The Sopranos

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  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    jluzania said:
    A.Ron just hit "Long Term Parking"! I.e. the episode that made me practically fist pump when a certain scene goes down in "The Blue Comet".
    Probably my favorite episode of the series. Or most impactful at least. It hit me like a ton of bricks. Despite knowing what to expect from the show, it still suckered me in.

    MrX said:
    jluzania said:
    A.Ron just hit "Long Term Parking"! I.e. the episode that made me practically fist pump when a certain scene goes down in "The Blue Comet".

    Really hope we get to hear him to talk about it (and "The Test Dream") on a podcast!
    I am curious of his thoughts on Test Dream. I love that one too, but it is so divisive. Just the entire atmosphere of that episode--even at the beginning--is dream-like. 

    But one thing is for sure, Jim won't remember any of it. 
    MrX
  • jluzania said:
    A.Ron just hit "Long Term Parking"! I.e. the episode that made me practically fist pump when a certain scene goes down in "The Blue Comet".
    Probably my favorite episode of the series. Or most impactful at least. It hit me like a ton of bricks. Despite knowing what to expect from the show, it still suckered me in.

    MrX said:
    jluzania said:
    A.Ron just hit "Long Term Parking"! I.e. the episode that made me practically fist pump when a certain scene goes down in "The Blue Comet".

    Really hope we get to hear him to talk about it (and "The Test Dream") on a podcast!
    I am curious of his thoughts on Test Dream. I love that one too, but it is so divisive. Just the entire atmosphere of that episode--even at the beginning--is dream-like. 

    But one thing is for sure, Jim won't remember any of it. 

    I suspect that with his fondness for the "International Assassin" episode of the Leftovers (and I think he also liked much of Twin Peaks) he would have dug it.

    And lol at Jim ... he definitely needs to rewatch someday!
  • MrX said:
    jluzania said:
    A.Ron just hit "Long Term Parking"! I.e. the episode that made me practically fist pump when a certain scene goes down in "The Blue Comet".
    Probably my favorite episode of the series. Or most impactful at least. It hit me like a ton of bricks. Despite knowing what to expect from the show, it still suckered me in.

    MrX said:
    jluzania said:
    A.Ron just hit "Long Term Parking"! I.e. the episode that made me practically fist pump when a certain scene goes down in "The Blue Comet".

    Really hope we get to hear him to talk about it (and "The Test Dream") on a podcast!
    I am curious of his thoughts on Test Dream. I love that one too, but it is so divisive. Just the entire atmosphere of that episode--even at the beginning--is dream-like. 

    But one thing is for sure, Jim won't remember any of it. 

    I suspect that with his fondness for the "International Assassin" episode of the Leftovers (and I think he also liked much of Twin Peaks) he would have dug it.

    And lol at Jim ... he definitely needs to rewatch someday!
    Good comparisons!  I guess there is also the entire series run of 'Newhart'.
    MrX
  • Chase talked at length about his career, The Sopranos, and The Many Saints of Newark.

    The Sopranos David Chase On Tony’s Ending & The Many Saints of Newark – The Hollywood Reporter
  • jluzania said:
    Chase talked at length about his career, The Sopranos, and The Many Saints of Newark.

    The Sopranos David Chase On Tony’s Ending & The Many Saints of Newark – The Hollywood Reporter

    I was amazed but not really surprised at the number of other outlets that wrongly referenced this story as Chase "clearly settling" the question of whether Tony was killed at the end of the finale.  Chase talks about his original thoughts of how Tony might die, but still doesn't commit to what the cut to black meant.

    I'm comfortable with the ending being ambiguous while also not against the idea the cut to black was Tony being killed. I just don't get the insistence that his death is the only reasonable interpretation.  I read all the tension and anxiety of the ending as just getting us, the audience, into the mental space of Tony having to consider threats around every corner even when he thinks he's safe.  Death is always a heartbeat away, but he also just has to go about his life.  We entered his life with an abrupt cut from black while he was waiting in Dr. Melfie's office and we leave his life equally abruptly with a cut to black. 
  • Garthgou81Garthgou81 Placerville, CA
    mharmless said:
    jluzania said:
    Chase talked at length about his career, The Sopranos, and The Many Saints of Newark.

    The Sopranos David Chase On Tony’s Ending & The Many Saints of Newark – The Hollywood Reporter

    I was amazed but not really surprised at the number of other outlets that wrongly referenced this story as Chase "clearly settling" the question of whether Tony was killed at the end of the finale.  Chase talks about his original thoughts of how Tony might die, but still doesn't commit to what the cut to black meant.

    I'm comfortable with the ending being ambiguous while also not against the idea the cut to black was Tony being killed. I just don't get the insistence that his death is the only reasonable interpretation.  I read all the tension and anxiety of the ending as just getting us, the audience, into the mental space of Tony having to consider threats around every corner even when he thinks he's safe.  Death is always a heartbeat away, but he also just has to go about his life.  We entered his life with an abrupt cut from black while he was waiting in Dr. Melfie's office and we leave his life equally abruptly with a cut to black. 
    I think when this first aired my interpretation was that there was no definitive answer and we could choose his ending however we saw fit. It is the only way Chase could end the series that someone hadn't predicted. I also remember thinking that the unbearable tension the viewer was feeling in those final minutes would be hell to experience as an on-going baseline. In my mind that is what the rest of Tony's life had in store. Constant anxiety, concern, worry for his family's safety, its a hell of his own making. But life goes on as usual.

     In many ways that is what the show was. As many changes happened, Tony and the Soprano family just kept plugging along. Constantly promising themselves to improve, but never actually making lasting changes. In retrospect Chase's finger was definitely on the scale with the reference of everything going black by Bobby in Sopranos Home Movies. But I still really like the idea that Tony just went on with his life, unable to ever fully relax or get over his anxiety/depression that we saw him being treated for in the pilot. There is something Twilight Zone'y about it.
  • mharmless said:
    jluzania said:
    Chase talked at length about his career, The Sopranos, and The Many Saints of Newark.

    The Sopranos David Chase On Tony’s Ending & The Many Saints of Newark – The Hollywood Reporter

    I was amazed but not really surprised at the number of other outlets that wrongly referenced this story as Chase "clearly settling" the question of whether Tony was killed at the end of the finale.  Chase talks about his original thoughts of how Tony might die, but still doesn't commit to what the cut to black meant.

    I'm comfortable with the ending being ambiguous while also not against the idea the cut to black was Tony being killed. I just don't get the insistence that his death is the only reasonable interpretation.  I read all the tension and anxiety of the ending as just getting us, the audience, into the mental space of Tony having to consider threats around every corner even when he thinks he's safe.  Death is always a heartbeat away, but he also just has to go about his life.  We entered his life with an abrupt cut from black while he was waiting in Dr. Melfie's office and we leave his life equally abruptly with a cut to black. 
    I think when this first aired my interpretation was that there was no definitive answer and we could choose his ending however we saw fit. It is the only way Chase could end the series that someone hadn't predicted. I also remember thinking that the unbearable tension the viewer was feeling in those final minutes would be hell to experience as an on-going baseline. In my mind that is what the rest of Tony's life had in store. Constant anxiety, concern, worry for his family's safety, its a hell of his own making. But life goes on as usual.

     In many ways that is what the show was. As many changes happened, Tony and the Soprano family just kept plugging along. Constantly promising themselves to improve, but never actually making lasting changes. In retrospect Chase's finger was definitely on the scale with the reference of everything going black by Bobby in Sopranos Home Movies. But I still really like the idea that Tony just went on with his life, unable to ever fully relax or get over his anxiety/depression that we saw him being treated for in the pilot. There is something Twilight Zone'y about it.

    I get the relationship between the conversation with Bobby and the end, and its certainly a reason to find the interpretation of Tony being killed at the end as plausible, I just have never found those references on their own as persuasive that its the only or heavily favored interpretation of the end, especially since Chase has never answered definitively and the evidence people point to about Tony being killed at the end is circumstantial at best (members only jacket guy, etc.).  Tony reflecting on that conversation only shows that Bobby's description of what it might be like is on his mind, its something he thinks about. 

    I'm due for a rewatch of the last season, so maybe my view might change some since its been so long since I've watched it all in context.  And I'm not saying Tony being killed is a wrong interpretation, I just never found it an open & shut case like so many people seem to want it to be. 
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