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  • Currently reading The Hike by Drew Magary (of Deadspin fame). It's hard to describe - I guess it's technically fantasy ... kind of like what would happen it Steven King had written The Odyssey and combined with with a computer RPG from the 1990s.

    Anyway I recommend it, very engaging and a quick read.
  • WarpFoxWarpFox Nashville, TN
    In the last year or so I've read the first three Song of Ice & Fire books, Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, and the book Console Wars by Blake Harris.

    Here's what I'll say about the ASOIF books: they're written surprisingly well, and Martin really leans heavily on subtext (which I like) but they're not the greatest Fantasy series by any means. If you're a fan of the show and really want to dig deeper and become a "lore whore" like A.Ron, then you'll want to read them or listen to the audiobooks.

    Station Eleven is a post-apocalyptic story that mainly centers around a troupe of travelling actors that perform Shakespeare plays. The timeline jumps around, and you get the perspectives of several characters from pre-apocalypse and post-apocalypse. There isn't very much in the way of "survivalism." This book focuses more on the inner thoughts and struggles of the characters and does a hell of a job making you connect with and care about the characters.

    Console Wars is a non-fiction book about the SEGA vs. Nintendo heyday in the late '80s and early '90s. It's a bit of a tome for a book about video games, but it's fascinating to a nerd like me. It follows the SEGA America team that basically created all the famous SEGA ad campaigns, as well as their tactics for making the Genesis a major player in the console market when Nintendo effectively WAS the console market. The interactions between the people involved are heavily dramatized (i.e. there's no way in hell that the interactions are exact quotes of what happened, but rather stylized, "sexy" approximations of conversations), but for me, that didn't detract from the book; your mileage may vary.

    I also have read the first two books in Patrick Rothfuss's Kingkiller Chronicles, The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear. When I think of book series that might become one day known as a "top ten" in the genre, this easily makes the cut. It's a dark fantasy — about two-parts Earthsea (LeGuin), to one-part ASOIF — with very clever writing. Highly recommended.


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  • Finished a not very good Lolita potboiler of an art world murder mystery, Soho Sins.

    Starting A Short History of the American Revolution
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    Zesder said:

    @tom_g I just picked up It by Steven King as my next book.

    Yasssssss! My favourite King book and one of my top 5 books of all time. Hope you enjoy it!
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    I don't seem to have the attention span for LITERATURE any more. Lately I've just been devouring trashy thriller/crime novels, most of which are highly readable and highly forgettable. And of course they all have blurbs saying they're the next Gone Girl or the next Girl On The Train but they never are.
  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    Dee said:

    I don't seem to have the attention span for LITERATURE any more. Lately I've just been devouring trashy thriller/crime novels, most of which are highly readable and highly forgettable. And of course they all have blurbs saying they're the next Gone Girl or the next Girl On The Train but they never are.

    Have you read Elizabeth Is Missing? That was a recent novel that has a feel of real literature mixed with some twisty turny pulpy stuff.

    Also, I always recommend The Black Dahlia to people who want something easy to read but with a bit of addictive bite to it.
    Dee
  • ElisaElisa Los Angeles

    WarpFox said:

    Here's what I'll say about the ASOIF books: they're written surprisingly well, and Martin really leans heavily on subtext (which I like) but they're not the greatest Fantasy series by any means. If you're a fan of the show and really want to dig deeper and become a "lore whore" like A.Ron, then you'll want to read them or listen to the audiobooks.

    When you say they are "not the greatest Fantasy series" - what makes you say that? The reason I am asking is I don't really like reading fantasy but I have been toying with the idea of actually reading these books. Part of why I like the show is that it is sort of more psuedo-historical with just touches of fantasy. 
    The books are really great in my opinion. ASOIAF is the closet thing to a modern day Tolkein with a quasi-historical subtext.

    I also cannot listen to audiobooks unless it is something that I have already read or a very short book like Fahrenheit 451.

    I try to read classic literature and philosophy but I just cannot with a class, podcast or online book group with cliff notes.

    I read the Simarillion recently with the Tolkein professor podcast and it was awesome.

    My latest book is Octavia Butler's The Parable of Sowers.  I adore science fiction and this novel is really good, bleak, dystopian and scary.  Highly recommended.


  • @WarpFox I read "Station Eleven" earlier this year and loved it. It's one that stuck with me for a while after putting it down.
    WarpFox
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  • DeeDee Adelaide
    @amyja89 I have not read Elizabeth is Missing but I do have it, so I might crack it this weekend as I've just finished something else.

    I have indeed read The Black Dahlia - really liked that one. I had a James Ellroy phase years ago and ploughed through most of his books.
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    @akritenbrink I did English Lit in Year 11 & 12 with a teacher who was very Dead Poet's Society-ish (pre-DPS) and then for a couple of years in Uni, and I think it scarred me (never get me started on why I hate Wuthering Heights).

    Every year I make a NY resolution to read more "serious" books, but truth be told reading is my relaxation and if it's not grabbing me I'm just going to move on to the next thing and I don't care what anyone thinks of my choices. Now and then I'll get hooked on something that's a critical darling, but mostly it's just my trash pile. :-)
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  • DeeDee Adelaide
    @akritenbrink Oh, "English Lit" was a loose term back in my school days - it probably just meant "old fancy books", haha. We did a lot of American stuff as well - Steinbeck, To Kill A Mockingbird, etc. And you James Joyces and Albert Camuses and whatnot.

    I am not a fan of Austen at all - I know I'm the only one, but I consider her books to just be early chick lit and that genre is not my cup of tea at all.
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  • WarpFoxWarpFox Nashville, TN
    edited September 2016
    WarpFox said:

    Here's what I'll say about the ASOIF books: they're written surprisingly well, and Martin really leans heavily on subtext (which I like) but they're not the greatest Fantasy series by any means. If you're a fan of the show and really want to dig deeper and become a "lore whore" like A.Ron, then you'll want to read them or listen to the audiobooks.

    When you say they are "not the greatest Fantasy series" - what makes you say that? The reason I am asking is I don't really like reading fantasy but I have been toying with the idea of actually reading these books. Part of why I like the show is that it is sort of more psuedo-historical with just touches of fantasy. 
    Then you'll love it. As a series in the Fantasy genre, the books are great, but not Great, if you take my meaning. It's really just a matter of opinion for me, but the ASOIAF series lacks a certain je ne sais quoi that causes it to miss the mark for me in terms of "Great Fantasy," but everything in fantasy is inevitably compared to Tolkien, who I believe you said you weren't a fan of anyway.

    So, I'd say that the exact reason I consider ASOIAF a non-contender for the echelons of "best of all time" would be the same reason you may like it. The only warning I would give is that the books are more high-fantasy than the show; there are dudes in the books running around with forked purple beards and there is a lot more high-fantasy lore as background.
  • Doctor_NickDoctor_Nick Terminus
    edited September 2016
    Just finished Sandman Vol 7, working my way through the whole thing. Never read Sandman before and I find it really affecting. Would be a great Netflix or HBO show.
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  • DaveyMacDaveyMac Tokyo
    edited September 2016

    Just finished Sandman Vol 7, working my way through the whole thing. Never read Sandman before and I find it really affecting. Would be a great Netflix or HBO show.

    Sandman is amazing. One of my favorite things I've ever read. After you finish the series I'd suggest reading Endless Nights, Dream Hunters, and Sandman Overture as those are great little extensions to the story.

    I heard Joseph Gordon Levitt was adapting it, but I'm not sure what happened with that. They are making American Gods for Starz which has some similar ideas to those in Sandman. It's a rather divisive book, but I'd recommend giving it a read if you like Sandman. The show looks awesome.
  • WarpFoxWarpFox Nashville, TN
    I highly, highly recommend that anyone who hasn't yet, read Patrick Rothfuss's The Name of the Wind. It's book one of a trilogy, and book two is out as well, The Wise Man's Fear. I know I repped them in my other post, but they are just so damn good. Book three is forthcoming, so for those that may have been burnt by Wheel of Time or Song of Ice & Fire that refuse to begin a series that hasn't been finished yet, you may want to put it off a bit. Everyone else, though — no excuses, go read it.
  • voodooratvoodoorat Atlanta
    edited September 2016
    i have read a lot of fantasy over the (many, many) years since i was a preteen.  in my opinion, the martin books are very well written, especially compared to most fantasy (especially) or scifi.

    *edit* in the spirit of full disclosure: i loved tolkien to pieces (the hobbit and lotr--silmarillion was a slog that took me forever to get through), i bailed on the wheel of time after like 10 books and am left wondering why i wasted so much time reading them, i bailed on the rothfuss books halfway through the second one and have never looked back, and i think goodkind is godawful (read probably 4 or 5 of his).  love gaiman.  i liked station 11, another one to try for an apocalyptic fix (after mccarthy's the road) is dog stars by peter heller.

    *edit* the reason i bailed on the rothfuss books wasn't the writing, i just found the protagonist insufferable.
  • If it ain't Dragonlance Chronicles, it ain't much.

    #raistlinforever
    Melia004
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  • You were a teenager?
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  • I am fairly new to the Forums -  quite enjoyed this thread about books. I've been into non-fiction books lately. The last two that I read were about North Korea, "Nothing to Envy" and "Escape from Camp 14". Very interesting and hard to put down. I'm looking for other non-fiction books, if anyone has recommendations.
    ceburaska
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  • Picked up "Devil in the White City". Non fiction about HH Holmes. Only have heard good things about it and they are making a movie I believe with Leo D. Or last I heard they were.
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