10 Album Challenge thingy

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  • Elliot Smith is a tragic conspiracy theory, just unbelievable ending. A story of a young master musician that died way too early a la Kurt Cobain, involving a gf, a hunting knife and a very painful death/suicide/assisted death. Fucking sucks.
    Travis
  • The Clash - London Calling  What they put out in a short period of time is amazing. Hard to pick one but this has to be it just for Train in Vain being a hidden track not listed on the album.

    Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon What could I possibly say that hasn't been already said?

    The Police - Outlandos D'Amour My Police will always be the raw punk/reggae Police before Sting's ego took over.

    Counting Crows - August and Everything After Possibly the best debut album ever especially since they were only together like 6 months before recording this.

    The Band - The Last Waltz So many great performances by a group that had so many talented members.

    The Lemonheads - It's a Shame About Ray Here because it probably wasn't ejected from my car CD player for about a year.

    Bruce Springsteen - Darkness on the Edge of Town Caught the anger of my youth. I would put this on and just drive nowhere.

    U2 - War Unforgettable Fire is probably their best but War was what made me a fan.

    The Alarm - Electric Folklore Great, although short, live album. Most bands sound good in studio but shit live. This band sounded a million times better live than on their albums. Their producer should be shot.

    Paul Westerberg - 14 Songs Another album that spent a lot of time in my rotation in the 90's.

    I didn't use soundtracks, greatest hits and tried to say away from live. There were many artists that I couldn't narrow down an album or discovered after I stopped buying albums and bought individual songs. Here are some honorable mentions:

    Rush - Everything!
    Singles - So great
    Swingers - George Jones and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy? Yes please
    Roy Orbison - Greatest hits was the only one I owned of his
    When Harry Met Sally - Got me into the old standards
    Big Night - Great soundtrack to great movie
    Louis Prima & Keely Smith - Found via Big Night and his catalog is outstanding. Keely Smith might have the greatest female voice I've ever heard.
    Supertramp - Only knew from greatest hits
    Bobby Darin - He's so underrated. 

    DeecdriveTravisHatorian
  • Elliot Smith is a tragic conspiracy theory, just unbelievable ending. A story of a young master musician that died way too early a la Kurt Cobain, involving a gf, a hunting knife and a very painful death/suicide/assisted death. Fucking sucks.
    You got that right, man. I've only shed tears over two people that I've never met and one of them was Elliott Smith. So goddamn tragic. I still remember driving to work through the Hollywood canyons the day after I heard, listening to Figure 8 and my face just started spilling. I was unaware of the conspiracy until pretty recently (always assumed suicide, just in a very dramatic way, almost kind of fitting of a man so haunted). That's a super fucked up thing to think about. 
    rustywright4
  • 10 albums that shaped my music life...
    Chronological (my favorite record by the act in question is in parenthesis at the end because it's rarely the choice):
    1. The Monkees - s/t - my first record. first band I ever loved (same)
    2. Paul Simon - Graceland - I could insert in many chronological spaces because it's always been relevant. (same)
    3. Alice in Chains - Facelift - introduction to the grunge years. Also, kind of where I started finding my own way musically, even though my sister was the one in played them for me. (Dirt)
    4. The Smiths - Queen is Dead - Welcome to the awkward teenager depression. Morrissey really like speaks to me, man. (Strangeways Here We Come)
    5. Sonic Youth - Goo - So... grunge is cool and all, but this... whoa! (same)
    6. Pixies - Surfer Rosa - So Sonic Youth is pretty crazy, but wait... Holy shit! who are these guys?  I wanna play like these guys! In a way, the Pixies was sort of the beginning of an almost identity type shift. I think Surfer Rosa kind of turned me into an indie rock fan, opened the door for Sebadoh and Pavement and Beck and all the greats that came nearly after. (Trompe Le Monde)
    7. Kids Soundtrack - So there's a dude named Lou Barlow and he's going to talk to you a whole lot in a way that feels more "right" than Morrissey talking to you for quite a long time. Plus, Natural One is a fuckin JAM! Also, now I really like stuff that you could describe as "quirky" and that is going to stick in a big, big way. Everything felt different after the Kids Soundtrack in a real way. (Folk Implosion - Dare to be Surprised, Sebadoh - Harmacy)
    8. Pavement - Slanted and Enchanted - Introduction to my favorite band since I was like 16. (Wowee Zowee)
    9. the Good Will Hunting Soundtrack - There's a dude named Elliott Smith and he talks to you now. (XO)
    10. The Beatles - Abbey Road - So I've always loved the Beatles, but now I'm hearing them as a grown up and the experience has seriously leveled up. I literally cried with excitement when the Carry that Weight callback happened the first time in my 20s. The Medley fuckin broke me. (tied with Revolver)

    It's kind of a bummer that I guess I'm pretty "shaped" for about half a lifetime now, but it also kind of makes sense in a way. I still find a lot of great stuff, but the real impact and way a record can change you hasn't really happened since my early 20s.
    Hatorianrustywright4cdrive
  • fidozfidoz Houston
    Travis said:
    Elliot Smith is a tragic conspiracy theory, just unbelievable ending. A story of a young master musician that died way too early a la Kurt Cobain, involving a gf, a hunting knife and a very painful death/suicide/assisted death. Fucking sucks.
    You got that right, man. I've only shed tears over two people that I've never met and one of them was Elliott Smith. So goddamn tragic. I still remember driving to work through the Hollywood canyons the day after I heard, listening to Figure 8 and my face just started spilling. I was unaware of the conspiracy until pretty recently (always assumed suicide, just in a very dramatic way, almost kind of fitting of a man so haunted). That's a super fucked up thing to think about. 
    If you haven't seen it, the Heaven Adores You doc on him is pretty good. I got to see him on his last tour. Love him. 
    Travis
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    Travis said:

    It's kind of a bummer that I guess I'm pretty "shaped" for about half a lifetime now, but it also kind of makes sense in a way. I still find a lot of great stuff, but the real impact and way a record can change you hasn't really happened since my early 20s.
    Same man. I haven’t had an “influential” album since 2002. There are some songs and artists I dig. Kendrick Lamar, Kanye has a few bangers. Lil Wayne I played daily for a brief stint of my life. But basically the ones that bring back a flood of memories are the older ones. 
    Travis
  • edited May 13
    I never know where to go with this question every time it rolls back around on the internet. Taking the instructions strictly (so without any commentary added), I've always just fallen into the Dee's eye-roll category of posting 10 SUPER COOL ALBUMS YOU MUST HEAR. But if I'm going to go strictly with albums that were deeply influential in some way or another, I can't stop myself from adding some annotation. And it's just too hard to figure out how to  narrow it down to 10. So in more or less chronological order of when they lodged in my brain:

    Styx - The Grand Illusion
    Jimi Hendrix - Are you Experienced?
    Led Zeppelin II
    * man, I wore the fuck out of these albums when I first came across them. Styx when I was like 8, because it was the only album my big sister had, and Hendrix/Zeppelin because they were introduced to me at the exact moment when I was first really starting to listen to music. I can still sing every single part of every single instrument and every little vocal inflection on Come Sail Away, which my wife occasionally has the misfortune of triggering in me. Also, I never, ever want to actually hear a single note of any song on any of those albums ever again in my life. Not that I dislike them, but I've just heard all I ever need to hear of them.

    David Bowie - Ziggy Stardust
    REM - Murmur
    * like Come Sail away, I can reproduce every single note of these albums in my head, but unlike Hendrix and Zeppelin, I never, ever have gotten tired of them even after many hundreds of times of listening to them. Bowie’s death was the only celebrity death that has ever really gotten to me. It just never seemed possible that I would live in a world that he wasn’t living in. 

    Black Flag - Damaged
    * maybe the first punk album I listened to? If so, wow, that was a good one to start with. 

    Spike in Vain - Disease is Relative
    * a friend of mine brought this down with him when he moved back to my hometown from Cleveland. The first punk band I heard that had ambitions beyond just hardcore and thrashing. Much noise, much dissonance, well pulled off oddball time signatures. 

    Grateful Dead - Anthem of the Sun
    * the album that was the gateway to lots and lots and lots of drug use. And the gateway to the rest of The Dead’s output. 

    Old and in the Way
    * ok, ugh. I no longer can take hearing a single note of this again, either, but unlike Hendrix and Zeppelin, that’s because this is bad music, even with Vasser Clements and David Grisman. Turns out Jerry Garcia was a really enjoyable banjo player with a pretty weird and unique style, though. Too bad this wasn’t just him and Grisman and Vassar, and no Peter Rowan. Still, this is as much as anything what led me to listening to more or less nothing but exclusively bluegrass and old-time string band music for about 5 years. 

    Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - Will the Circle be Unbroken 
    * the other album that led me down the long path of string band music, except that this one is really, really good. 

    David Grisman Quintet's first album
    * this is a moment when a few young people are pulling an entirely new kind of music out of the air and it is crystallizing around them as they are playing it, and they are full of pure joy at the magic of spinning something out of nothing. Still breathtaking to listen to their raw creativity and virtuosity. The album that led me to attempt (and ultimately fail) to get really good at banjo, even though no actual banjos were present to harm the making of this album. 

    John Hartford - Mark Twang & Aereo-Plain
    * Hartford is my banjo god. 

    Shiina Ringo - Karuki Zamen Kuri no Hana
    * omg, this album contains multitudes. This one set me off on at least a solid year of almost exclusive listening to every single thing Shiina Ringo ever did, over and over again. Another one where I can reproduce every single note in my brain at will. Easily, hands down my favorite album of the 2000s. 

    Kendrick Lamar - To Pimp a Butterfly
    I was 11 when Rapper’s Delight came out, so I’ve been around and aware of lots and lots of hip hop from the beginning. For whatever reason, it never clicked with me. I mean, I liked it fine enough when it was in the background, but I never seeked it out or really had any desire to actively listen to much of it. This album was the moment when rapping finally clicked with me, and now I'm constantly delighted by new hip-hop that's coming out. 
    Deerustywright4HatorianTravis
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