Goddammit, Louis.

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Comments

  • cdrivecdrive Houston, TX
    Wow...incredible. That was like watching someone across the room pour hot coffee on themselves in slow motion, like ‘OH NO PUT YOUR COFFEE DOWN BEFORE YOU CHECK YOUR WRISTWATCH! OH S#%T...he just actually did that.’




    pavlovsbellSomeBiscuitTxSandMan
  • edited November 2017
    Trying to frame yourself as a crusader for justice for rape victims isn't really going to work at this point, I don't think. But hey, keep on with it, you're basically playing "petty forum user who doesn't know when to walk the fuck away" bingo at this point and it's really entertaining to watch you dig yourself further into that hole. Go on, say the mods are Nazis next, I know you're just dying to.
  • Why can’t we bring attention to it all? 
    Murderbearcdrive
  • pavlovsbellpavlovsbell Brooklyn, NY
    This is most brilliant response I've read today. Thank you, Lena Headey, for painting that disturbingly graphic picture. I was just about to nurse my cold with some soup, but I think I'm all out of narcissistic cock.


    CretanBullDeegjulleen
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    This is most brilliant response I've read today. Thank you, Lena Headey, for painting that disturbingly graphic picture. I was just about to nurse my cold with some soup, but I think I'm all out of narcissistic cock.



    LOVE IT.

    Also don't feed the trolls everyone. 
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    edited November 2017
    I don't know man, maybe you can ponder how and why you got here for a while and email me in a few days and you can come back. But right or wrong, nobody is going to beg me to ban them after multiple warnings and not get what they're wanting. Go away and cool off and if you want back on email me after the weekend. Or we can keep banning or ip ban you but just know that no matter what, when you go down that path, you're being the asshole. 

    Something else you can meditate on: http://wondermark.com/1k62/
    BrandonTheBard
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    My wife and I were talking about the Louis story when the news broke (we've been talking about this quite a bit about this since the Weinstein story tipped the scales). She doesn't use Twitter, and I was mentioning that a lot of men were tweeting about feeling "surprised, disillusioned, dejected" etc. And her response was to shake her head. I asked her to elaborate, and she responded that every woman she's ever known has had to endure some measure of these kinds of things - from inappropriate comments to physical assault. Every woman.

    I'm currently raising a 7-year-old girl, and I think about (and worry about) this all of the time. How can I empower her to protect herself? How can I give her the inner strength to pick herself up after someone has demeaned her?
    I feel for you. I remember a conversation with my daughter when she was in her early teens, telling me how grown men would yell at her and her friends when they were walking to school (in school uniforms) to “show us your tits!” and so on. She told me it really scared her but that it happened all the time and she just had to deal with it. :-(

    And now at 19, pretty much every time she goes to a pub with her friends she will come home with a story about how some middle aged guy was trying to come on to them and wouldn’t go away. I don’t have any useful advice, unfortunately - this is the shit girls are subjected to daily. 
    TaraC73pavlovsbellhypergenesbDaveyMacA_Ron_Hubbard
  • I'm sorry your daughter has to deal with that.

    One of my first times riding the public bus solo at like 12, a guy sat next to me and smelled my hair and made sexual comments. I cried quietly and got off at my stop and never even told anyone. 

    I thought it it must have been my fault, and was afraid to tell. 

    I don’t ride the bus as an adult. I avoid many running trails entirely. There are streets I know better than to walk down. I have a small dog, but dream of getting a Rottweiler or Doberman so I could enjoy some of the trails near where I live. 

    If the the outcome of this is little girls (and boys, and women, and men) know it’s okay to tell, it’ll be worth it. 
    DeeJaimieTDaveyMac
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    edited November 2017
    When I read through the back and forth between @Thomas ;and @A_Ron_Hubbard ;I thought of this John Mulaney standup bit....

    “I was talking to a friend recently and I told him that I didn’t think I believed in the death penalty. And my friend said to me, ‘Oh, so you’re telling me that if you saw Hitler walking down the street you wouldn’t kill him?’

    That wasn’t what I was telling you. But all right. Let’s talk about this… entirely new topic.” -John Mulaney


    It's really fucking frustrating when you want to get to the root of a problem, and someone just keeps high roading you. There is no common sense in only ever wanting to solve the world's biggest problems, at all times. (and honestly, it always feels like a copout because, what.... you really gunna solve rape? Misogynistic culture?   Maybe just having a discussion about a guy who has a compulsion to show his dick to women is a good place to start. No one is saying it's worse than rape, they're saying it's worse than not doing it. That's all we ruminate on for the moment.



    JaimieTSomeBiscuitDeeTaraC73MurderbearDaveyMacFlukesz74al
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    @aberry89 Sidenote: I will be devastated if anything comes out about John Mulaney. He’s basically the only stand up comedian I like. 
    Murderbear
  • In case anyone's interested, here's what Pamela Adlon had to say about Louis: 

    "My family and I are devastated and in shock after the admission of abhorrent behavior by my friend and partner, Louis C.K. I feel deep sorrow and empathy for the women who have come forward. I am asking for privacy at this time for myself and my family. I am processing and grieving and hope to say more as soon as I am able."

    She has a little bit more to say in the audio interview on KCRW's The Business podcast. I don't think anything is going to happen to her show as a result of this. Better Things is one of my Top 5 shows on TV right now. Season 2 is brilliant. And it was co-written with Louis. 
    SomeBiscuit
  • edited November 2017
    These allegations have put the fates of a lot of different TV shows up in the air, but it doesn't feel right making the conversation about that at this time, since it isn't what's important right now. That being said, I'll make an exception to say that I really hope nothing happens to Better Things because of all this - not just because it's a fantastic show, but because its messages are so antithetical to everything Louis C.K. now represents, it would feel wrong if it ended as a result of his actions.
    hypergenesb
  • DaveyMacDaveyMac Tokyo
    edited November 2017
    I tend to not make comments in these types of threads as I don’t often feel I have anything of value to add that hasn’t already been said. But I just want to say that I find these types of threads and discussions to be incredibly valuable and I am constantly impressed by the Bald Move community’s ability have discussions like these and largely remain civil. It’s easily my favorite place on the internet. 

    And I am so appreciative of the voices of so many people here sharing experiences and ideas from perspectives outside of my personal life experience. One thing that I have made a conscious effort to do over the past year or so is start following more women and people of color on Twitter and unfollowing a lot of the white dudes I used to follow and it’s completely changed the stuff that I am exposed to and has really opened my eyes to a lot of viewpoints I just hadn’t considered before.

    One thing I did want to say on the issue of sexual harassment/abuse is that I really think the onus needs to be put on men. This is an idea I saw someone tweet about, so I can’t take credit, but we often talk about sexual harassment/abuse as something that happens to women, as opposed to something that men are actively doing, and that is a problem. When you talk about it in the passive voice it makes it seem like it’s just a thing that happens and there’s nothing we can do about it. One sickening example in Tokyo is that there used to be a sign near the stairs in Akihabara station (The electronics capital of Japan) that warned women that men may be lurking to take upskirt photos so they should be careful. But where was the sign warning men not to be predatory assholes and not do that type of shit? Sexual harassment/abuse runs rampant in this country and nobody likes to talk about it. It’s kind of normalized actually, which scares me.

    Also, following on from what @hypergenesb was saying about raising a daughter, I have a 4-month old daughter and I have a lot of the same anxieties and she’s still just a baby. I also have a 3-year old son and, and I am doing everything I can to raise him to be a good man and be respectful of women. But I also know I won’t be around him as much once he’s in school and and I’m really worried about influences around him and I just hope that I can do enough. In any case I have a lot of anxieties about that too. 
    TaraC73gguenotaberry89DeeJaimieThypergenesbmajjam0770
  • aberry89aberry89 California
    edited November 2017
    Totally agree, Baldmove forums are pretty incredible with how civil the conversations have remained. And godddamn, if we have not been through a year where all that could go to shit!

    That upskirt photo warning in Japan is so depressing. I can't help but not think of high school when girls were handed out special dress codes papers at the beginning of every year. Don't wear your shorts too high, don't show your bra straps, as to not distract the boys. This shit starts to be normalized so young. Your bodies are distractions, it's up to you keep it safe. 

    @DaveyMac ;
    JaimieTmajjam0770DaveyMacz74al
  • A lot of Asian public transport has warnings and posters on this. It’s a real problem because the transport is so crammed that pervert asshole guys can gripe a woman and act like it was an accident. Last time I was in japan they had women only train cars because of this. 
  • Not that anyone asked for another man's perspective on Louis CK, but considering his relationship w/ Louis, Maron's opener on the latest WTF is maybe worth a listen:

    http://www.wtfpod.com/podcast/episode-863-kim-deal

    Transcript:

    JaimieT
  • A_Ron_HubbardA_Ron_Hubbard Cincinnati, OH
    edited November 2017
    aberry89 said:

    It's really fucking frustrating when you want to get to the root of a problem, and someone just keeps high roading you. There is no common sense in only ever wanting to solve the world's biggest problems, at all times. (and honestly, it always feels like a copout because, what.... you really gunna solve rape? Misogynistic culture?   Maybe just having a discussion about a guy who has a compulsion to show his dick to women is a good place to start. No one is saying it's worse than rape, they're saying it's worse than not doing it. That's all we ruminate on for the moment.

    Obviously anyone who spends time worrying about anything BUT the eventual heat death of the universe is just putting their heads in the sand. 
    aberry89
  • JaimieTJaimieT Atlanta, GA
    Interesting he goes on to talk about his own sexual assault/harrassment experience. (I didn't see that in the transcript anyway...)
  • aberry89 said:
    Totally agree, Baldmove forums are pretty incredible with how civil the conversations have remained. And godddamn, if we have not been through a year where all that could go to shit!
      I too have really been impressed by the at times heated, yet overall respectful tone of this conversation.  Reading through these thoughtful comments has made me reexamine some of way I have approached this issue in my mind.  I am a woman who works as a manager in a manufacturing plant, in an industry that is like 90% male. And sometimes after listening to the guys complain about women in their life all day I sometimes think, gee women can be pretty shitty.  (And I also think, yeah well I am sure she is not the only person to blame that you ended up divorced twice with 3 kids and have a lot of alimony, Mister.)   

    I will even say here I have seen one verified false accusation made by a female employee against a male employee (at least the specific incident she mentioned was in an area monitored by a camera, and there was a lot of background to the situation that I won't go into here).   So it can happen.  And it does seem like there can be a lot of repercussions to just an accusation.  A person could lose their job and even family, in a worst case scenario if someone just makes a claim.  And there is no way to validate or disprove most of these claims since largely it comes down to he said she said.  But I think the majority of real incidents go unreported (I am guilty of keeping silent too often) because there is almost always no reward and a lot of consequence for speaking up, even for so called small things.    

     I think of the few times I have read very offensive messages on texts that a male manager thought he was only sending out to a group of fellow male coworkers.  How one of my male managers would comment on the looks of all female applicants prior to hiring or not hiring them.  How I truly feel that if I complain too much about this behavior, I will lose ability to be promoted and just be further excluded from meetings and conversations necessary to do my job.  How every accusation made by a woman subjected her to being called a liar and worse before the evidence was even reviewed.  And a million other things I could go on about.

    So my thoughts have been a little conflicted on this issue is what I am saying.  The truth is that men and women have their fair share of assholes, and members of both genders are more than capable of using the system to their own advantage, when they perceive that the power is on their side.   But the scale is way way way favored to the male side of things in ways that sometimes I am not even always aware of it is so ingrained.  I think these recent news reports are at least finally showing there can be real repercussions to abusing power in this way, but we are a long way from where we need to be.

    I have a daughter who is a teenager now, and she is sadly starting to deal with this stuff more.  But I see a lot of hope in her generation.  I see less of the quiet ignoring and acceptance of the situation in her and her friends than I had growing up.  As an example, her 8th grade class staged a secret "short shorts" day via instagram, as it was hot outside towards the end of the school year, and both girls and boys were dressing in ways that were not approved by the dress code more frequently (ie, more scantily clad).  But only the girls were being asked to cover up or go home.  So a large group of the girls got together and all wore shorts that were too short one day.  And to the school's credit, they were aware this was happening (kids are never as secretive as they think they are), and they gave no punishment, but had the girls into a room in groups and had  open and thoughtful discussions about why they staged this event. For the rest of the year there was not unequal enforcement of the dress code anyway.  So the world is still far from perfect, but there is some movement in the right direction.   

    I totally agree with a previous poster that said the onus has to be put more on the side that is doing the bad thing, rather than the potential victims having to change their behavior.   That is a mind shift that will help all genders.  

     Oh my this turned into a long rambling post.  But i will submit it anyways, Thanks for providing a forum where we can have an open and honest discussion on this.
    JaimieTTxSandManDaveyMacBrawnFlukes
  • amyja89amyja89 Oxford, England
    This is kind of off topic I know, but with all of these new revelations every day, I can't help but keep wondering how the hell we all forgot and forgave Michael Jackson the way that the world as a whole did. TWICE.

    I mean, I listen to his music probably every single day still, was obsessed with him as a youngster, and yet I don't know anybody, myself included, who doesn't think that he messed with kids in some way.

    Is it really a case of being SO famous and SO talented that it literally doesn't matter what you do? 
    Dee
  • amyja89 said:
    This is kind of off topic I know, but with all of these new revelations every day, I can't help but keep wondering how the hell we all forgot and forgave Michael Jackson the way that the world as a whole did. TWICE.

    I mean, I listen to his music probably every single day still, was obsessed with him as a youngster, and yet I don't know anybody, myself included, who doesn't think that he messed with kids in some way.

    Is it really a case of being SO famous and SO talented that it literally doesn't matter what you do? 
    People have short term memories and if you make money, make them feel good, etc they are much more likely to forgive you. Catholic Church, forgiven, MJ, forgiven, Polanski, basically “forgiven”, Mel Gibson, Forgiven, the list goes on and on and on. Of course we also have to define if there is something a person could do/say to get back in someone’s good graces. Very personal and everyone will feel differently. 
  • Can’t help but share this story:

    My mom wouldn’t let us listen to Michael Jackson as kids.  She told my sister and me what he was accused of (not details, just enough we didn’t complain about a family boycott).  I was young and my sister had Down’s syndrome. She had been obsessed with Jackson.   Posters and records and everything.  

    I didnt like him anymore, my sister hated him.   If you think people with Down’s are only capable of love: you are wrong. She got called out for flipping off a cardboard stand up of him in front of the music store. My mom told whoever tattled that she had taught her kids to point out child molesters. My sister felt personally betrayed. 

    To this day I think I hate him more for betraying her than what he actually did. 
  • FreddyFreddy Denton, Texas
    edited November 2017
    KingKobra said:
    amyja89 said:
    This is kind of off topic I know, but with all of these new revelations every day, I can't help but keep wondering how the hell we all forgot and forgave Michael Jackson the way that the world as a whole did. TWICE.

    I mean, I listen to his music probably every single day still, was obsessed with him as a youngster, and yet I don't know anybody, myself included, who doesn't think that he messed with kids in some way.

    Is it really a case of being SO famous and SO talented that it literally doesn't matter what you do? 
    People have short term memories and if you make money, make them feel good, etc they are much more likely to forgive you. Catholic Church, forgiven, MJ, forgiven, Polanski, basically “forgiven”, Mel Gibson, Forgiven, the list goes on and on and on. Of course we also have to define if there is something a person could do/say to get back in someone’s good graces. Very personal and everyone will feel differently. 
    Mike Tyson is the one that comes to mind over all else. He was convicted of rape, and is loved now more than ever.
  • DeeDee Adelaide
    edited November 2017
    @Freddy That one infuriates me, but I did laugh a lot at your typo.   :D
    gguenotKingKobraasmallcat
  • His rap game was so bad they indicted him.
  • Freddy said:
    KingKobra said:
    amyja89 said:
    This is kind of off topic I know, but with all of these new revelations every day, I can't help but keep wondering how the hell we all forgot and forgave Michael Jackson the way that the world as a whole did. TWICE.

    I mean, I listen to his music probably every single day still, was obsessed with him as a youngster, and yet I don't know anybody, myself included, who doesn't think that he messed with kids in some way.

    Is it really a case of being SO famous and SO talented that it literally doesn't matter what you do? 
    People have short term memories and if you make money, make them feel good, etc they are much more likely to forgive you. Catholic Church, forgiven, MJ, forgiven, Polanski, basically “forgiven”, Mel Gibson, Forgiven, the list goes on and on and on. Of course we also have to define if there is something a person could do/say to get back in someone’s good graces. Very personal and everyone will feel differently. 
    Mike Tyson is the one that comes to mind over all else. He was convicted of rap, and is loved now more than ever.
    He went to jail for “one” of his crimes, so people will tend to be more lienent. It’s one thing we don’t see often “celebrities” going to jail for the crimes they commit. The quandary comes up, do you give people second chances? If so, what are said limitations to your willingness to give someone a second chance. It’s a black hole that we will find many differences. Has the person changed for the better? Even if they have can you support them because of what they have done in the past? It’s deeply personal, but I think at least with celebrities\atheletes people are willing to give multiple chances to them when at other times they would not. This goes back to my original post about this celeb\athelete making the person feel good\ or making them money. We put head people on high pedestals and expect them to be “better” than us, when often they are not and because they are popular\wealthy it is easy to hide this side of their personality. 
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