107 - An Almost Religious Awe

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Comments

  • I will never understand people who have problems with an amount of ambiguity. If I wanted spoon fed answers I would watch CBS. Also, so many answers in this episode while still intriguing with mystery. Perfect in my view
    sassyfontaineElisagjames80rkcrawfChinaski
  • JFC this was SO FUN. I am loving the extra, over the top weirdness. i did not see the Cal/DM thing coming and it GLORIOUS. i mean there were clues but the reveal was so so so fun. I empathize with the Instant Take talk about being bummed that was spoiled, that super sucks. The obvious exposition by Lori and Trieu was heavy handed but it advanced the plot so we can get to the real meat of the last couple episodes. I'm cautiously optimistic about the next two (my "Lost" emotional baggage runs deep, y'all) and i cant wait to see what comes!
    MichaelVCassidyRyanReesemanElisagjames80
  • edited December 2019
    I'm confused. It seems like you get why people think the show is weird.

    It's much weirder than what you normally get from HBO and much weirder than the comics it was based on. Of course some people will be turned off by that.
    Eh, it’s just me being snarky and petty that people are seemingly finding it challenging to come up with a more interesting adjective than “weird.” 

    There’s so much enriching conversation swirling around this show, and so much of it indelibly personal and moving, that I just sort of reflexively sneer when the contribution to the conversation doesn’t seem to be able to elevate past “weird AF bro.” 

    But I realize that’s mostly on me, and not everyone will or is required to have an interesting take on a thing. And honestly, this might be one of those situations where I just don’t find the conversations that a lot of white people are having about this show to be all that worthwhile, and that’s perfectly fine. Like Socrates always said, “you can’t be what you ain’t is.” 

    I might just have to nope out of listening to the discourse on our end like I did with Black Panther and Get Out, because there are way better conversations being had elsewhere. 
    Elisa
  • JimJim
    edited December 2019

    Eh, it’s just me being snarky and petty that people are seemingly finding it challenging to come up with a more interesting adjective than “weird.” 

    There’s so much enriching conversation swirling around this show, and so much of it indelibly personal and moving, that I just sort of reflexively sneer when the contribution to the conversation doesn’t seem to be able to elevate past “weird AF bro.” 

    But I realize that’s mostly on me, and not everyone will or is required to have an interesting take on a thing. And honestly, this might be one of those situations where I just don’t find the conversations that a lot of white people are having about this show to be all that worthwhile, and that’s perfectly fine. Like Socrates always said, “you can’t be what you ain’t is.” 

    I might just have to nope out of listening to the discourse on our end like I did with Black Panther and Get Out, because there are way better conversations being had elsewhere. 
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    gguenotkingbee67BloodyTacoDeeCapeGabe
  • HunkuleseHunkulese Québec, Canada
    Jim said:

    Eh, it’s just me being snarky and petty that people are seemingly finding it challenging to come up with a more interesting adjective than “weird.” 

    There’s so much enriching conversation swirling around this show, and so much of it indelibly personal and moving, that I just sort of reflexively sneer when the contribution to the conversation doesn’t seem to be able to elevate past “weird AF bro.” 

    But I realize that’s mostly on me, and not everyone will or is required to have an interesting take on a thing. And honestly, this might be one of those situations where I just don’t find the conversations that a lot of white people are having about this show to be all that worthwhile, and that’s perfectly fine. Like Socrates always said, “you can’t be what you ain’t is.” 

    I might just have to nope out of listening to the discourse on our end like I did with Black Panther and Get Out, because there are way better conversations being had elsewhere. 
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    I just got that.  :D
    Chinaski
  • Jim said:
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    Is it? I don’t recall anyone who covered The Leftovers being unwaveringly fixated on giant Gary Buseys, goat man, and aboriginal songlines. 
    ElisaChinaski
  • Jim said:

    Eh, it’s just me being snarky and petty that people are seemingly finding it challenging to come up with a more interesting adjective than “weird.” 

    There’s so much enriching conversation swirling around this show, and so much of it indelibly personal and moving, that I just sort of reflexively sneer when the contribution to the conversation doesn’t seem to be able to elevate past “weird AF bro.” 

    But I realize that’s mostly on me, and not everyone will or is required to have an interesting take on a thing. And honestly, this might be one of those situations where I just don’t find the conversations that a lot of white people are having about this show to be all that worthwhile, and that’s perfectly fine. Like Socrates always said, “you can’t be what you ain’t is.” 

    I might just have to nope out of listening to the discourse on our end like I did with Black Panther and Get Out, because there are way better conversations being had elsewhere. 
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    I guess I don't get why it's distracting at all . The two can exist simultaneously in my view. And they are existing quite well in my opinion 
    fidozElisaTeresa from ConcordsassyfontaineChinaski
  • HunkuleseHunkulese Québec, Canada
    edited December 2019
    Jim said:

    Eh, it’s just me being snarky and petty that people are seemingly finding it challenging to come up with a more interesting adjective than “weird.” 

    There’s so much enriching conversation swirling around this show, and so much of it indelibly personal and moving, that I just sort of reflexively sneer when the contribution to the conversation doesn’t seem to be able to elevate past “weird AF bro.” 

    But I realize that’s mostly on me, and not everyone will or is required to have an interesting take on a thing. And honestly, this might be one of those situations where I just don’t find the conversations that a lot of white people are having about this show to be all that worthwhile, and that’s perfectly fine. Like Socrates always said, “you can’t be what you ain’t is.” 

    I might just have to nope out of listening to the discourse on our end like I did with Black Panther and Get Out, because there are way better conversations being had elsewhere. 
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    I guess I don't get why it's distracting at all . The two can exist simultaneously in my view. And they are existing quite well in my opinion 
    I think the biggest issue is saying you don't get why it's distracting. Can you honestly say that a giant blue dildo, lube man, elephant dialysis, pig juries, lake clones, memory pills, and a whole bunch of other stuff isn't extremely weird and weirder than most shows on TV? And most of it seems to be weird just to be weird.

    My opinion is probably somewhere in the middle, but it's pretty easy to see why someone who liked the weird would love it and just as easy to see someone not into the weirdness be put off and distracted by it.
    BroRad33
  • I just want to chime in and say this episode was kind of 'meh" for me. It had a lot good parts in the beginning with Angela and her backstory, but as the episode went on and the weirdness and exposition increased it began to lose me. By the time the "Dr. Calhattan" reveal came I wasn't as invested as I could have been. Its unfortunate because there is a good show with something to say underneath all that extraneous material.

    I would also caution those that did love this episode to avoid mobbing up on those who didn't feel the same. Its not that bad right now, but it seems like we're being dismissed as though we "just don't get it" or " are too caught up in the weirdness, we should just let it go". We have some legitimate criticisms about how how our enjoyment of the show is being hampered. Please don't treat us as though our opinions aren't valid. We have watched just as many episodes of this show as you have.
    ssvendsensassyfontaine
  • Jim said:
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    Is it? I don’t recall anyone who covered The Leftovers being unwaveringly fixated on giant Gary Buseys, goat man, and aboriginal songlines. 
    Because those things were background color that added to the world where they were developing meaningful characters and stories. This show seems to be pushing the latter to the background.
  • So why did the Prosecutor wink at Ozy at the end of her closing argument?
    manhattnikgjames80
  • Jim said:
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    Is it? I don’t recall anyone who covered The Leftovers being unwaveringly fixated on giant Gary Buseys, goat man, and aboriginal songlines. 
    My recollection of The Leftovers was about 20% as weird as Watchmen. I realized after the podcast last night that this is just too much fantasy for me. The comics / movie Watchmen had a couple of fantasy elements that I was able to overlook because of the deeper themes. This version of Watchmen has reversed that ratio, imo. Still interested to see what they pull out for the final 2 episodes but there's no chance this replaces shows like The Leftovers or Breaking Bad in my top tv list.
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    I’m getting shades of old Lost discussions from this thread - where those who are die hard Lindelof stans feel the need to argue constantly about why those who are not so enamoured “don’t get it”.
    BloodyTacogguenotsassyfontaine
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    Jim said:
    Jim said:
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    Is it? I don’t recall anyone who covered The Leftovers being unwaveringly fixated on giant Gary Buseys, goat man, and aboriginal songlines. 
    My recollection of The Leftovers was about 20% as weird as Watchmen. I realized after the podcast last night that this is just too much fantasy for me. The comics / movie Watchmen had a couple of fantasy elements that I was able to overlook because of the deeper themes. This version of Watchmen has reversed that ratio, imo. Still interested to see what they pull out for the final 2 episodes but there's no chance this replaces shows like The Leftovers or Breaking Bad in my top tv list.
    I really like this show overall (yes, some things annoy me), and I'm really digging the themes and commentary, but I would never hold a nine-episode comic book limited series to the same standards as multi-season shows like The Leftovers or Breaking Bad, and certainly not my personal favorite, The Americans, which is completely opposite in pacing and structure compared to Watchmen. Or Succession, which I think is currently the best drama on TV. Apples and oranges.

    Whatever floats your boat, though. I'm not here to tell people they're watching the show wrong, or they don't get it. But when June asked why Angela chose Sister Night, and Angela replied, "Because she looks like me," that spoke to me, as I'm sure it spoke to a lot of non-white people who don't see themselves represented, especially as superheroes. I'm watching for things like that.
    CretanBullRyanReesemanmanhattnikDoubleA_RonDeeElisagjames80MurderbearMichaelVCassidysassyfontaineand 1 other.
  • I will never understand people who have problems with an amount of ambiguity. If I wanted spoon fed answers I would watch CBS. Also, so many answers in this episode while still intriguing with mystery. Perfect in my view
    I’m glad you are enjoying the show so much. Again, I like it but find it more odd than I was expecting. That’s okay. Not trying to take away anyone’s enjoyment of the show. Just think it is potentially getting out-there enough that it might not generate sufficient support for subsequent seasons to be picked up. And I love show ambiguity. The Leftovers was fantastic and I recommend it all the time. I don’t see myself recommending The Watchmen Season 1 in the same way. Hope the last couple episodes are great and I’ll be watching with excitement.  
  • Jim said:
    This is exactly why I think the weirdness is a problem. Early on it was a hook to get people watching the show, but at this point it's distracting from the more important things the show is trying to get at. If all anyone is talking about are giant blue dildos, lube man, and the elephant in the room, that's the fault of the show, isn't it?
    Is it? I don’t recall anyone who covered The Leftovers being unwaveringly fixated on giant Gary Buseys, goat man, and aboriginal songlines. 
    Because those things were background color that added to the world where they were developing meaningful characters and stories. This show seems to be pushing the latter to the background.
    That is exactly how I view giant blue dildos in this show- background color. I’m really not sure why so much more significance is being selectively placed on things in this show compared to that one, but I’m guessing that’s what happens when you’re not connecting to the characters or the story being told. 

    This is a dance that Damon Lindelof is intimately familiar with, as plenty of people never allowed themselves to get past the randomly bizarre shit in Lost or The Leftovers either, I guess. 
    manhattnikElisa
  • manhattnikmanhattnik the big apple
    Lady ... True? Too obvious? Loved the ancient three button clicker remote for the trap door.
  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    Heads up..... I am not a bot, but I just wanted to share that I did finally find Watchmen Vol 1 at the DC Online Store.  

    https://www.shopdcentertainment.com/products/watchmen-vol-1-music-from-the-hbo-series-lp-180-gram-vinyl?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzvmZyfqX5gIVs_7jBx2KsQyyEAQYAiABEgJrH_D_BwE  

    I don't know if anyone else was having trouble, but there you go.  And I pre-ordered Vol 2 and Vol 3 the normal way on Amazon.  You know these things are gonna catch a nice sum in a few years....  because NIN fans can get cray.  
    Murderbeardarwinfeeshy
  • cdrive said:
    Heads up..... I am not a bot
    That's exactly what a bot would say
    RyanReesemancdriveCapeGabeLordByCretanBullElisaMurderbearsassyfontaineChinaski
  • I'm not sure what this says about me, but I really don't think that this show is that weird.  I totally get that strange and unusual things happen, but all of those things are internally consistent with the world that they've created.  The base starting point of the show is the premise that they're living in a world where a giant squid took out most of New York...is a Joker-esque comic booky livingroom trap door really a bridge too far?

    I think that this might be a situation where if you've bought into the show you're willing to roll with it, but if you've got some sort of disconnect with it you'll end up nit-picking it (which - and I don't mean this in any kind of critical way - is probably you trying to rationalize or make sense of your own disconnect).  I say this because a reoccurring comment is that the weirdness is distracting from the themes of the show.  I think that it would be more accurate to say that if you're not jiving with the world that they've created and you're hyper-focused on the weirdness that ends up dominating the conversations that you're having about the show.  As others have pointed out, other reviews and discussions have been centred more squarely on the themes of the show (if I can plug them, read Tom and Lorenzo's review of this episode...it's brilliant (as usual!)). 
    RyanReesemanElisafidozDummyMichaelVCassidysassyfontainepavlovsbellChinaski
  • I'm not sure what this says about me, but I really don't think that this show is that weird.  I totally get that strange and unusual things happen, but all of those things are internally consistent with the world that they've created.  The base starting point of the show is the premise that they're living in a world where a giant squid took out most of New York...is a Joker-esque comic booky livingroom trap door really a bridge too far?

    I think that this might be a situation where if you've bought into the show you're willing to roll with it, but if you've got some sort of disconnect with it you'll end up nit-picking it (which - and I don't mean this in any kind of critical way - is probably you trying to rationalize or make sense of your own disconnect).  I say this because a reoccurring comment is that the weirdness is distracting from the themes of the show.  I think that it would be more accurate to say that if you're not jiving with the world that they've created and you're hyper-focused on the weirdness that ends up dominating the conversations that you're having about the show.  As others have pointed out, other reviews and discussions have been centred more squarely on the themes of the show (if I can plug them, read Tom and Lorenzo's review of this episode...it's brilliant (as usual!)). 
    A lot of the distracting weirdness, at least for me, is from the Ozy stuff. Every time they show Ozy in his weird space prison fishing out babies or spelling something we can't see on the moon with dead clones or on trial with pigs running around I just feel like I have no idea what I'm supposed to be getting out of this. That pointless feeling seeps into the rest of the show, especially when they do things like the elephant that feels both like it's supposed to be this big reveal and also like there's no way you could figure out what it means until they tell you so you're just wasting time thinking about this stupid elephant on the floor and now I don't really give a shit what's going on with the glowing globe and telephone booth from a few episodes ago that I forgot about because I didn't know what I was supposed to be getting out of that at the time either.

    It's not entirely fair, but yea like you said if you don't feel that attachment to the show the bizarre elements are distractions rather than curiosities. It's a matter of how much patience and effort you're willing to invest. At this point I'm on my phone when they're doing the "ooohh boy I bet you don't know what THIS means do you huh" schtick and trying to enjoy the story for what it is.


    gguenotDeesassyfontaine

  • Whatever floats your boat, though. I'm not here to tell people they're watching the show wrong, or they don't get it. But when June asked why Angela chose Sister Night, and Angela replied, "Because she looks like me," that spoke to me, as I'm sure it spoke to a lot of non-white people who don't see themselves represented, especially as superheroes. I'm watching for things like that.
    Those are my favorite parts too. As I mentioned in the podcast, I really liked the Angela stuff this episode and the LG / Angela episodes prior to this were the series' strongest. More compelling character work like that, Lindelof. Less Benjamin Linus bullshit!
    Deesassyfontainepavlovsbell
  • CretanBullCretanBull Toronto
    edited December 2019
    I'm not sure what this says about me, but I really don't think that this show is that weird.  I totally get that strange and unusual things happen, but all of those things are internally consistent with the world that they've created.  The base starting point of the show is the premise that they're living in a world where a giant squid took out most of New York...is a Joker-esque comic booky livingroom trap door really a bridge too far?

    I think that this might be a situation where if you've bought into the show you're willing to roll with it, but if you've got some sort of disconnect with it you'll end up nit-picking it (which - and I don't mean this in any kind of critical way - is probably you trying to rationalize or make sense of your own disconnect).  I say this because a reoccurring comment is that the weirdness is distracting from the themes of the show.  I think that it would be more accurate to say that if you're not jiving with the world that they've created and you're hyper-focused on the weirdness that ends up dominating the conversations that you're having about the show.  As others have pointed out, other reviews and discussions have been centred more squarely on the themes of the show (if I can plug them, read Tom and Lorenzo's review of this episode...it's brilliant (as usual!)). 
    A lot of the distracting weirdness, at least for me, is from the Ozy stuff. Every time they show Ozy in his weird space prison fishing out babies or spelling something we can't see on the moon with dead clones or on trial with pigs running around I just feel like I have no idea what I'm supposed to be getting out of this. That pointless feeling seeps into the rest of the show, especially when they do things like the elephant that feels both like it's supposed to be this big reveal and also like there's no way you could figure out what it means until they tell you so you're just wasting time thinking about this stupid elephant on the floor and now I don't really give a shit what's going on with the glowing globe and telephone booth from a few episodes ago that I forgot about because I didn't know what I was supposed to be getting out of that at the time either.

    It's not entirely fair, but yea like you said if you don't feel that attachment to the show the bizarre elements are distractions rather than curiosities. It's a matter of how much patience and effort you're willing to invest. At this point I'm on my phone when they're doing the "ooohh boy I bet you don't know what THIS means do you huh" schtick and trying to enjoy the story for what it is.


    The elephant in the room was a metaphor for the entire episode.  It will probably end up having some in-world reason for being there, but the show has been a slowly unraveling mystery and in the episode they essentially reveal everything they literally put an elephant in a room (a metaphor for addressing the obvious but unspoken things).  The elephant wasn't a big reveal, the episode was the big reveal and they put the elephant in the room to represent that.  It might be too cute for some, but I thought it was funny.
    bizmarkiefaderElisaMichaelVCassidysassyfontaine
  • For me personally at least, this seems like a show that is less enjoyable if you're Reddit deep-diving to try to make sense of every clue. And really mean no disrespect to Bald Move - I couldn't imagine having to say something thoughtful and entertaining about any TV show for 2 hours every week!

    But then again I am a lover of LOST (and currently slowly rewatching it), so I might be more tolerant of Lindleof shenanigans than others.
    DoubleA_RonElisarkcrawfMichaelVCassidysassyfontaine
  • Lady Trieu’s father - “He will be (here).” Welcome back, Mr. Veidt.
    Doctor_NickElisasassyfontaine
  • I thought the elephant’s function in the actual story was as a repository for the memories that Trieu is interested in storing and probably eventually manipulating or altering people with. 
    Elisapavlovsbell
  • I'm not sure what this says about me, but I really don't think that this show is that weird.  I totally get that strange and unusual things happen, but all of those things are internally consistent with the world that they've created.  The base starting point of the show is the premise that they're living in a world where a giant squid took out most of New York...is a Joker-esque comic booky livingroom trap door really a bridge too far?

    I think that this might be a situation where if you've bought into the show you're willing to roll with it, but if you've got some sort of disconnect with it you'll end up nit-picking it (which - and I don't mean this in any kind of critical way - is probably you trying to rationalize or make sense of your own disconnect).  I say this because a reoccurring comment is that the weirdness is distracting from the themes of the show.  I think that it would be more accurate to say that if you're not jiving with the world that they've created and you're hyper-focused on the weirdness that ends up dominating the conversations that you're having about the show.  As others have pointed out, other reviews and discussions have been centred more squarely on the themes of the show (if I can plug them, read Tom and Lorenzo's review of this episode...it's brilliant (as usual!)). 
    A lot of the distracting weirdness, at least for me, is from the Ozy stuff. Every time they show Ozy in his weird space prison fishing out babies or spelling something we can't see on the moon with dead clones or on trial with pigs running around I just feel like I have no idea what I'm supposed to be getting out of this. That pointless feeling seeps into the rest of the show, especially when they do things like the elephant that feels both like it's supposed to be this big reveal and also like there's no way you could figure out what it means until they tell you so you're just wasting time thinking about this stupid elephant on the floor and now I don't really give a shit what's going on with the glowing globe and telephone booth from a few episodes ago that I forgot about because I didn't know what I was supposed to be getting out of that at the time either.

    It's not entirely fair, but yea like you said if you don't feel that attachment to the show the bizarre elements are distractions rather than curiosities. It's a matter of how much patience and effort you're willing to invest. At this point I'm on my phone when they're doing the "ooohh boy I bet you don't know what THIS means do you huh" schtick and trying to enjoy the story for what it is.


    The elephant in the room was a metaphor for the entire episode.  It will probably end up having some in-world reason for being there, but the show has been a slowly unraveling mystery and in the episode they essentially reveal everything they literally put an elephant in a room (a metaphor for addressing the obvious but unspoken things).  The elephant wasn't a big reveal, the episode was the big reveal and they put the elephant in the room to represent that.  It might be too cute for some, but I thought it was funny.
    Yea I mean it's fine, and any one example I'm sure there are plenty of explanations for why it works but I'm having a hard time caring enough to engage with the show on that level. You could tell me lube man was a metaphor for the Bolshevik Revolution at this point and I would just believe you. I'm mostly here for Angela and Looking Glass' stories which have both been really entertaining.
    CretanBullDeeBloodyTacogguenot
  • A lot of the distracting weirdness, at least for me, is from the Ozy stuff. Every time they show Ozy in his weird space prison fishing out babies or spelling something we can't see on the moon with dead clones or on trial with pigs running around I just feel like I have no idea what I'm supposed to be getting out of this. That pointless feeling seeps into the rest of the show, especially when they do things like the elephant that feels both like it's supposed to be this big reveal and also like there's no way you could figure out what it means until they tell you so you're just wasting time thinking about this stupid elephant on the floor and now I don't really give a shit what's going on with the glowing globe and telephone booth from a few episodes ago that I forgot about because I didn't know what I was supposed to be getting out of that at the time either. 
    Agreed. It's not so much that I think some of the stuff is "too weird." But when it's used to punt on the story it gets frustrating. That scene felt like it was building to a confrontation with Will, but nope she's hooked up to an elephant. I'm sure that will be some cool weird tech thing that gets explained info-dump dialogue later in the season.

    I've realized that outside of the flashbacks, there are not a lot of genuine interactions between any of the characters. It's mostly interrogations or expository info dumps, and those often feature unreliable/dishonest participants. The stuff that works for me is when we see things like Angela and LG dealing with Judd's death or Angela trying to explain the world to her kids. Laurie grilling Angela at the cemetery is great cause we know what cards they're playing with and it adds tension to the cat and mouse game.

    To me, the trap door was dumb, but whatever it's a comic book show, it's a gag, okay. But a trap door that's a device to transport Laurie from one dialogue with a villain explaining their plan to a different villain explaining their plan is not great.
    bizmarkiefaderBloodyTaco
  • Natter CastNatter Cast San Francisco, CA
    No one could have predicted that the sequel to the giant blue penis movie that restored the fake alien squid invasion from the books would be weird.

    Notes:

    * The trapdoor gag with Laurie works for me because it's fitting for The Comedienne 

    * We see three explicitly racially constructed views of generational memory: white identification with a "heritage" of violent supremacy, an African diaspora of parents and children separated by that heritage and strict generational coherence of Asian immigrants. Each of these generational points of view (which we see in our own world) is warped in this one

    * If the Klan became Dr. Manhattan, why would they remain white supremacists? Dr. Manhattan lost the ability to relate to human emotions and racism is driven by emotion. It's difficult to hold on to racism if you have even normal broadening experiences, let alone if you transcend spacetime.

    * The real Lady Trieu rode an elephant, so you see...it all fits.
    CretanBullElisaRyanReesemangjames80Doctor_NickrkcrawfsassyfontaineFlukes
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