History Podcast Suggestions?

I’ve got some mind numbing chores to do and I’m in the mood for some history. 

Anyone have any podcast or youtube channel suggestions? I like hearing about wars or big battles from any time period really.

Comments

  • In B4 everyone on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History  Get in on Blueprint for Armageddon (WWI) quickly before it goes subscriber only.

    Revolutions Podcast of great political revolutions.

    A history of the world in 100 objects from the British Museum.
    NervousRhinoAlkaid13Travis
  • Shout out to Stuff you Missed in History class.  About half hour long episodes, the ladies who host it are entertaining and I listen to it fairly frequently.   
    NervousRhinoAlkaid13
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    In B4 everyone on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History  Get in on Blueprint for Armageddon (WWI) quickly before it goes subscriber only.

    Revolutions Podcast of great political revolutions.

    A history of the world in 100 objects from the British Museum.
    If you've already downloaded an episode of Hardcore History, I assume it just stays in your podcast app once it goes subscriber only, yeah?
  • Alkaid13Alkaid13 Georgia
    edited May 2018
    All of the above plus:

    “Serious” History Podcasts -
    The History of Rome (self explanatory)
    The History of Byzantium (Also self explanatory)
    Malcolm Gladwell’s Revisonist History (a re-evaluation of important events of the past)
    You Must Remember This (Various tales from Hollywood circa 20th century)
    The British History Podcast (still self explanatory)

    Informal History Podcasts -
    Rex Factor (two guys explain the history of every king and queen of England/Scotland and then rate them on various categories)
    Totalus Rankium (same concept but different guys and covering the Roman/Byzantine Emperors as well as US Presidents)
  • Pirate History Podcast: Begins before Christopher Columbus and goes through the buccaneer era and is currently still at the end of the 17th century and moving beyond the privateer era. 

    History on Fire: A history professor covering various things from Crazy Horse to Teddy Roosevelt to gladiators to the conquest of Mexico.

    Our Fake History: Covers history that may actually be at least in part myth, and mythical things that may be rooted in real history.
    Alkaid13NervousRhino
  • JoshuaHeterJoshuaHeter Omaha, NE
    Occasionally, the "Stuff you Should Know" podcast has a pretty good episode that covers a historical event. Also, the "Cults" podcast can be interesting (and they pretty much exclusively cover cults from the past), if you're into that sort of thing.
  • edited May 2018
    Great suggestions all around! Between the chores, gaming and my work commute I’ll probably get a piece of all of them eventually. 

    I was was listening to a stuff you missed in history about how Japanese Americans were treated during the war and then went on a binge of WW2 information from some of the suggested sources. I found the Russian invasion and the attack on Pearl Harbor fascinating. I’m ashamed how little I knew about these beforehand. I never realized what a coordinated attack Pearl Harbor was and how successful the Germans were in the early parts of the Russian invasion. 

    Looking forward to the Pirate stuff next. 
    JoshuaHetermajjam0770
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Hardcore History has a WW2 series about the Russian front called "Ghosts of the Osfront." One of my favorites, though his Mongol series is impossible to beat IMO. 
    NervousRhinoEine FrauTravis
  • JaimieT said:
    Hardcore History has a WW2 series about the Russian front called "Ghosts of the Osfront." One of my favorites, though his Mongol series is impossible to beat IMO. 
    Yes to both! It’s funny how much I hated this stuff in school now I can listen to it or read about it all day. 
    majjam0770Travis
  • I would imagine, but if you ever need to redownload I think you're done without paying for it.  I've downloaded them physically to my computer. 

    In B4 everyone on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History  Get in on Blueprint for Armageddon (WWI) quickly before it goes subscriber only.

    Revolutions Podcast of great political revolutions.

    A history of the world in 100 objects from the British Museum.
    If you've already downloaded an episode of Hardcore History, I assume it just stays in your podcast app once it goes subscriber only, yeah?

  • Revolutions by Mike Duncan!!!

    Right now he's covering the Paris Commune, but the biggest, IMO best one he's done is the French Revolution, which starts at Episode 3.1. Very flowing narrative style, but also sticks to the actual history instead of constantly inserting his own overbearing opinions (which is what really turns me off that Carlin guy).
  • FlashGordonFlashGordon Leeds, UK
    edited May 2018
    Hey would agree with most of the above , Revolutions and Hardcore History are amazing

    @alexander.klassen  Agree I think his French Revolution series was his finest work so far.

    An amazing BBC podcast, that get for 4 academic experts on something intoa studio and cover a topic, it's easy to get into, just pic the subject matters you like .. you'll probably go back for more

    In Our Time
  • An amazing BBC podcast, that get for 4 academic experts on something intoa studio and cover a topic, it's easy to get into, just pic the subject matters you like .. you'll probably go back for more

    In Our Time
    This would be my choice if you like the more academic approach, though unfortunately Melvyn Bragg sometimes has to cut them off for time sake (they're 45 mins typically)
    FlashGordon
  • FlashGordonFlashGordon Leeds, UK
    @OldGriswold I know, every episode ends feeling like everyone has more to say. I like that the podcast gets more time, but it would be great if they could do a few short series of IOT like 10 episodes on the War of the Roses, the Margret of Anjou episode would have made great part 1 to that.

    The benefit of this format at least is has often inspired me to go get deep on a topic that grabbed from the IOT 45 mins.
  • History Chicks are awesome!

    Every week they take a woman in history and take a close look at her life.  Its a great relationship between hosts and they are informative and funny.
    majjam0770JaimieT
  • Queens of England is a great podcast about all the queen consorts of England.
    The host of that podcast is now doing a podcast called The Other Half, which is also very good - he's currently discussing Roman Empresses. 

    Another good one is The Dollap - two comedians discuss an event or person from (usually) US History.  (I always skip the first few minutes while they go over tour dates and such, but once they start, it's great)
    majjam0770
  • AjasAjas Seattle, WA
    From Mike Duncan (who did The History of Rome and The Revolutions podcasts) recently did an audiobook about the precursors to the fall of the Roman Republic (BCE 150 - 80) where in 10 hours, he details the events between the 3rd Punic War and the rise of Sulla to dictatorship.  These are political and military wars in the era immediately preceding Caesar's rise that loosened Rome's strict ideal of being a Republic to being primed for takeover as an Empire.

    Anyway, 10 hours for $15 is pretty good, or else free if you're subscribed to Audible

    This is content he went over while doing the History of Rome podcast years earlier, but in much more detailed and well thought-out form.

    He also has 2 appendices of the History of Rome for sale-- a set of biographies of the original historians who recorded all this in the first place.  And a recounting of each of Rome's ill-fated attempts to subjugate Spain during those late Republic years.
    alexander.klassen
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    Hey would agree with most of the above , Revolutions and Hardcore History are amazing

    @alexander.klassen  Agree I think his French Revolution series was his finest work so far.

    An amazing BBC podcast, that get for 4 academic experts on something intoa studio and cover a topic, it's easy to get into, just pic the subject matters you like .. you'll probably go back for more

    In Our Time
    I thought the Revolutions season about Simon Bolívar was the best. 

    The French revolution season was very good though. I always knew the names, Louis, Marie Antoinette, Robespierre, Saint Just, but I never really knew the actual story or how it fitted together. 
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    Revolutions by Mike Duncan!!!

    Right now he's covering the Paris Commune, but the biggest, IMO best one he's done is the French Revolution, which starts at Episode 3.1. Very flowing narrative style, but also sticks to the actual history instead of constantly inserting his own overbearing opinions (which is what really turns me off that Carlin guy).
    The one thing though, is I've noticed ALOT of time is spent on France, like out of 8 seasons three of them, 4 if you count Haiti, are on different revolutions in France, I'm still waiting for the promised season on the Mexican revolution.
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    I’ve got some mind numbing chores to do and I’m in the mood for some history. 

    Anyone have any podcast or youtube channel suggestions? I like hearing about wars or big battles from any time period really.
    Witness by BBC. Now this isn't a detailed podcast, they're like 10-20 minutes in length but they'll usually either interview people at modern historical events or cover events they previously had covered years before. 
  • FlashGordonFlashGordon Leeds, UK
    edited June 2018
    @emnofseattle I've not actually done his Bolivar series, saving that one for a rainy day.
    I think Mike Duncan is best at giving you that overall narrative, which lets you go deeper where you want, i've read a couple of books since about the 1789-1794 period and then some purely on Napoleon since all sparked by that series.

    Also another recommendation, The Great Courses, are amazing for good history series, they're available on audible and other less legal channels too, just finished the peloponnesian war one... great stuff.
  • It makes sense that Mike has focused on France recently since he’s moving there for a while. I believe the Mexican revolution is after this current one. 
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    Alkaid13 said:
    It makes sense that Mike has focused on France recently since he’s moving there for a while. I believe the Mexican revolution is after this current one. 
    I’m looking forward to it. I really am more interested in Latin America then Europe anyway. 

    I didnt hear he lived in France though, Duncan is a graduate of Western Washington University up here I believe 
  • He’s moving to Paris soon to work on his book about Lafayette. 
  • edited June 2018
    ghm3 said:
    Pirate History Podcast: Begins before Christopher Columbus and goes through the buccaneer era and is currently still at the end of the 17th century and moving beyond the privateer era. 
    I've only started listening but I’m really liking this so far. Thanks for the suggestion.
    ghm3
  • Alkaid13 said:
    He’s moving to Paris soon to work on his book about Lafayette. 
    I'm really looking forward to this, as I have a huge soft spot for Layfayette.

    To quote the great musical Hamilton: 'Everyone give it up for America's favorite fighting Frenchman!'    :)
    /nerdout
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    Alkaid13 said:
    He’s moving to Paris soon to work on his book about Lafayette. 
    I'm really looking forward to this, as I have a huge soft spot for Layfayette.

    To quote the great musical Hamilton: 'Everyone give it up for America's favorite fighting Frenchman!'    :)
    /nerdout
    I still don't know why he stayed in France, after nearly losing his head to Robespierre, getting imprisoned in Austria, and with only the most lukewarm of welcomes back by Napolean, whom Lafayette despised, I don't know why he didn't just permanently emigrate to the United States where he was loved and would've died worshipped as a hero. I don't think he was ever really loved in France until long after his death. 


  • Alkaid13 said:
    He’s moving to Paris soon to work on his book about Lafayette. 
    I'm really looking forward to this, as I have a huge soft spot for Layfayette.

    To quote the great musical Hamilton: 'Everyone give it up for America's favorite fighting Frenchman!'    :)
    /nerdout
    I still don't know why he stayed in France, after nearly losing his head to Robespierre, getting imprisoned in Austria, and with only the most lukewarm of welcomes back by Napolean, whom Lafayette despised, I don't know why he didn't just permanently emigrate to the United States where he was loved and would've died worshipped as a hero. I don't think he was ever really loved in France until long after his death. 


    Mike Duncun speaks a lot about Lafayette in the French Revolution section of his Revolutions podcast.
    I'm a huge history fan, and from that podcast, and other books about the American and French Revolution that I've read, my understanding is that Lafayette loved his country very much (which is why he didn't become an American citizen, and chose to be buried in France), and was so inspired by helping with our Revolution, that he went to France to help with theirs.  Unfortunately, it was an entirely different ball game in France (the French Revolution was, to put it mildly, NUTS), and he wasn't appreciated there at that time.  He was considered too radical for the Royalists, but too moderate for the Revolutionists.  He had to flee France because they would have had him beheaded. 
    He was a hero to Americans, and so would come to America, and 'tour', where they hosted dinners in his honor and such to raise money for him.  Many of these dinners were held at Masonic lodges, and many of the Founding Fathers (especially Washington, who once referred to Lafayette as 'the son he never had') would be there.

    Anyway - I'll stop my ranting now, lol.  But tl;dr - Lafayette was a badass, and a great human, and I'm glad France finally gave him the credit he deserves for everything he did/tried to do for their independence. 
  • emnofseattleemnofseattle Mason County, Washington USA
    edited June 2018
    Alkaid13 said:
    He’s moving to Paris soon to work on his book about Lafayette. 
    I'm really looking forward to this, as I have a huge soft spot for Layfayette.

    To quote the great musical Hamilton: 'Everyone give it up for America's favorite fighting Frenchman!'    :)
    /nerdout
    I still don't know why he stayed in France, after nearly losing his head to Robespierre, getting imprisoned in Austria, and with only the most lukewarm of welcomes back by Napolean, whom Lafayette despised, I don't know why he didn't just permanently emigrate to the United States where he was loved and would've died worshipped as a hero. I don't think he was ever really loved in France until long after his death. 


    Mike Duncun speaks a lot about Lafayette in the French Revolution section of his Revolutions podcast.
    I'm a huge history fan, and from that podcast, and other books about the American and French Revolution that I've read, my understanding is that Lafayette loved his country very much (which is why he didn't become an American citizen, and chose to be buried in France), and was so inspired by helping with our Revolution, that he went to France to help with theirs.  Unfortunately, it was an entirely different ball game in France (the French Revolution was, to put it mildly, NUTS), and he wasn't appreciated there at that time.  He was considered too radical for the Royalists, but too moderate for the Revolutionists.  He had to flee France because they would have had him beheaded. 
    He was a hero to Americans, and so would come to America, and 'tour', where they hosted dinners in his honor and such to raise money for him.  Many of these dinners were held at Masonic lodges, and many of the Founding Fathers (especially Washington, who once referred to Lafayette as 'the son he never had') would be there.

    Anyway - I'll stop my ranting now, lol.  But tl;dr - Lafayette was a badass, and a great human, and I'm glad France finally gave him the credit he deserves for everything he did/tried to do for their independence. 
    Yeah I've listened to the season. I think just about the only person introduced the whole season who I liked was Charlotte Corday.

    I wonder if France would've remained better off just staying under the Ancien Regime. By about episode 10 (and I knew almost nothing about the French revolution going into it) I was contextualizing the King and the Church and the good guys and the Revolutionaries as the villians. 

    I'm familiar with Lafayette in the American revolution, but the only things I know about him in France are from Season three of Revolutions and a brief internet skim, and I was simply thinking out loud, why after watching attempts to turn France into a republic or constitutional monarchy fail like three times in his lifetime, I'm amazed he didn't simply emigrate to the US for the rest of his life. 
  • It seems like the guy just really like his country, even if his country didn’t like him, which happens sometimes, it’s good that he’s gotten his due now though. Also yeah given how poorly each successive French Revolution went it’s a wonder they ever managed to establish a proper democracy at all, but also I guess who knows if modern day France would exist minus the complete shitstorms of the previous attempts at democracy. 
    April_May_June
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