it to some kind of ethernet short on the player side. 
  • CoryCory New Scotland

    Have you tried plugging the cable in to a different port on the router?


    This is for sure worth a try if you haven't already. Unplug a device you know is working from the router and use that port for the TV and see if you get the same effect
    So far, so good.  Switched my TV and PS4.  Sometimes it takes a couple of hours though.
    bizmarkiefader
  • Cory said:
    asmallcat said:
    I've kind of hit the end of my expertise as a "what does google say" IT guy. There should be a traffic meter option under advance settings in your router, but I dunno if it breaks down by device, nor do I know how to throttle on your particular router. 

    On your image the top 3 are the ones plugged in via ethernet cable, while the rest are wifi. Do you have 2 TV's plugged in via ethernet? 
    I currently have no TVs plugged in via ethernet cable.

    They must be, from right to left, Android Box, PS4 and Living Room Desktop.
    Oh, sorry, I thought you still had it plugged in, but of course you wouldn't if it was killing your internet lol. 
    Cory
  • Cory said:
    @JoshTheBlack

    Router is not ISP provided, bought it a few months ago. D-Link DIR750

    I had that cable connected to my Android Box, and it worked.

    I have not tried plugging the cable into a different port on the router.

    The distance between the TV and router is about 10-12 feet (although the cable is like 50 foot long, as that's all I had).

    I don't see anything for default gateway.


    I can't find any product information on DIR750.  Could it be this DIR-819 with AC750?  Or this DIR-806IN with AC750?

    Anyway, if it continues to work in the other port, and running your PS4 doesn't cause similar issues, you could just leave it alone and hope it quits happening.  I would recommend buying an unmanaged "dumb" gigabit ethernet switch like this one.  Plug a cable from your router to the switch, and use the switch ports to connect all your devices.  The basic purpose of a switch is to route traffic via Layer 2 (MAC Addresses, 00-FF-75-1D-93-C3 in the picture above) between devices, and pass traffic it can't route via Layer 2 to the router which works on Layer 3 (IP, the 172.21.36.12 above.)  In reality, almost all of the consumer "home routers" are both a router and a switch. Basically, adding a switch will take some strain off your router when you are accessing stuff on another local device.  More importantly, it will allow you to avoid that port if it is faulty, and give you several more ports to connect stuff with.

    I have never been happy with a D-Link router.  Or an Asus, or Netgear, or any of the consumer grade "home routers."  All of them have had far too many issues and died very quickly.  Some of them I spent $300 on.  (I'm looking at you Netgear Nighthawk.)  Back in 2015, I decided to try some prosumer equipment.  (Higher quality, but also requires some learning.)  I spent around $400 on a Unifi router and 2 wireless APs.  It's been running like a dream ever since.  a few years later I added in a $380 managed switch with PoE so I could power the AP's without being near an outlet, and added several PoE network security cameras.  And a ridiculously large 4U rackmounted server with ~72TB of usable storage.  Started playing around with VM's, then Docker.  Then added a rack mounted UPS.  Now my garage looks like a datacenter.  I guess you could say this is a hobby of mine.  
  • CoryCory New Scotland
    Cory said:
    @JoshTheBlack

    Router is not ISP provided, bought it a few months ago. D-Link DIR750

    I had that cable connected to my Android Box, and it worked.

    I have not tried plugging the cable into a different port on the router.

    The distance between the TV and router is about 10-12 feet (although the cable is like 50 foot long, as that's all I had).

    I don't see anything for default gateway.


    I can't find any product information on DIR750.  Could it be this DIR-819 with AC750?  Or this DIR-806IN with AC750?
    My bad, it's 1750, I forgot the 1.



    Anyway, if it continues to work in the other port, and running your PS4 doesn't cause similar issues, you could just leave it alone and hope it quits happening.  I would recommend buying an unmanaged "dumb" gigabit ethernet switch like this one.  Plug a cable from your router to the switch, and use the switch ports to connect all your devices.  The basic purpose of a switch is to route traffic via Layer 2 (MAC Addresses, 00-FF-75-1D-93-C3 in the picture above) between devices, and pass traffic it can't route via Layer 2 to the router which works on Layer 3 (IP, the 172.21.36.12 above.)  In reality, almost all of the consumer "home routers" are both a router and a switch. Basically, adding a switch will take some strain off your router when you are accessing stuff on another local device.  More importantly, it will allow you to avoid that port if it is faulty, and give you several more ports to connect stuff with.  
    Yeah, that's the plan, see if it keeps working.


    I might look into that ethernet switch, thanks.


    And thanks to everyone's help.  Hopefully this solves the problem.
  • CoryCory New Scotland
    Cory said:

    Have you tried plugging the cable in to a different port on the router?


    This is for sure worth a try if you haven't already. Unplug a device you know is working from the router and use that port for the TV and see if you get the same effect
    So far, so good.  Switched my TV and PS4.  Sometimes it takes a couple of hours though.
    That didn't work. ☹
  • Are you assigning a static IP address to your TV?

    Can you review the logs in your router to see what's going on?

    When you say it kills your router, is your router still accessible through a web browser? When this happens what do the activity lights on the router for each port show (blinking, solid etc.)? 

    What type of service is this? Do you have a cable, dsl, or satellite modem in addition to the router that it connects through? 

    Can you link the manual for your exact model of router? Might be able to give you some more ideas if we can see what options you have.  

    Also, I like Josh's suggestion of putting a switch between your router and the TV. You can find a gigabit 10 port switch for a pretty reasonable amount now a days. Last but not least you might consider if the router supports an open source firmware (not sure what's out there now days but ddwrt and tomato are two that used to be available). However, that's really a last resort unless that's something you want to do. 
  • I looked in to alternate firmware for it.  None of the ones I checked have builds for the DIR1750.  I was going to suggest it as a last resort if there was one available. 

    Do you have another router laying around?  Maybe see if the same thing happens with it. (doubtful)

    Any further suggestions I might have would require some serious technical know how. (Like capturing packets with an analyzer and examining them leading up to the modem seizing up.  Seeing if there is any logging on the router you can examine.)
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