Protests Across the America

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Comments

  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    @Dee I too would love to post that comparison on Twitter if you don't mind! Striking and terrifying.
    CecilyDee
  • CecilyCecily Cincinnati
    I'm just going to do it and delete later if @Dee asks me to. 
    FlukesDee
  • FlukesFlukes Calgary, Canada
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/floyd-officers-charges-1.5596812

    Protesting fucking works. Keep it up friends!
    MurderbearMichelleMarciElisa
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Cecily said:
    Dee said:
    This is the painting I’m thinking of, for reference. It’s called The Problem We All Live With. 


    Can I post this comparison to Twitter? That's a great catch, and I don't want to do it if you already have.
    I’m not on Twitter, and I’m sure someone else noticed it before I did - knock yourself out!
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    amyja89 said:
    @Dee I too would love to post that comparison on Twitter if you don't mind! Striking and terrifying.
    Do it!
  • edited June 4
    For those attending the protests, how many masks are you noticing? Are peoplw distancing as much as possible? Whenever I see a protest on TV it looks like people are densely packed or is that just how it looks in the larger metropolitan areas? 
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    From my local protests:
    CecilyElisa
  • I can't believe the NYT published that fucking garbage Tom Cotton op ed calling for the military to attack American citizens. Why is the times opinion section so consistently terrible? They just let people lie and be vile for the sake of being able to say the represent all view points. 
    BenbizmarkiefaderElisa
  • BenBen Melbourne - Australia
    Freddy said:
    From my local protests:
    Is that a mounted machine gun!? is that even legal?
    FreddycdriveasmallcatJoshTheBlack
  • OliviaDOliviaD Cincinnati, Ohio
    edited June 4
    It’s been a wild ride here in cincinnati. I had several friends arrested the first night of protests.  They were detained overnight outside with no access to shelter, water, food or restrooms. A lot of police brutality in response to peaceful protests. Journalists being arrested. But the Queen City is standing strong and continuing past curfew. Even venturing outside city limits to the suburbs. 

    Here’s one of my favorite signs so far 
    BenFreddyFlukesTxSandManElisa
  • It's crazy to think about the events that took place on Saturday. Riots all over the country and we launched two people into space.
    I wonder how many people protesting would have been glued to the launch under other circumstances and I wonder how many people working at NASA would rather have been protesting.
    Elisa
  • fidozfidoz Houston
    So the MAGAts are taking it up a notch. I've seen them posting their long list of evidence that George Floyd's murder is a fabricated media hoax propagated by CNN. 
  • rhcooprhcoop Knoxville, Tn
    Ben said:
    Freddy said:
    From my local protests:
    Is that a mounted machine gun!? is that even legal?
    That is a bike rack. 
    JaimieTMurderbearCecilyTxSandManFreddyFlukesBen
  • rhcoop said:
    Ben said:
    Is that a mounted machine gun!? is that even legal?
    That is a bike rack. 
    I think Ben was joking. 

    (Also, as someone whose real name is Ben, this is very confusing). 
  • rhcooprhcoop Knoxville, Tn
    edited June 4
    asmallcat said:
    rhcoop said:
    Ben said:
    Is that a mounted machine gun!? is that even legal?
    That is a bike rack. 
    I think Ben was joking. 

    (Also, as someone whose real name is Ben, this is very confusing). 
    Hopefully he was, but I wanted to note that non military cars aren't rolling around like GI Joe. 

    YOJOECOM  VAMP
    Ben
  • Wish I could find the video now, but it was making the rounds a few years ago of a guy with a winch on the hood of his jeep getting yelled at for having a machine gun by some random passer by, 
  • calebthrowercalebthrower South Carolina
    edited June 4
    It’s wild how in a 20 year period cops have gone from some of the most respected people in the US post 9/11 to some of the most hated. Granted, I was only like 12 when that happened so the perception of police may have been rough then too. 
    Dee
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    rhcoop said:
    Ben said:
    Freddy said:
    From my local protests:
    Is that a mounted machine gun!? is that even legal?
    That is a bike rack. 
    Correct. Oddly enough, the owner of that particular bike rack has a machine gun mounted on his bike.
    asmallcatFlukes
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    It’s wild how in a 20 year period cops have gone from some of the most respected people in the US post 9/11 to some of the most hated. Granted, I was only like 12 when that happened so the perception of police may have been rough then too. 
    It certainly was by black people.
    Dee
  • MurderbearMurderbear Cold Spring, Ky
    Freddy said:
    It’s wild how in a 20 year period cops have gone from some of the most respected people in the US post 9/11 to some of the most hated. Granted, I was only like 12 when that happened so the perception of police may have been rough then too. 
    It certainly was by black people.
    Indeed. And I think within my lifetime, March 3 in 1991 changed a lot of public perception. That was the day Rodney King was maliciously and viciously beaten by the LAPD. And of course their verdict of innocence was the spark thay set off the LA riots. God help us if they find those officers in Minneapolis not guilty.
    Flukes
  • After seeing, Most patriotic ive ever felt. GOD BLESS AMERICA https://twitter.com/velvetart/status/1268343491505111040?s=21
    JaimieTNoelcdrive
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    adobo1148 said:
    After seeing, Most patriotic ive ever felt. GOD BLESS AMERICA https://twitter.com/velvetart/status/1268343491505111040?s=21

    Powerful shit.
  • calebthrowercalebthrower South Carolina
    I've got a question for the forums because I know we have smart people on here and I trust/respect your opinions  despite only having online interactions. My son is almost four, and as we watch news of the protests he of course is curious. He is seeing people being angry and so he naturally asks why. My wife and I have told him that a man was hurt and killed and people are upset about it. As innocently as a four year old does, he asks who and we tell him some police officers did. He thinks (as most of us were taught as children) that police are the good people and that they help. We just explain that the police made a bad decision and now they are in some trouble but not all police are like that. I'm being super intentional in trying to raise him with the understanding that some people are treated differently for things like the color of their skin and that we need to do all we can to stop that. I am trying to balance the line of truth while still being somewhat delicate as not to completely turn my son in to a cynic so early (life does that in due time). Is this the right approach? What conversation would you have/are having with your kids about this? 
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    I've got a question for the forums because I know we have smart people on here and I trust/respect your opinions  despite only having online interactions. My son is almost four, and as we watch news of the protests he of course is curious. He is seeing people being angry and so he naturally asks why. My wife and I have told him that a man was hurt and killed and people are upset about it. As innocently as a four year old does, he asks who and we tell him some police officers did. He thinks (as most of us were taught as children) that police are the good people and that they help. We just explain that the police made a bad decision and now they are in some trouble but not all police are like that. I'm being super intentional in trying to raise him with the understanding that some people are treated differently for things like the color of their skin and that we need to do all we can to stop that. I am trying to balance the line of truth while still being somewhat delicate as not to completely turn my son in to a cynic so early (life does that in due time). Is this the right approach? What conversation would you have/are having with your kids about this? 
    Ultimately raising your kid is really about going with your gut. Outside of the obvious “good parenting” techniques like watching your kid around a pool a lot of parenting is about your own feelings and beliefs. Like when to let them watch R rated movies, when to tell them about sex, etc. 

    Just my personal believe and the BM community can call me out for being a bad parent I let my 7 and 9 year old watch Rick and Morty with me and my 9 year old
    loves the show and actually gets a lot of the deeper meaning. He doesn’t laugh when Rick spews an entire sentence of fucks. He’s been taught what swearing is and he knows he can’t say it and doesn’t repeat anything. Never had any problems with him at school. All the PTCs the Teachers are like your kid is an angel, bla bla, etc. 

    I’m also a collector of historical items and have various WW2 weapons on our bookshelves like bayonets and he knows not to ever touch them or play with them. I do keep them out of reach but it’s not impossible to get to. 

    They have also been watching the news and I’ve been honest with them on what’s happening. I’ve told them there are bar people everywhere and it’s important to always question what your told and question people you do not know. IE stranger danger, people with agendas, etc. I’ve been teaching them that the smartest people take in all types of information from all types of sources but then make their own informed decision. But I think it’s important my kids know they need to understand there are bad people with bad intentions and good people with good intentions and ultimately make their own decisions about these people.

    lastly my kids went to an international school from ages 3-7 before we got our permanent residency that allowed them to go to the local schools here and they went to school with probably 3-5 different races. I can tell you with 100% certainty racism isn’t born. It’s taught. Not once did any of those kids in that school ever say or do anything racist. None of them even understood there were people who thought if you were a different Color you were actually different. They were all treated the same. And now that they are in local school they are one of the few mixed kids in their classes and they are not treated any differently. 

    Not sure if this completely answers your question and it might be a bit more than you wanted. In the end I personally don’t want to hide my kids from anything. I just need to make sure they understand that some of this is adult level stuff and they need to treat it as such. 

  • edited June 5
    I've got a question for the forums because I know we have smart people on here and I trust/respect your opinions  despite only having online interactions. My son is almost four, and as we watch news of the protests he of course is curious. He is seeing people being angry and so he naturally asks why. My wife and I have told him that a man was hurt and killed and people are upset about it. As innocently as a four year old does, he asks who and we tell him some police officers did. He thinks (as most of us were taught as children) that police are the good people and that they help. We just explain that the police made a bad decision and now they are in some trouble but not all police are like that. I'm being super intentional in trying to raise him with the understanding that some people are treated differently for things like the color of their skin and that we need to do all we can to stop that. I am trying to balance the line of truth while still being somewhat delicate as not to completely turn my son in to a cynic so early (life does that in due time). Is this the right approach? What conversation would you have/are having with your kids about this? 
    Our kid is about the same age as yours. We've had very similar conversations with her about what's going on. I think honesty is important, and kids understand more than you think. This is a lesson they need to learn if anything will ever change. Be honest, but try not to scare them. The times write a good article on this if you want some tips: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/03/parenting/kids-books-racism.html

    When my kid saw all the windows on our street being boarded up, she asked me about it. I explained to her that the people who owned the stores were worried that protesters might break the windows. She turned to me and asked, "Do we need to board up our windows?" I told her no that we were safe and didn't need to do it. She stood there and thought about it for a minute and then said, "Yeah, are windows are too high up for anyone to break." We live on the third floor. Kind of brakes your heart that your kid has to think about this stuff, that's why it's so important that we change this once and for all. 
    Hatorian
  • LordByLordBy Utah
    Police are people and people aren’t perfect, and lots of people are upset about some terrible mistakes some police officers made. You should still go to the police if you’re in trouble and you can’t find your parents/teachers/babysitters/etc though. If you choose to tell your kid it’s because some people don’t like people who a have different skin shade than they do, they’ll think that’s crazy and that gives you the opportunity to agree that it is crazy and answer more questions.

    I don’t know.

    I wouldn’t lie to my kids about what is going on, but you can share different levels of truth. Some kids can handle different amounts of truth at different ages and you know your kid. My kids are old now, but I went through some similar dilemmas on 9/11 when my oldest was 6.
  • HatorianHatorian Dagobah
    LordBy said:
    Police are people and people aren’t perfect, and lots of people are upset about some terrible mistakes some police officers made.

    I
    Chris rock made a good point I saw on Facebook. Some jobs just can’t have people making mistakes. Imagine if we allowed Pilots to get away with what we do with police..a pilot crashes into a mountain and American Airlines says “well, there’s always Some bad apples” people would lose it. 
    adobo1148tom_gMarciFreddyweeniegirl
  • Id never heard of The story of Geroge Stinney Jr, the youngest person to ever  be executed. 
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited June 5
    My friend's philosophy is to treat cops like bears. Be as still and quiet around them as possible, with the intent of getting away from them asap without drawing attention. It extends to not calling the cops unless there is no other option. "If you call the cops, your chance of getting murdered by a cop just went up."
    DeeMurderbearNoelChristianKela15Underwood
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