Tell me why you hated the ending of Lost

Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
Hey everyone! I am working on a thing and thought I would ask for some input. If you watched Lost at all, whether you were a diehard or casual viewer, and the ending left you unsatisfied, why? Were there answers you wanted that you didn't get? Characters who were left out, marginalized, forgotten or otherwise not handled correctly? Anything you have to say, even if it's more generally about the series as a whole instead of just the ending, will be helpful. (I am a fan, and I loved the ending, but I'm not trying to pick a fight, just gather some ideas.) Thanks!
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Comments

  • Do we even all agree on what the ending of Lost was?

    It's been a while, but as I recall, everything on the island was real, the flash forwards were some kind of reboot so that they could all find each other again and find peace.

    Does this sound right???
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    Hi Andrew that was my understanding. I actually didn't mind the ending after watching Emerson's interview with some college professors explaining it and that they went spiritual at the end. All these characters were damaged and the island was their chance for redemption.
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    The flash-sideways, which were in season 6 only, took place in the afterlife, were some kind of purgatory where they all waited for each other after they died. (Time works differently after you die, I guess, because even though they all died at different times, they all ended up together at the same time on another version of flight 815.) Some people say they hated the end because "none of it was real and they were all dead the whole time." This is not true and when I hear that I think that the person saying it must not have been watching too closely at all. Everything that happened on the Island was "real." There's no doubt about that.
  • TravisTravis CA
    edited December 2014
    I also didn't hate the ending. It wasn't the best finale ever or anything, but I certainly didn't hate it. As I experienced the build up to the end, and heard the way it was being discussed I really figured that there was no way people were going to be satisfied. I just think that is what happens. People get a notion of what they believe will happen because they become so invested spending that much time with these characters and with this story that to see it all come down to that conclusion (What Andrew and Elisa took from it is what I took as well mostly, it's been quite a while but I remember feeling like the island was a sort of purgatory. It was a real, shared experience for the characters but not necessarily something happening on this plane of existence (sorry if I'm totally off base I haven't seen it since it initially aired and I was a casual viewer who did watch all of the episodes, but not in a real "deep-dive-y" kind of way)) it is left with people wanting it to mean more. It maybe rang too much of the classic "it's all a dream" because it wasn't tangible to this plane of existence and that made it all feel like a cop-out, but what else could they have done that would have been satisfying. Really it all made sense to me, and I feel like trying to go in a more "of this worldly" direction would have created an even bigger mess. I was happy with it, and in trying to solve for it in a more satisfying way, I was even somewhat happy with it.
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    In my opinion Lost is some of the best television I have ever seen and very gratifying and thought provoking. That said it I think it is very difficult to end a good solid story or series without alienating some of your viewers. I didn't like the ending of Fringe. Battle Star Galactica 2 nor the Sopranos but stories need to end. For me it's all about the journey...
    Michelle
  • I didn't love the ending of Fringe either. I appreciate what they were trying to do with the last season and it wasn't BAD or anything, but I did kind of find myself wishing that they hadn't gone in that direction. I would have preferred to end the run with those characters without such a massive gear shift. I know that changing the board was Fringe's thing, but what I really loved about Fringe was the fun/joyful moments mixed in among all of the craziness and they made those moments so sparse at the end. Man, I miss Fringe. That show was awesome.
  • hypergenesbhypergenesb Atlanta
    edited December 2014
    I didn't hate or love the ending. But it's been so long, I'm not entirely sure how I felt. (The Serial podcast has me questioning the validity of my memory.) Most likely, I just wasn't moved by the ending the same way I was moved by the journey. The same is true of BSG for me. But I'll be frank: Spiritual endings usually don't work for me, because I have trouble relating to them.

    p.s. @TravisSmith‌ I miss Fringe too. :wink:
  • Yeah @hypergenesb‌. I need more Walter Bishop in my life.
  • @TravisSmith‌ Don't we all. John Noble was brilliant on that show.
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    edited December 2014
    I miss Fringe big time too. I loved BSG except for the last season and ending. Too happily ever after I guess. But check out Michael Emerson's video interview with Stanford profs, the philosophy of Lost. God I loved Ben Linus.
    Michelle
  • I wanna get in on this discussion but I have tried 3 times now to watch the last season of LOST and never made it all the way through. Is it even worth slogging through the last 20+ hours of LOST?
  • @Jim Jones‌ ‌ Personally I definitely thought it was at the time, but I was intrigued from the start of the season. If you've started it and are unhappy with the direction of it you may be better off skipping it. It seems that everyone who I have talked to who thought the season's direction was a bad decision at the start only seemed to get madder as time went on. That, of course, is a small group of people but it seemed to be pretty consistent. If it was about expectations though and you think that another shot with a fresh perspective may help I think it may be worth at least going in on an episode or two to see how you feel about it.
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    Honestly I liked the last season very alternate universe type...what if things had gone better...etc. I would give it a try.
  • I cant remember any of it, guess its time to rewatch them all. I dont remember being disatisfied
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    edited December 2014
    @Elisa‌ thanks for the link. I was a big fan of Ben Linus and Michael Emerson, look forward to watching that when I am not working. @Jim Jones If it seems like a slog then don't do it, but I think if you give it a fair chance you'll like it. The trick is to take your expectations and put them away, try to meet it where it is rather than where you want it to be. If you get to "Sundown" and you're not hooked you might as well give it up.
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    edited December 2014
    So, way back in, wow, 2004, holy shit, I saw the trailer for the show, sat down and watched the first episode and was hooked like I had never been hooked before. (Like, I once pleaded by parents to drive me two hours to a friend house because they had a VHS recording of an episode I had missed. Which really brings home how long ago this show was!!!) As it went on, family members, friends, drifted away from the show but I stayed till the bitter end. And was a big fan till the bitter end. The ending was gratifying for me on an emotional level (saw it live with a big crowd at the Orpheum theater in LA, it was amazing) and I guess I didn't understand the hate, because I didn't understand the people that still watched for the "plot" or the "mystery." I felt if you still were holding out for some, answer every question, tie up every loose thread ending - you were being a bit naive. The mystery was an exciting and intriguing thing, but by the end, it was not the best written part of the show, and not what I watched for. best part? CHARACTERS, CHARACTERS, CHARACTERS! You would be hard pressed to find an equal for this many characters with this much quality. And I felt the ending was more concerned about wrapping up the characters in a gratifying way, which I think it did. Except for Jin and Sun - WTF. The other best aspect of the show, the music. Goddamn, that music. Usually music is "dusting on the cake" or something in the background, but it was a character in the show, and as important as Jack, or Locke. If you took it away - wouldn't be Lost , period. I am rambling, but I will say this; LOST was not the greatest show - but it was the greatest experience I have ever and probably will ever have watching a show. Because it was not just a show. You weren't some lone viewer enjoying at home alone, you watched as a community, you talked, you podcasted, you theorized, you argued, you reviewed - that is what I will remember, and really cherish about the LOST experience. Not a minute of my time was wasted with this show, because every minute was so, SO much fun. I think that is why, to this day, I have never rewatched it. It was such a fantastic experience, and I can't re-live that, and I don't really want to.
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    Here's to Cass Eliot. Also the literature and books in each episode all had hidden meaning toward the episode a scene or the show in general. Such a great show.
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    Absolutely, I learned so much about philosophy from this show. John "Locke" Desmond "Hume" ;)
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    @aberry89‌ thanks for sharing that; I was 100% the same. Only difference is that I have gone back twice since 2010 and done the whole thing again. It's a combination of remembering it so well and seeing it for the first time, away from all of the commentary that filled the space until the next episode. I recently watched the episode where Locke leaves the Island to persuade the Oceanic 6 to come back. His conversation with Kate in that episode still breaks my heart.
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    @FrakkinToaster Man... you're making me want to watch it again. And maybe enough time has gone by where I should..I know it will not be the same experience, but it may be really interesting to see Lost in what will probably be a whole new perspective, I mean, I am a decade older since it first aired! That alone is going to change how I view things, except Desmond - still know I will have a major crush on him lol :) LOST is a big nostalgia show for me; my sister's and I watched it together and still quote it from time to time. Maybe I should get us all together and watch at least the first couple episodes...yeah, okay, i know what i am doing for xmas. :)
  • JaredJared california
    lol, I'm only now stumbling across this site and I got here based on Walking Dead. However I feel compelled to chime in. Lost could have been great. If the writers actually at least a broad idea of what was going on. In the first season there were TWO entities in the jungle and that was NEVER addressed again. Sloppiness like that was typical and annoying.

    Anyone able to turn their brain off completely and just "enjoy" something like Lost, can just as easily stick to shows like Small Wonder. Lost did a good job of being intriguing. It did a terrible job of being satisfying or ultimately interesting. When it was all said and done, it was just a conglomeration of attempts to be mystic and philosophical and failing miserably. Using names of philosophers and scientists and having vague connections to their characters' roles or actions doesn't make the show any "deeper". If anything, Lost seemed to be an attempt to appeal to the philosophical/theological ignorance of the viewers in much the same way that the hugely successful Matrix movie.

    If I remember correctly, the writers even admitted that they went in different directions completely after the pilot. That is a move to make money...not a move to tell "the" story. I can respect that. They made a boatload of money off of the show due to rating. It was very successful the way that it was done...kudos for that sort of success. I won't say that it was "good" though. It lacked internal and intellectual integrity. It was distilled "cliffhanger". I watched it all and after I was able to have some distance I realized that what drew me to it was more akin to "addiction" than "interest". They should train crack dealers.
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    I did a recent netflix binge - an episode a night and reread certain lost blogs To refresh and Enrich my experience. It was just awesome. I would love a ball move flashback group rewatch. (The x-files mythology episodes would be great too). With lost the social media world erupted and became the world we know and love. :)
  • gypzymomgypzymom Portland, OR
    edited December 2014
    @ Jim. I was fanatical over Lost. The last season stunk so bad! Too many writers just don't know how to close a story! Would've been better to drop the damn mike than the crap they pulled! Only less gratifying last episode than the Sopranos... This one actually ticked me off!
    ... So in my opinion. No. Too much other good stuff out there to burn even 1 hour on!
    Gypzymom
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    gypzymom said:

    @ Jim. I was fanatical over Lost. The last season stunk so bad! Too many writers just don't know how to close a story! Would've been better to drop the damn mike than the crap they pulled! Only less gratifying last episode than the Sopranos... This one actually ticked me off!

    ... So in my opinion. No. Too much other good stuff out there to burn even 1 hour on!

    Gypzymom

    Tell me more...this is exactly what I am asking for
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles
    This is my take of the last season. It was showing their life if they had made better decisions in their life and didn't need the island for redemption. IE if Jack had been a better Dad and had not blamed his Dad for all his problems. If Ben Linus had never gone power hungry...etc. If John Locke hadn't blame all his problems on his disability etc...
  • I've been looking through the comments section for the finale episode of a blog that I follow that used to cover LOST and basically all of the negative feedback (which was a lot less than I remember) came down to it all being a huge cop-out. Thinking back I am remembering it more and more too. It was all about the unanswered questions, and people feeling cheated because they were left with the impression that the writers didn't care about these hanging threads. Here are a couple of quotes:

    "I can’t stop thinking about this ending. It’s almost a huge copout. A smart one, but a copout, nonetheless. It’s basically saying that these things happened to Jack, but the only reason they matter is because of the relationships they formed when he was doing these things, and the events themselves were secondary at best. Weird island stuff? Who cares?! It doesn’t matter, oh because EVERYBODYS BEEN DEAD FOR AGES. the viewers, like Jack, need to just LET GO. Touché, writers, touche."

    "I guess the main problem I have with the ending is that, if this was all about love and redemption, why mess with our head with polar bears in jungle, hint of ancient civilizations, time travel and what sure looked like some fountain of youth… I mean remove all this but still keep the Dharma initiative and the others and you can still have 4-5 seasons of show all about love and redemption. That’s where I feel cheated… And if it’s so much about the characters, I guess there is too much inconsistency, change and irrationality in their behaviors for me to get that attached to them… Comparatively, I was much more attached to the characters in West Wing for example, maybe the only other long running drama show I’ve watched in its entirety…
    Finally, what kind of afterlife is that? Where souls wander around aimlessly before finding their constant and remembering what/who they really are? Where you give a son to Jack and then take it away? And that final conversation between Jack and Christian with the non-denominational stained glass in the background… Yipikaye, the world is beautiful, all the religions are wonderful and we can all go to heaven once we’re ready?
    Why is Faraday not ready? Why does Heloise know all about this and still stays in this “in-between” world? To stay with her son? And why have a shot of the wreck without anybody (any bodies) at the end? This just makes no sense…
    A friend warned me that this was gonna happen a couple of years ago, that they had no idea how to close the holes they had opened left and right, that they were just walking randomly in the direction of that final shot that they had in mind. And I have to
    say that he was right… This seems a little slapped together at the last minute… I was thinking about a way to merge the “timelines”, and Jack’s bruises to me were the signs that they were merging… I just thought they were gonna merge in a different direction."

    Apparently it's been too long since I have seen the show (and thanks to this thread I think I am going to start rewatching it soon), so I am out on some of the context, but I figured I would drop these in here in case it is useful for you.
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    @TravisSmith‌ Thank you so much for these! This is exactly what I am looking for, and as a bonus it seems like this thread has made a few people think about watching it again. I definitely recommend doing so. As I said to Jim, if you put the hype and commentary out of your mind and just watch for what's on the screen you're gonna love it.
  • @FrakkinToaster‌ My pleasure. Are you looking for feedback on the finale specifically or the entirety of the last season?
  • Frakkin TFrakkin T Currently Offline
    Both, and the series in general. I'm doing a video podcast that will basically be a defense of the series, and I want to have some coherent arguments to specifically rebut.
  • Interesting. Please link that up when you're done. I'd like to see it.

    If I get a chance I'll dig through the blog a bit more and see if there is anything to give you.
    Shum
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