TV Recomendations

A while back on Twitch I remember there were quite a few strong opinions on TV brands.  I'm in the market for a new TV (<1000) for the living room (thinking 55 or 65). 

With Prime Day next week does anyone have any experience with the TCL brand? I was reading a few articles that they are really good TV's for the price point. 
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Comments

  • I have the 55 inch Sony 900 series tv, have been really happy with it, was right around $1000. I'm thinking about getting a TCL to upgrade our basement tv at some point - I have heard good things too. I think Sony is going to have better build quality and slightly better picture but from what I've read it really might not be worth the price difference.


    roxbombers
  • MichelleMichelle California
    What is your opinion of Vizio?  I just got a 39” for my spare tv room & so far so good.
    roxbombers
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    MrX said:
    I have the 55 inch Sony 900 series tv, have been really happy with it, was right around $1000. I'm thinking about getting a TCL to upgrade our basement tv at some point - I have heard good things too. I think Sony is going to have better build quality and slightly better picture but from what I've read it really might not be worth the price difference.


    I have the 55" Sony 900 also and like it quite a bit. We may be the same person @MrX, because I also recently heard good things about the TCL and was thinking about getting it as a cheaper stand-by for the bedroom. 
    roxbombersMrX
  • I'm a fan of Vizio when I can't justify the purchase of another Samsung.
    Michelleroxbombers
  • lengmolengmo RTP, NC
    The Wirecutter is a big fan of TCL: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-tv/

    For your price point, have you considered a projector?  If you aren't watching a lot of 4K content, it's nice to have a screen measured in feet, not inches: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-cheap-projector/

  • For this price point TCL 6 series (FALD I think) or Vizio M/P series would be good. If you can find a Sony 900E/F that would be another good choice. 
    roxbombers
  • lengmo said:
    The Wirecutter is a big fan of TCL: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-tv/

    For your price point, have you considered a projector?  If you aren't watching a lot of 4K content, it's nice to have a screen measured in feet, not inches: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-cheap-projector/

    I hadn't put any thought into a projector. I'll have to read that article and take a look, thanks.
  • lengmolengmo RTP, NC
    I hadn't put any thought into a projector. I'll have to read that article and take a look, thanks.
    I have an earlier Benq short throw projector than the one mentioned in the article and really like it.  DVDs and standard Blu-rays look great to my non-expert eyes; even 3D works well.  Besides 4K, the only gotcha I've found is projectors don't like power fluctuations, so if you get one I would put it on a UPS.
    roxbombers
  • Having just bought a new Samsung TV I would offer some advice about 4k TVs if you are looking at them. Make sure your Internet and cable provider can handle the bandwith. I have Comcast and if some shows that should be broadcast in 4k  have low light scenes it looks like a stream from the 90's, blocky and horrible. I wish I never got a 4k.
    roxbombersJaimieTMurderbear
  • JoshTheBlackJoshTheBlack Atlanta, GA
    Linus Tech tips was really hot on the TCL 4K tv too. The 55” is $650. I bought a 55” Sony 4K a year and a half ago for almost $2000 and it doesn’t have HDR. My recommendation is if you’re gonna go 4K, get one with HDR. Especially if you have a PS4 Pro or an XB1X. 
    roxbombersMurderbear
  • Linus Tech tips was really hot on the TCL 4K tv too. The 55” is $650. I bought a 55” Sony 4K a year and a half ago for almost $2000 and it doesn’t have HDR. My recommendation is if you’re gonna go 4K, get one with HDR. Especially if you have a PS4 Pro or an XB1X. 
    I don't know a ton about the TCL brand but they've been getting amazing reviews from everywhere I've seen.  It all depends what size you want and how much you want to spend.  Personally I will always have a TV and never a projector because of the quality I can get with an TV vs. a projector.  I don't have a room where a projector could be set up to look good because there is too much ambient light and I don't want to put 100% blackout curtains up.  My 2 go to brands are Sony and Samsung for LED TVs and LG for OLED TVs.  Also if you are going 4k I highly recommend getting something that does HDR as well.  Basically 4k is your resolution (how many pixels) and HDR is contrast related (how vibrant colors are/can be) when watching HDR capable content.

    If you are looking budget TVs, like @KingKobra Vizio's M and P series are very good.  Feel free to throw questions out on this if you have specifics.  
    roxbombers
  • CapeGabe said:
    Having just bought a new Samsung TV I would offer some advice about 4k TVs if you are looking at them. Make sure your Internet and cable provider can handle the bandwith. I have Comcast and if some shows that should be broadcast in 4k  have low light scenes it looks like a stream from the 90's, blocky and horrible. I wish I never got a 4k.
    That’s less to do with resolution and more to do with compression. When I pause I can see compression artifacts (banding, macroblocking, etc) but the only time I usually see that when “live” streaming is when streaming a low bitrate (which usually tends to be 1080p or 720p) movie or show. I can watch an ITunes movie (4K/HD) or Vudu (4K/HD) and not see this (they use higher bitrates). I do agree that your ISP speed package needs to be adequate, as issues can occur if you have multiple people streaming st the same time. 

    What i find happens is that many people get a larger TV when going to 4K (UHD). With this increase in size the issues with your sources (some are on purpose, others not) will be magnified to a huge degree. Don’t expect a 4K TV to make everything look 4K it’s a TV not a magic box (this is in general, not specific reply to this post). There are for sure benefits to be had (especially with HDR (HDR10, DolbyVision, HLG) and now any medium to high end TV is 4K so you can’t really escape it unless you get an older TV. 
  • KingKobra said:

    That’s less to do with resolution and more to do with compression. When I pause I can see compression artifacts (banding, macroblocking, etc) but the only time I usually see that when “live” streaming is when streaming a low bitrate (which usually tends to be 1080p or 720p) movie or show. I can watch an ITunes movie (4K/HD) or Vudu (4K/HD) and not see this (they use higher bitrates). I do agree that your ISP speed package needs to be adequate, as issues can occur if you have multiple people streaming st the same time. 

    What i find happens is that many people get a larger TV when going to 4K (UHD). With this increase in size the issues with your sources (some are on purpose, others not) will be magnified to a huge degree. Don’t expect a 4K TV to make everything look 4K it’s a TV not a magic box (this is in general, not specific reply to this post). There are for sure benefits to be had (especially with HDR (HDR10, DolbyVision, HLG) and now any medium to high end TV is 4K so you can’t really escape it unless you get an older TV. 
    When everything is working OK it is amazing, there is no doubt about that, it looks like I'm looking through a window. I seem to have more problems in cable than anything I watch streaming that is built into the TV. The bad seems to happen even on new shows that are supposed to be in 4K on my 4K Xfinity box, with the 4K package and new HDMI cables, like the scene in this season's Westworld with Delos in the dim lit test room. It was really bad. There should be some kind of down scaling built into these TVs that when you aren't getting 4K it doesn't try to show it in 4K but now I am talking about things I have no idea how they work so I will stop.
  • MattyWeavesMattyWeaves Mid-State New York
    This has been a good read. My in laws gave me their TV when they upgraded, about six years ago. The TV itself is 8 years old now. It's LG, 47 inches, 1080, which at the time was a major upgrade over my 27 inch 720. And even that one I got from a friend for helping him move. I've never actually bought a new TV myself.

    The LG has been very good to me, but it's starting to act up with certain things and I think it's time for a new one. TCL keeps coming up as I'm in that 'under $1000' group. I would love to get LG again, or even Sony, but anything decent seems out of my price range right now.

    My biggest thing about getting a TCL is the roku set up. Not that I mind that, but I have a Roku Ultra that I really like, so I feel like it would be overkill to get a roku tv. Maybe I'm wrong, but I haven't seen any amazing deals, so I haven't jumped on anything.

    Should I wait for Sony and/or LG to drop a little, or go with TCL? I watch a decent amount of movies and tv, and I play tons of Xbox. I have a feeling because I have such an "old" tv, any upgrade to 4K is probably going to seem like a big difference to me, but I also want something that's going to last.
  • edited July 2018
    CapeGabe said:
    KingKobra said:

    That’s less to do with resolution and more to do with compression. When I pause I can see compression artifacts (banding, macroblocking, etc) but the only time I usually see that when “live” streaming is when streaming a low bitrate (which usually tends to be 1080p or 720p) movie or show. I can watch an ITunes movie (4K/HD) or Vudu (4K/HD) and not see this (they use higher bitrates). I do agree that your ISP speed package needs to be adequate, as issues can occur if you have multiple people streaming st the same time. 

    What i find happens is that many people get a larger TV when going to 4K (UHD). With this increase in size the issues with your sources (some are on purpose, others not) will be magnified to a huge degree. Don’t expect a 4K TV to make everything look 4K it’s a TV not a magic box (this is in general, not specific reply to this post). There are for sure benefits to be had (especially with HDR (HDR10, DolbyVision, HLG) and now any medium to high end TV is 4K so you can’t really escape it unless you get an older TV. 
    When everything is working OK it is amazing, there is no doubt about that, it looks like I'm looking through a window. I seem to have more problems in cable than anything I watch streaming that is built into the TV. The bad seems to happen even on new shows that are supposed to be in 4K on my 4K Xfinity box, with the 4K package and new HDMI cables, like the scene in this season's Westworld with Delos in the dim lit test room. It was really bad. There should be some kind of down scaling built into these TVs that when you aren't getting 4K it doesn't try to show it in 4K but now I am talking about things I have no idea how they work so I will stop.
    If I'm not mistaken the 4K Xfinity box only has 1 or 2 channels that are actually being broadcast in 4k. Like @KingKobra said it has 100% to do with the cable companies compression and nothing to do with your specific TV being a 4k TV.  He's also correct in the fact that size makes a huge difference.  Tiny imperfections won't be noticed at all on a 40" television but when that is shown on a 65" TV it becomes extremely apparent. 

    https://www.xfinity.com/support/articles/uhd-4k-faqs

    How To Get 4K UHD and 4K UHD/HDR with Xfinity

    4K UHD and 4K UHD/HDR viewing is currently available to Xfinity X1 customers.

    Netflix: 4K UHD and 4K UHD/HDR is available to customers who subscribe to the Netflix Premium plan and have an XG1v4 TV box, with a compatible 4K or 4K/HDR TV and/or AV Receiver and/or Soundbar. Learn more about watching Netflix programs on X1.

    FIFA World Cup 2018: All 64 World Cup matches are available in Telemundo's Spanish language coverage the next day On Demand.



    Basically what this is saying is the only way to actually get 4k content through Xfinity is by watching Netflix (and paying for their higher tier) or watching the Fifa World Cup.  If you are paying extra for Xfinity 4k I highly recommend cancelling because there is almost nothing for content and you can get Netflix 4k through the Netflix App on your television.
    KingKobra
  • CapeGabe said:
    KingKobra said:

    That’s less to do with resolution and more to do with compression. When I pause I can see compression artifacts (banding, macroblocking, etc) but the only time I usually see that when “live” streaming is when streaming a low bitrate (which usually tends to be 1080p or 720p) movie or show. I can watch an ITunes movie (4K/HD) or Vudu (4K/HD) and not see this (they use higher bitrates). I do agree that your ISP speed package needs to be adequate, as issues can occur if you have multiple people streaming st the same time. 

    What i find happens is that many people get a larger TV when going to 4K (UHD). With this increase in size the issues with your sources (some are on purpose, others not) will be magnified to a huge degree. Don’t expect a 4K TV to make everything look 4K it’s a TV not a magic box (this is in general, not specific reply to this post). There are for sure benefits to be had (especially with HDR (HDR10, DolbyVision, HLG) and now any medium to high end TV is 4K so you can’t really escape it unless you get an older TV. 
    When everything is working OK it is amazing, there is no doubt about that, it looks like I'm looking through a window. I seem to have more problems in cable than anything I watch streaming that is built into the TV. The bad seems to happen even on new shows that are supposed to be in 4K on my 4K Xfinity box, with the 4K package and new HDMI cables, like the scene in this season's Westworld with Delos in the dim lit test room. It was really bad. There should be some kind of down scaling built into these TVs that when you aren't getting 4K it doesn't try to show it in 4K but now I am talking about things I have no idea how they work so I will stop.
    HBO doesn’t air anywhere in 4K. The only way to get 4K is via UHDBR (Westworld S1 and GoT S1 are their only releases thus far). What you are seeing as @letrbuck2006 has said is compression from your cable company. This is a common thread in almost every cable company. It’s why many enthusiasts have gone to streaming as you get a higher quality version with less compression in many cases. 

    Just as a heads up, if they doescalex everything you’d get small windows for everything that wasn’t 4K on your 4K TV. The lower the resolution, the smaller the box would be. All TVs upscale to their native resolution otherwise you’d see complaints left and right about people wondering why the image doesn’t “fill their screen”. 
    letrbuck2006

  • This has been a good read. My in laws gave me their TV when they upgraded, about six years ago. The TV itself is 8 years old now. It's LG, 47 inches, 1080, which at the time was a major upgrade over my 27 inch 720. And even that one I got from a friend for helping him move. I've never actually bought a new TV myself.

    The LG has been very good to me, but it's starting to act up with certain things and I think it's time for a new one. TCL keeps coming up as I'm in that 'under $1000' group. I would love to get LG again, or even Sony, but anything decent seems out of my price range right now.

    My biggest thing about getting a TCL is the roku set up. Not that I mind that, but I have a Roku Ultra that I really like, so I feel like it would be overkill to get a roku tv. Maybe I'm wrong, but I haven't seen any amazing deals, so I haven't jumped on anything.

    Should I wait for Sony and/or LG to drop a little, or go with TCL? I watch a decent amount of movies and tv, and I play tons of Xbox. I have a feeling because I have such an "old" tv, any upgrade to 4K is probably going to seem like a big difference to me, but I also want something that's going to last.
    TVs don’t last like they used to. Tech is advancing so quickly that instead of 5-10 years most TVs are “outdated” by the next cycle. What it comes down to is determining what you can live with and without. For me I knew I wasn’t going to take advantage of almost anything dealing with HDMI 2.1 and that HDMI 2.1 was/is 1-2 years from being fully realized. What I wanted was a TV that excelled in current formats (HDR10 and DolbyVision) and that made my choice fairly easy via the LG B7. I was also considering the Sony 900E, but after seeing one it had slightly worse performance with its FALD control than my Vizio P series. For your particular case, I’d suggest keeping an eye out closer to the end of the year (save money for this purchase) and see what comes of the Sony 900F, Vizio M/P/PQ and TCL TVs. Right around BF you should start seeing sales again. CES happens in January, so you’ll have to be prepared of seeing all the news of the latest and greatest just around the corner ;) 
    MattyWeavesroxbombers
  • Thanks for all the information although I sure wish this thread was around 3 months ago. What I have got from this is unless you are cord cutting and streaming everything a 4K TV is a bad idea. I wish I knew that. It is funny that  in an earlier post one of the 4K things Comcast says is they have is the World Cup. It looked like a horrendous blocky mess on my TV so not too sure what they were talking about. It must have only been the Spanish channels that got it.
  • edited July 2018
    I feel you have the wrong idea.  Honestly buying a 4k TV is a good idea.  It future proofs yourself for when 4k streaming and 4k cable is more accessible.  A 4k TV is not going to make a non-4k quality source (all cable channels except the World Cup) look any worse than it would on the same size television.  It will actually attempt to upconvert and will in the end make it a slightly better picture than if you had an HDTV.  When you were watching the World Cup, are you certain that you were watching it on the 4k specific channel? 

    What you should take from this is that a 4k TV will not make a picture look any worse than it would if it were displayed on the same size HDTV.  The quality of picture is 100% dependent on  the source that is feeding the video to the TV.  Whether you go with Xfinity, Direct TV, or DISH they all have pretty bad compression.  I personally have Xfinity on a 65" OLED 4k TV and there are definitely scenes in shows (specifically dark scenes) that look like complete garbage because of the way Xfinity/Comcast sends their signals.  
    KingKobra
  • I feel you have the wrong idea.  Honestly buying a 4k TV is a good idea.  It future proofs yourself for when 4k streaming and 4k cable is more accessible.  A 4k TV is not going to make a non-4k quality source (all cable channels except the World Cup) look any worse than it would on the same size television.  It will actually attempt to upconvert and will in the end make it a slightly better picture than if you had an HDTV.  When you were watching the World Cup, are you certain that you were watching it on the 4k specific channel? 

    What you should take from this is that a 4k TV will not make a picture look any worse than it would if it were displayed on the same size HDTV.  The quality of picture is 100% dependent on  the source that is feeding the video to the TV.  Whether you go with Xfinity, Direct TV, or DISH they all have pretty bad compression.  I personally have Xfinity on a 65" OLED 4k TV and there are definitely scenes in shows (specifically dark scenes) that look like complete garbage because of the way Xfinity/Comcast sends their signals.  
    That has not been my experience. Almost every show is 1,000 times worse that my old TV that died. Sporting events all look like they are streamed off of an old AOL dialup. When something is in 4K it is unreal but everything else is garbage. None of the non 4K stuff comes close to the quality my 10 year old TV that died had.
  • edited July 2018
    What size TV did you have before and what size do you have now? Any specifics regarding your old TV model and your new TV model?  Plasma vs. LED TV technology??  If your old TV was a plasma I could maybe see that making more sense as Plasma TVs had extremely good picture quality and definitely helped hide the issues that broadcast TV has.  

    Edit: Also what picture mode do you have the TV set to? Dynamic, Standard, Movie... That's not going to make a huge difference but Dynamic would probably make the issue more apparent.
    KingKobra
  • CapeGabe said:
    I feel you have the wrong idea.  Honestly buying a 4k TV is a good idea.  It future proofs yourself for when 4k streaming and 4k cable is more accessible.  A 4k TV is not going to make a non-4k quality source (all cable channels except the World Cup) look any worse than it would on the same size television.  It will actually attempt to upconvert and will in the end make it a slightly better picture than if you had an HDTV.  When you were watching the World Cup, are you certain that you were watching it on the 4k specific channel? 

    What you should take from this is that a 4k TV will not make a picture look any worse than it would if it were displayed on the same size HDTV.  The quality of picture is 100% dependent on  the source that is feeding the video to the TV.  Whether you go with Xfinity, Direct TV, or DISH they all have pretty bad compression.  I personally have Xfinity on a 65" OLED 4k TV and there are definitely scenes in shows (specifically dark scenes) that look like complete garbage because of the way Xfinity/Comcast sends their signals.  
    That has not been my experience. Almost every show is 1,000 times worse that my old TV that died. Sporting events all look like they are streamed off of an old AOL dialup. When something is in 4K it is unreal but everything else is garbage. None of the non 4K stuff comes close to the quality my 10 year old TV that died had.
    Are you sure you’re not watching the SD channels? I know there are some boxes that unless specifically set will not auto tune to the HD version. As far as the 4K World Cup, I didn’t see/hear any complaints from those that watched it. Are you sure you were watching the 4K version and not just an SD/regular HD version? It almost seems like a settings/set up issue. 

    As @letrbuck2006 asked what was the size of your old TV and what is the size of your new TV? If there was any increase in size and you’re sitting at the same distance you’ll notice that were “hidden” before. Withthe extreme nature of your image it could also require a roll out from your cable co to make sure that everything is ok as well. 
  • I've only used the HD channels on Comcast since they were 1st offered. The TV is a 49" replacing a 42". It was on the top shelf of a desk and is now wall mounted above the desk father back than it was before. When I use my laptop at the desk and have it on for background noise it is very close above my head so I had a good view of any imperfections in the old unit and they are nothing compared to this one. When things are bad with the new set it is not hyperbole that it looks like and old dialup video. It is that blocky.
  • edited July 2018
    CapeGabe said:
    I've only used the HD channels on Comcast since they were 1st offered. The TV is a 49" replacing a 42". It was on the top shelf of a desk and is now wall mounted above the desk father back than it was before. When I use my laptop at the desk and have it on for background noise it is very close above my head so I had a good view of any imperfections in the old unit and they are nothing compared to this one. When things are bad with the new set it is not hyperbole that it looks like and old dialup video. It is that blocky.
    To me that sounds like either a fault in the cable box itself or in the line running to the house from their main feed.  I would contact Xfinity/Comcast and have them troubleshoot it.  Depending on who you talk with they can check speeds going into the cable box itself and typically that will tell if it is pulling through a strong signal.

    The closer you get the worse a TV is going to look but with that said, I have a 65" TV and I sit about 6 feet from it and I can't say I've ever experienced anything to the extent you are describing.  Even if I go within a couple feet of the TV while watching a HD channel it doesn't look horrible unless it is a very dark scene.  I'd be willing to bet you had a plasma before although both plasma and LCD TVs were made in the 42" size.  My Panasonic 55" VT Plasma that's probably 6+ years old still looks damn amazing but it doesn't have 4k ability or HDR abilities so it hardly gets used nowdays.  Unfortunately plasmas have been discontinued by all manufacturers and are now a thing of the past.  The closest equivalent of a plasma is a OLED which tend to be pricey compared to LED/LCD TVs.
  • The old TV was a Sharp Aquos LCD. I might be off by an inch or two, I know it was a forty-something. The new 4K one is a Samsung OLED.

    When I got the new box Comcast had to come out an re-cable and it was getting good signal strength. I'd hate to call them again because dealing with Comcast is like writing a book and every time you take a break you have to start writing the book again. You can't start off where you left with them. I'm sure they make it as painful as possible so people will flinch when they think of calling for help.

    I found the hidden menu for diagnostics and can check all kinds of Comcast speeds myself if anyone knows of what ranges are good?
    BTW for Comcast people with the newish box: 
    1. Hold down exit button for more than 5 seconds
    2. Press the down arrow twice
    3. Press 2
  • CapeGabe said:
    The old TV was a Sharp Aquos LCD. I might be off by an inch or two, I know it was a forty-something. The new 4K one is a Samsung OLED.

    When I got the new box Comcast had to come out an re-cable and it was getting good signal strength. I'd hate to call them again because dealing with Comcast is like writing a book and every time you take a break you have to start writing the book again. You can't start off where you left with them. I'm sure they make it as painful as possible so people will flinch when they think of calling for help.

    I found the hidden menu for diagnostics and can check all kinds of Comcast speeds myself if anyone knows of what ranges are good?
    BTW for Comcast people with the newish box: 
    1. Hold down exit button for more than 5 seconds
    2. Press the down arrow twice
    3. Press 2
    Honestly I have no clue what speeds are good regarding Comcast in those regards.  I don't blame you for not wanting to contact them because it's always a huge pain in the ass.  I am very curious as to what exactly is happening with your setup as I haven't seen anything like what you describing and it would be more prevalent on a larger screen.  Even when I sit very close to my screen it doesn't look anything near to what you are describing.  The main time I see issues with the compression issues that you get with cable is during dark scenes.

    And this really makes no difference but just a heads up to you, you've got either a Samsung QLED (quantum dot) or LED.  Samsung currently does not have an OLED display.  I would guess 98% of OLED TVs out there are LG and the other 2% are Sony TVs that use LGs panels.  I think Panasonic is now getting into the OLED market but to my knowledge they don't have anything out yet for consumer purchase.
    KingKobra
  • CapeGabe said:
    The old TV was a Sharp Aquos LCD. I might be off by an inch or two, I know it was a forty-something. The new 4K one is a Samsung OLED.

    When I got the new box Comcast had to come out an re-cable and it was getting good signal strength. I'd hate to call them again because dealing with Comcast is like writing a book and every time you take a break you have to start writing the book again. You can't start off where you left with them. I'm sure they make it as painful as possible so people will flinch when they think of calling for help.

    I found the hidden menu for diagnostics and can check all kinds of Comcast speeds myself if anyone knows of what ranges are good?
    BTW for Comcast people with the newish box: 
    1. Hold down exit button for more than 5 seconds
    2. Press the down arrow twice
    3. Press 2
    Honestly I have no clue what speeds are good regarding Comcast in those regards.  I don't blame you for not wanting to contact them because it's always a huge pain in the ass.  I am very curious as to what exactly is happening with your setup as I haven't seen anything like what you describing and it would be more prevalent on a larger screen.  Even when I sit very close to my screen it doesn't look anything near to what you are describing.  The main time I see issues with the compression issues that you get with cable is during dark scenes.

    And this really makes no difference but just a heads up to you, you've got either a Samsung QLED (quantum dot) or LED.  Samsung currently does not have an OLED display.  I would guess 98% of OLED TVs out there are LG and the other 2% are Sony TVs that use LGs panels.  I think Panasonic is now getting into the OLED market but to my knowledge they don't have anything out yet for consumer purchase.
    Sorry, its QLED. Getting my acronyms mixed up 
  • CapeGabe said:
    CapeGabe said:
    The old TV was a Sharp Aquos LCD. I might be off by an inch or two, I know it was a forty-something. The new 4K one is a Samsung OLED.

    When I got the new box Comcast had to come out an re-cable and it was getting good signal strength. I'd hate to call them again because dealing with Comcast is like writing a book and every time you take a break you have to start writing the book again. You can't start off where you left with them. I'm sure they make it as painful as possible so people will flinch when they think of calling for help.

    I found the hidden menu for diagnostics and can check all kinds of Comcast speeds myself if anyone knows of what ranges are good?
    BTW for Comcast people with the newish box: 
    1. Hold down exit button for more than 5 seconds
    2. Press the down arrow twice
    3. Press 2
    Honestly I have no clue what speeds are good regarding Comcast in those regards.  I don't blame you for not wanting to contact them because it's always a huge pain in the ass.  I am very curious as to what exactly is happening with your setup as I haven't seen anything like what you describing and it would be more prevalent on a larger screen.  Even when I sit very close to my screen it doesn't look anything near to what you are describing.  The main time I see issues with the compression issues that you get with cable is during dark scenes.

    And this really makes no difference but just a heads up to you, you've got either a Samsung QLED (quantum dot) or LED.  Samsung currently does not have an OLED display.  I would guess 98% of OLED TVs out there are LG and the other 2% are Sony TVs that use LGs panels.  I think Panasonic is now getting into the OLED market but to my knowledge they don't have anything out yet for consumer purchase.
    Sorry, its QLED. Getting my acronyms mixed up 
    No worries at all.  There are tons of them and they are very similar and unless you are around them on a regular basis it's extremely easy to mix them up.  
  • @CapeGabe what do you have your Comcast box set to for output resolution? I know many boxes now you can set “native”, 1080p, etc...also, are you connecting through any other devices? Have you checked your TV settings? It could be a crappy signal (as we’ve been saying), but I’m surprised about how bad your report is. 
  • KingKobra said:
    @CapeGabe what do you have your Comcast box set to for output resolution? I know many boxes now you can set “native”, 1080p, etc...also, are you connecting through any other devices? Have you checked your TV settings? It could be a crappy signal (as we’ve been saying), but I’m surprised about how bad your report is. 
    The video output on the Xfinity box is set to maximum.

    I have 3 HDMI, one for cable, one for Bluray (hardly ever use anymore) and one for Roku (which I never use anymore because all the apps I used before are built into the TV now) The TV has an Ethernet cable plugged in to it not WiFi. All HDMI cables were purchased recently and are of good quality. Basically now all I watch anymore is either the cable HDMI or the apps on the TV.

    This TV has a box you plug all HDMI into and just one cable gets plugged into the back of the TV.

    I'm not too surprised after seeing people complaining about the same thing in the Samsung forum. Samsung blames the cable of course. One thing that Samsung has that I like is a test 4K image in the menu you can bring up to check TV. I wish they also included a test video you could look at.
    KingKobra
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